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Thread: Are our spinal neurons just sleepy???? I am thinking so too

  1. #1

    Are our spinal neurons just sleepy???? I am thinking so too


  2. #2
    Senior Member Fragile's Avatar
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    I wondered that as well. I've read here, as well as other places, that all of the disconnected nerves above and below the injury site die off shortly after a spinal cord injury occurs. That would mean for a cure, nerves would have to be regenerated from the brain all the way to the end of the spinal cord. Does this study suggest there could still be quite a few "living" nerves?

  3. #3
    But I guess the whole findings with the new Neurostim thing says more than likely most of us still have some connections left that we don't know we even have. Most of the injuries they tried it on were 2 years or so, but I'd think 2 years or 40 years would not be much different at the injury site as I heard most of the changes occur within the first 2 couple of months once the person is out of spinal shock.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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    Curt, I have been saying there probably is countless things your body is doing you are unaware of. They do them independently as well as supplemental/secondary to even execute something. Once again, still unaware of? Take your eyes out of the process. Close them. Lay down and see if you can even "visually" think your way through something. NOT moving your leg. See if you can even think what your upper body, above waist, must do, before you even try to move a leg. Your brain better be sending all of the correct information throughout your body for things to even get started. I know for sure I was trying to step with 1 leg, I had my upper body weight on the incorrect side. Brain probably sending step signal when it should have been jump. My eyes played a huge factor in doing the incorrect. Eyes were send step with the leg actually supposed to be doing support. This is hard to describe. But seriously, think about this. Forget the actual movement. Your brain needs to be correct first. Your eyes are not sending visual input to your brain while you are in a woman's womb.

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    Curt, BTW, I would not put any timeframe on what you can do. I am 12+ years and now have my toes moving. I have built some vey good strength throughout my quads. Still need a lot of work, I but I keep adding to it. I have very little equipment. I have manual dumbbells, a walker, therabands and 1 band I use for stretching. I try mu hardest to not allow equipment doing what my body should be doing itself. Using the equipment, I feel, is an addiction. Once you are sing it, it is tough to turn off. Your brain is saying it is easier with equipment.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Fragile View Post
    I wondered that as well. I've read here, as well as other places, that all of the disconnected nerves above and below the injury site die off shortly after a spinal cord injury occurs. That would mean for a cure, nerves would have to be regenerated from the brain all the way to the end of the spinal cord.
    Here is evidence that is not the case:

    1. J Neurosci. 2010 Aug 25;30(34):11516-28. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1433-10.2010. Unexpected survival of neurons of origin of the pyramidal tract after spinal cord injury. Nielson JL(1), Sears-Kraxberger I, Strong MK, Wong JK, Willenberg R, Steward O. Author information: (1)Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Reeve-Irvine Research Center, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA. There is continuing controversy about whether the cells of origin of the corticospinal tract (CST) undergo retrograde cell death after spinal cord injury (SCI). All previous attempts to assess this have used imaging and/or histological techniques to assess upper motoneurons in the cerebral cortex. Here, we address the question in a novel way by assessing Wallerian degeneration and axon numbers in the medullary pyramid of Sprague Dawley rats after both acute SCI, either at cervical level 5 (C5) or thoracic level 9 (T9), and chronic SCI at T9. Our findings demonstrate that only a fraction of a percentage of the total axons in the medullary pyramid exhibit any sign of degeneration at any time after SCI--no more so than in uninjured control rats. Moreover, design-based counts of myelinated axons revealed no decrease in axon number in the medullary pyramid after SCI, regardless of injury level, severity, or time after injury. Spinal cord-injured rats had fewer myelinated axons in the medullary pyramid at 1 year after injury than aged matched controls, suggesting that injury may affect ongoing myelination of axons during aging. We conclude that SCI does not cause death of the CST cell bodies in the cortex; therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at promoting axon regeneration of the CST in the spinal cord do not require a separate intervention to prevent retrograde degeneration of upper motoneurons in the cortex.
    Last edited by crabbyshark; 05-06-2014 at 01:17 PM.

  7. #7
    You have lot of SCi with just partial spinal cord damage and the most of Neurons still intact.
    However in 90% cases recovery is not happening due to spinal shock and blockage of the whole transmission.
    (I think No-Go hormones or something creating immediate paralysis when Injury happens to prevent "misfiring"
    as could cause even brain damage);
    How to reactivate and retrain intact nerves to take over and start to replace roles of damaged nerves will be probably
    easy to know and understand 12 years from now.
    Some New chemical compounds (Old school 4AP and newer Spinalon) along with electric stimulation, possibly acupuncture
    and inevitably lot of repetitions in form of walking exercises can bring much better outcome for people "destined" for the life
    in wheelchair.
    www.MiracleofWalk.com

    Miracles are not contrary to nature, but only contrary
    to what we know about nature
    Saint Augustine

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