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Thread: Mazda5

  1. #1
    Senior Member Lone Beagle's Avatar
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    Mazda5

    I picked up my Mazda5 at the accessibility dealer yesterday. It is awesome! Pictures soon. I am 57 years old, out of shape, "slightly" overweight and more than 30 years post injury. It is one of the easiest transfers and wheelchair loading I have ever experienced. The adapt solutions stuff is simple, effective and doesn't involve cutting the car. Love it!

  2. #2
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Congrats Lone Beagle. Hope it works out for you.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  3. #3
    Senior Member tooley's Avatar
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    welcome to the club! (glad I could help out with a little advice)


    For everyone's sake (future reference for those googling the subject):

    2 weeks ago my Speedi-Lift gave up the ghost after 3.5 years of service. In that time it had very few hiccups. Once in a while (only a handful of times) in its fully extended position it wouldn't want to engage the electric motor to raise the chair. I believed this to be an issue with a possible chafed wire causing it to ground out occasionally. When I would physically push down (momentarily, nothing forceful) on the armature that grabs the wheelchair it would engage again. Did not worry too much about it because it seldom happened.

    Also one time when I had a bunch of other stuff loaded in the vehicle something shifted and fell on the turn-handle used to adjust the in-and-out motor's tooth adjustment. This turn-handle is used to loosen the engagement teeth from the track that slides the chair in-and-out of its position in the vehicle. Once loosened the motor can be adjusted/shifted out of position in the event of a malfunction (electric motor, wiring, dead battery) so that the armature that holds the wheelchair can be slid in/out to make the car driveable. So make sure that's tight enough, plus be aware of the possibility. This incident made me pull the cover to see what makes it tick (and to trouble-shoot this occurrence). I'm glad I did because it gave me an understand (and courage) enough to figure out the next problem---

    One day arrived home (lucky to not get stranded) and the armature would not raise after lowering and releasing my wheelchair. The motor was turning but was not engaging. Popped the cover off (one 5/16" sheet metal screw in the centre of the top) and found the collar on the sector shaft that actuates the armature's lever movement was loose, spinning freely not allowing its gear to engage the worm gear of the motor. Me fix-ee.

    And the final thing that got me to unbolt my beloved Speedi-Lift - the electric motor responsible for sliding the armature in and out on its track shit the bed. Luckily for me I had arrived home to the underground parking and did not get stranded.

    (sorry no pics to bolster the above "explanations")


    While it could sound like the Speedi-Lift may be a colossal pile of shit, I don't feel that way and it isn't. When it worked, which it did 99.999999%, I was a very happy man. No mess, no fuss. For those of you that break down your chair every time, good for you, I will concede at this point in my cripple life it isn't a big deal. But when I was first injured breaking down an 18x18 ZRa1 with a floppy backrest and very poor hand function (C7) it was a huge fucking deal. Deal-breaker. Didn't want to be seen doing that, sucked balls getting it in and out of any vehicle "at that time". And "at that time" I had enough in my new life that sucked balls.
    So after doing my homework the Mazda5 setup developed by Adapt-Solutions seemed like a godsend. And it was. Prior to this I had no confidence, no prospects, no hope for a future as a quadriplegic. Making driving easy was a step in the right direction. Those of you who may have actually read my posts in the past know my story. I won't bore anyone else here, but I will say that with the help of my adapted mazda5 my life has improved exponentially. To me the thing is worth its weight in gold.

    I always told myself when it gave up I would take it apart and re-brush the motors, refurbish it, fix it and re-install. Thankfully, after removing it and not using it, I won't. One less thing, right? The spot where it once resided (behind the driver seat, duh) is now completely vacant leaving ample room to pull either of my chairs (16x16 Oracing XTR-1 & 15x16 Lasher BT-Mg) into. Like everything as a cripple - it sucked first time but I knew I had no choice. Sitting on the XL-Board (Adapt-Solution piece that bolts underneath the driver seat, no permanent mods nec.) I hook my left arm through the headrest of the vehicles driver seat for balance while raising the front of the wheelchair until I can grab it with my left hand (still hooked through the headrest) and push the wheelchair in entirely.
    We all know every crip does things uniquely, there is probably a method I haven't developed yet that will be easier. But for now I've got it down to around 15 seconds. Which ain't bad.

    What I'm trying to get at here is that the SpeediLift is a great tool for anyone, no matter level of injury. I have luckily recovered enough function in my hands to grip the chair in order to achieve the above unaided. So to whomever is thinking about the Speedi-Lift and reads this know that it is possible. The XL-Board provides me a level of safety in adverse winter conditions (which are currently still active, 6 months on this season) plus I believe is a shoulder saver. There are days when I would second-think going out or making an extra stop if I were doing regular chair-to-car transfers everytime. The XL-Board makes them almost effortless and, as I say, most importantly safer. Falling in the snow is not my idea of fun, nor are those extra lifts back and forth into the car.

    For all those reading this that drive regular vehicles - yes. Yes, I'm a geek in a soccer-mom's car. Yes, I'm not a big man like you. Yes, I have clean dry clothes when I get home from a long day. Yes, my shoulders love me. Yes, the front passenger seat is available for someone to sit in. Yes, that seat is clean. Yes, there are no oily spots. Yes.... you get the idea. My chairs love me too, not getting dragged across the pavement like a street hockey net or some type of car part or furniture that you wish you never laid eyes on.

    I know most will read this like wtf is u retarded? A little... but as I said it got me to this point without regrets and would do it all again in a heartbeat. All but break my neck.

  4. #4
    Senior Member tooley's Avatar
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    wanted to add for LoneBeagle: be aware of what could go wrong with it and what to do to fix those situations. The manual has instructions and I hope they are still including the allan wrench (painted yellow and kept handy on the carpeted cover) used in order to stow the SpeediLift back in the vehicle in the event of a power-out (dead battery, wiring problem)

    again, CONGRATS on making your life easier.

  5. #5
    Thanks, tooley. I will be buying a car (my first) sometime in the next few months. Your write-up was very helpful.

  6. #6
    GREAT POST TOOLEY. AGREED IF IT MAKES LIFE A BIT EASIER GO FOR IT. love to see some pics.


    Quote Originally Posted by tooley View Post
    welcome to the club! (glad I could help out with a little advice)


    For everyone's sake (future reference for those googling the subject):

    2 weeks ago my Speedi-Lift gave up the ghost after 3.5 years of service. In that time it had very few hiccups. Once in a while (only a handful of times) in its fully extended position it wouldn't want to engage the electric motor to raise the chair. I believed this to be an issue with a possible chafed wire causing it to ground out occasionally. When I would physically push down (momentarily, nothing forceful) on the armature that grabs the wheelchair it would engage again. Did not worry too much about it because it seldom happened.

    Also one time when I had a bunch of other stuff loaded in the vehicle something shifted and fell on the turn-handle used to adjust the in-and-out motor's tooth adjustment. This turn-handle is used to loosen the engagement teeth from the track that slides the chair in-and-out of its position in the vehicle. Once loosened the motor can be adjusted/shifted out of position in the event of a malfunction (electric motor, wiring, dead battery) so that the armature that holds the wheelchair can be slid in/out to make the car driveable. So make sure that's tight enough, plus be aware of the possibility. This incident made me pull the cover to see what makes it tick (and to trouble-shoot this occurrence). I'm glad I did because it gave me an understand (and courage) enough to figure out the next problem---

    One day arrived home (lucky to not get stranded) and the armature would not raise after lowering and releasing my wheelchair. The motor was turning but was not engaging. Popped the cover off (one 5/16" sheet metal screw in the centre of the top) and found the collar on the sector shaft that actuates the armature's lever movement was loose, spinning freely not allowing its gear to engage the worm gear of the motor. Me fix-ee.

    And the final thing that got me to unbolt my beloved Speedi-Lift - the electric motor responsible for sliding the armature in and out on its track shit the bed. Luckily for me I had arrived home to the underground parking and did not get stranded.

    (sorry no pics to bolster the above "explanations")


    While it could sound like the Speedi-Lift may be a colossal pile of shit, I don't feel that way and it isn't. When it worked, which it did 99.999999%, I was a very happy man. No mess, no fuss. For those of you that break down your chair every time, good for you, I will concede at this point in my cripple life it isn't a big deal. But when I was first injured breaking down an 18x18 ZRa1 with a floppy backrest and very poor hand function (C7) it was a huge fucking deal. Deal-breaker. Didn't want to be seen doing that, sucked balls getting it in and out of any vehicle "at that time". And "at that time" I had enough in my new life that sucked balls.
    So after doing my homework the Mazda5 setup developed by Adapt-Solutions seemed like a godsend. And it was. Prior to this I had no confidence, no prospects, no hope for a future as a quadriplegic. Making driving easy was a step in the right direction. Those of you who may have actually read my posts in the past know my story. I won't bore anyone else here, but I will say that with the help of my adapted mazda5 my life has improved exponentially. To me the thing is worth its weight in gold.

    I always told myself when it gave up I would take it apart and re-brush the motors, refurbish it, fix it and re-install. Thankfully, after removing it and not using it, I won't. One less thing, right? The spot where it once resided (behind the driver seat, duh) is now completely vacant leaving ample room to pull either of my chairs (16x16 Oracing XTR-1 & 15x16 Lasher BT-Mg) into. Like everything as a cripple - it sucked first time but I knew I had no choice. Sitting on the XL-Board (Adapt-Solution piece that bolts underneath the driver seat, no permanent mods nec.) I hook my left arm through the headrest of the vehicles driver seat for balance while raising the front of the wheelchair until I can grab it with my left hand (still hooked through the headrest) and push the wheelchair in entirely.
    We all know every crip does things uniquely, there is probably a method I haven't developed yet that will be easier. But for now I've got it down to around 15 seconds. Which ain't bad.

    What I'm trying to get at here is that the SpeediLift is a great tool for anyone, no matter level of injury. I have luckily recovered enough function in my hands to grip the chair in order to achieve the above unaided. So to whomever is thinking about the Speedi-Lift and reads this know that it is possible. The XL-Board provides me a level of safety in adverse winter conditions (which are currently still active, 6 months on this season) plus I believe is a shoulder saver. There are days when I would second-think going out or making an extra stop if I were doing regular chair-to-car transfers everytime. The XL-Board makes them almost effortless and, as I say, most importantly safer. Falling in the snow is not my idea of fun, nor are those extra lifts back and forth into the car.

    For all those reading this that drive regular vehicles - yes. Yes, I'm a geek in a soccer-mom's car. Yes, I'm not a big man like you. Yes, I have clean dry clothes when I get home from a long day. Yes, my shoulders love me. Yes, the front passenger seat is available for someone to sit in. Yes, that seat is clean. Yes, there are no oily spots. Yes.... you get the idea. My chairs love me too, not getting dragged across the pavement like a street hockey net or some type of car part or furniture that you wish you never laid eyes on.

    I know most will read this like wtf is u retarded? A little... but as I said it got me to this point without regrets and would do it all again in a heartbeat. All but break my neck.
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

  7. #7

  8. #8
    This Ford B-Max would make a great choice for wheelers. Not available, however, in the US.




    Wouldn't this be nice?
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by stephen212; 03-28-2014 at 06:27 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member tooley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    GREAT POST TOOLEY. AGREED IF IT MAKES LIFE A BIT EASIER GO FOR IT. love to see some pics.
    thanks big man. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ - oh, how you've mellowed over the years.

    Parkade is too dark for decent pics. I'll take some once it warms up, (still!) 0 deg F with the windchill.. <grrr> dying to get handcycling outdoors, my SportsCrafter just isn't cutting it.

    thanks Stephen. Good luck.. to each there own, what works for some won't for others. The new body style of the 5 is fugly but they are better than ever as far as drivetrain goes, that they have always shared with the 3.

  10. #10
    yes my friend I have........ I hear ya, our weather is just starting to break. woke up to 2 inches of snow. 65 Tuesday hoping to finally get training on the rode.


    Quote Originally Posted by tooley View Post
    thanks big man. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ - oh, how you've mellowed over the years.

    Parkade is too dark for decent pics. I'll take some once it warms up, (still!) 0 deg F with the windchill.. <grrr> dying to get handcycling outdoors, my SportsCrafter just isn't cutting it.

    thanks Stephen. Good luck.. to each there own, what works for some won't for others. The new body style of the 5 is fugly but they are better than ever as far as drivetrain goes, that they have always shared with the 3.
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

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