Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Loads of sediment, I need advice.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cowboys_Place's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    544

    Loads of sediment, I need advice.

    Recently I've been getting a boatload of sediment and last night it clogged my SP solid. I recently had an ultrasound and ex rays on my bladder and kidneys and was told everything looks fine. I went through the antibiotics/uti routine about three weeks ago.

    So what's the best way to keep this sediment away? I've read page after page about this Vetercyn vf and recently came across something called Renacidin. Taking into account that my elderly mother will be performing this flushing procedure which is the easiest to use and does anyone know how much this Renacidin cost?
    Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway. .(John Wayne)

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cowboys_Place's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    544
    PS what causes all this sediment?
    Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway. .(John Wayne)

  3. #3
    Causes of sediment in urine
    A few common causes of sediment in urine are:


    • Diabetes: Diabetic patients may experience sediment in urine. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood sugar. The excess glucose is removed from the body as sediment in urine.Starving people, as well as patients of diabetes and other diseases tend to experience breakdown of fat by the body for energy production. This process results in formation of a byproduct called ketones, which also get eliminated as sediment in urine.
    • Bladder stones:As men grow older, the prostate tends to experience overgrowth. This causes the urethra to become compressed, thereby affecting free flow of urine. The remaining urine collects in the bladder and eventually develops into hardened bladder stones. They then get eliminated from the body as sediment in urine. Women can experience decreased outflow of urine due to weakening of bladder nerves and bladder pressure, as well as bladder damage due to presence of conditions like bladder diverticula. Use of bladder catheters, inflammation of the pelvic area and the bladder due to radiation treatments, and use of certain types of contraceptive devices can also increase the risk to development of bladder stones. Sometimes kidney stones can pass into the bladder through the ureters.
    • Liver diseases:Bilirubin is a protein manufactured by the liver. It gets removed from the body along with other urine sediment components. The occurrence of bilirubin in urine sediments can signify varied underlying liver conditions, and/or hemolysis or bile duct obstruction. Untreated cases of bilirubin in urine can result in jaundice. Hence, patients must immediately consult a doctor.
    • Red blood cells or RBCs in urine: Hematuria or bloody urine can also result in sediments in urine. RBCs in urine is one of the most common and definitive causes of sediment in urine. Hematuria can arise due to many causes such as kidney diseases, malfunctioning glomeruli, tumor growth in any part of the urinary system, UTIs, and renal infarcts. RBCs in urine can also arise due to passage of kidney stones into the bladder, physical injury or trauma to the urinary tract, or extensive use of urinary catheters.
    • Urinary tract conditions: Diseases of the urinary tract can also cause sediment in urine. Such sediments may have proteins, leukocytes, bacteria, white blood cells, etc. Proteinuria or protein in urine can be caused due to many reasons, while bacteria in urine primarily occurs due to UTIs. It may be noted that people with UTIs tend to elicit elevated levels of sediment in urine as opposed to healthy individuals.
    • Casts: Casts can be cells with abnormal shape, or sections of cells, or just crud. The presence of casts in urine sediment may indicate a serious health abnormality and hence requires immediate medical attention.




    October 31, 2013
    From the December 2013 Issue of Renal And Urology News ?
    Renacidin Irrigation Back for Use Against Kidney, Bladder Stones

    After being sidelined for the past year and a half due to manufacturing issues, Renacidin Irrigation is available once again. The solution, which consists of citric acid, glucono-delta-lactone, and magnesium carbonate, is indicated for the dissolution of renal and vesical calculi of the apatite or struvite variety. There is no alternative product for this indication.

    FDA information shows that as of June 30, 2012, Renacidin Irrigation manufacturer United-Guardian, Inc. did not expect the product to be available again until November 2013 due to production problems as noted in United-Guardian earnings statements issued in August 2012 and forward.

    United-Guardian President Ken Globus announced that, as expected, the company is now able to provide Renacidin Irrigation again. In addition, United-Guardian is developing a more convenient single-dose unit of the product that should obtain FDA approval sometime in 2014.

    Renacidin Irrigation is indicated for use by local irrigation in the dissolution of kidney stones composed of apatite or struvite in patients who are not candidates for surgical removal of the calculi. It can also be used as an adjunctive therapy to dissolve residual apatite or struvite calculi and fragments after surgery or to partially dissolve kidney stones prior to surgical removal. In addition, the product can dissolve apatite or struvite stones in the bladder by means of local intermittent irrigation through a urethral catheter or cystostomy catheter as an alternative or adjunct to surgical procedures.

    Renacidin Irrigation also is indicated for use as an intermittent irrigating solution to prevent or minimize incrustations of indwelling urinary tract catheters.
    From the December 2013 Issue of Renal And Urology News ?

    After being sidelined for the past year and a half due to manufacturing issues, Renacidin Irrigation is available once again. The solution, which consists of citric acid, glucono-delta-lactone, and magnesium carbonate, is indicated for the dissolution of renal and vesical calculi of the apatite or struvite variety. There is no alternative product for this indication.

    FDA information shows that as of June 30, 2012, Renacidin Irrigation manufacturer United-Guardian, Inc. did not expect the product to be available again until November 2013 due to production problems as noted in United-Guardian earnings statements issued in August 2012 and forward.

    United-Guardian President Ken Globus announced that, as expected, the company is now able to provide Renacidin Irrigation again. In addition, United-Guardian is developing a more convenient single-dose unit of the product that should obtain FDA approval sometime in 2014.

    Renacidin Irrigation is indicated for use by local irrigation in the dissolution of kidney stones composed of apatite or struvite in patients who are not candidates for surgical removal of the calculi. It can also be used as an adjunctive therapy to dissolve residual apatite or struvite calculi and fragments after surgery or to partially dissolve kidney stones prior to surgical removal. In addition, the product can dissolve apatite or struvite stones in the bladder by means of local intermittent irrigation through a urethral catheter or cystostomy catheter as an alternative or adjunct to surgical procedures. Renacidin is Citric Acid, Glucono delta-Lactone, and Magnesium Carbonate

    Renacidin Irrigation also is indicated for use as an intermittent irrigating solution to prevent or minimize incrustations of indwelling urinary tract catheters.

    From Care Cure Forums:
    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...3421-Renacidin This is a 2010 thread. Renacidin is not over the counter. You must have a prescription for it from your doctor. This 2010 post estimates the cost of Renacidin at $33 per 500ml bottle.

    All the best,
    GJ

  4. #4
    Said well, my friend.
    CKF

  5. #5
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Windsor ON Canada
    Posts
    19,320
    I would add diet to that list. Water is safe .. everything else, not so much! At least I've found that as I get older. Carbonated drinks or powdered drink mixes are the worst - 'powder in, powder out.' All of my bed rest lately also shows an increased amount of sediment .. I suspect there's something about stopping drinking for hours for sleep AND my awful hours of wake/sleep that are totally out of whack.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    I would add diet to that list.
    I have noticed that dairy products increase my sediment. However, since I've taking B-12 Complex, Vitamin D and Potassium my urine looks like water with a few drops of food coloring in it. It's almost spooky clear. I use external caths though so I don't know if it'll help. Might be worth a try though.


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-31-2011, 12:06 PM
  2. An engineer loads his wheelchair
    By SCIfor55+yrs. in forum Equipment
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-31-2010, 07:19 PM
  3. Fake Firefox/Adobe Update page loads virus
    By betheny in forum Computers
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-01-2010, 06:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •