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Thread: Researchers generate new neurons in brains, spinal cords of living adult mammals

  1. #1
    Senior Member Leo's Avatar
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    Researchers generate new neurons in brains, spinal cords of living adult mammals

    Scientists in UT Southwestern's Department of Molecular Biology first successfully turned astrocytes ? the most common non-neuronal brain cells ? into neurons that formed networks in mice. They now successfully turned scar-forming astrocytes in the spinal cords of adult mice into neurons. The latest findings are published today in Nature Communications and follow previous findings published in Nature Cell Biology.

    "Our earlier work was the first to clearly show in vivo (in a living animal) that mature astrocytes can be reprogrammed to become functional neurons without the need of cell transplantation. The current study did something similar in the spine, turning scar-forming astrocytes into progenitor cells called neuroblasts that regenerated into neurons," said Dr. Chun-Li Zhang, assistant professor of molecular biology at UT Southwestern and senior author of both studies.

    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-0...rds-adult.html
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  2. #2
    Wise,

    in the aticle posted by Leo I read:

    "Astrocytes are abundant and widely distributed both in the brain and in the spinal cord. In response to injury, these cells proliferate and contribute to scar formation. Once a scar has formed, it seals the injured area and creates a mechanical and biochemical barrier to neural regeneration," Dr. Zhang explained. "Our results indicate that the astrocytes may be ideal targets for in vivo reprogramming."

    Do you agree with Dr. Zhang here?

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  3. #3
    Interesting development - thanks for sharing. A small piece in the puzzle I hope.

  4. #4
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    Isn't this like the holy grail of what we want?
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by lunasicc42 View Post
    Isn't this like the holy grail of what we want?
    What is good for sure is that here they are looking at chronic SCI, so it may bring something good for us.

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  6. #6
    Everything looks very good, cells survive over long time also. Unfortunately the number of converted cells were quite low. Hope someone really will strive to find a strategy to restore function using SOX2!
    Debating on CareCure is like participating in the special-olympics. You may win, but you're still disabled.

  7. #7
    Researchers generate new neurons in spinal cords of living adult mammals
    Posted on February 26, 2014 by christalpowell
    UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers created new nerve cells in the brains and spinal cords of living mammals without the need for stem cell transplants to replenish lost cells.

    Although the research indicates it may someday be possible to regenerate neurons from the body's own cells to repair traumatic brain injury or spinal cord damage or to treat conditions such as Alzheimer?s disease, the researchers stressed that it is too soon to know whether the neurons created in these initial studies resulted in any functional improvements, a goal for future research.

    Spinal cord injuries can lead to an irreversible loss of neurons, and along with scarring, can ultimately lead to impaired motor and sensory functions. Scientists are hopeful that regenerating cells can be an avenue to repair damage, but adult spinal cords have limited ability to produce new neurons. Biomedical scientists have transplanted stem cells to replace neurons, but have faced other hurdles, underscoring the need for new methods of replenishing lost cells.

    Scientists in UT Southwestern's Department of Molecular Biology first successfully turned astrocytes. The most common non-neuronal brain cells into neurons that formed networks in mice. They now successfully turned scar-forming astrocytes in the spinal cords of adult mice into neurons. The latest findings are published today in Nature Communications and follow previous findings published in Nature Cell Biology.


    Researchers generate new neurons in spinal cords of living adult mammals
    Posted on February 26, 2014 by christalpowell
    UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers created new nerve cells in the brains and spinal cords of living mammals without the need for stem cell transplants to replenish lost cells.

    Although the research indicates it may someday be possible to regenerate neurons from the body?s own cells to repair traumatic brain injury or spinal cord damage or to treat conditions such as Alzheimer?s disease, the researchers stressed that it is too soon to know whether the neurons created in these initial studies resulted in any functional improvements, a goal for future research.

    Spinal cord injuries can lead to an irreversible loss of neurons, and along with scarring, can ultimately lead to impaired motor and sensory functions. Scientists are hopeful that regenerating cells can be an avenue to repair damage, but adult spinal cords have limited ability to produce new neurons. Biomedical scientists have transplanted stem cells to replace neurons, but have faced other hurdles, underscoring the need for new methods of replenishing lost cells.

    Scientists in UT Southwesterns Department of Molecular Biology first successfully turned astrocytes ? the most common non-neuronal brain cells ? into neurons that formed networks in mice. They now successfully turned scar-forming astrocytes in the spinal cords of adult mice into neurons. The latest findings are published today in Nature Communications and follow previous findings published in Nature Cell Biology.

  8. #8
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    sorry fellows that i have post the same thread

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