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Thread: Linux saves the day

  1. #1

    Linux saves the day

    Just a comment on UBUNTU - I spent a few hours helping a nephew retrieve course work from the HD from an old Thinkpad. Went to a local pc shop and after the tech there determined that the drive was still working I bought a usb enclosure and tried to open the files in Windows XP - no good - it saw the drive but would not make the files visible, Luckily I had a UBUNTU install on the same pc. I cranked up UBUNTU ( I think it's version 11.10?) and was able to retrieve all the files he needed and placed them on a usb thumb drive.
    I wish I could stop using Windows completely.. i would if I didn't have to use it for business!

  2. #2
    [SIZE=14px]Hello Garvey,

    I am the same with Linux and Ubuntu. I dual boot so unless I have to use Windows, I always boot Linux. Very fast and very reliable...no virus's and never defragging. If anyone is interested, go here and decide for yourself: http://www.whylinuxisbetter.net

    Good luck.
    [/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Dual booting is a PIA so I simply run a Unbuntu 12.04 Virtual Machine inside of my windows laptop. I would reverse the two but windows has better battery management than linux. I spend 90% of my time inside of the linux VM, with it maximized it it like having a Linux laptop, one click to minimize it and I am back in windows.

  4. #4
    Senior Member da lurker's Avatar
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    I put the free linix operating system Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on an old (xp compatible) computer I found in a dumpster and it works great, once I kinda figured it out. It works just like windows... just different,,, gets on the internet just the same, downloads utube just the same, hulu works, can buy crap on ebay just the same, edit audio/video stuff. This is starting to look like a relief since microsoft is abandoning XP and I can't find some Win7 drivers for some of the old devices. Microsoft recommends people with old computers like me simply buy a new computer.... probably in a few years I'll be finding win7 computers in dumpsters

    There may be some limitations but as for me and my needs I haven't seen any.
    tom


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  5. #5
    Senior Member zagam's Avatar
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    Dual booting does not work well with Microsoft Windows as if any thing changes it stops working. Windows is to hard to run on bare metal. I use qemu-kvm on 64bit GNU/Linux. You can freeze any thing and roll back. Used to have BOOTCAMP and Windows 7e 64bit. Did not have much luck after migrating to VMware fusion on OSX , but current set up is stable. Parallels Desktop was not much fun either. Running 32bit WinXP as smaller foot print. This is enough to run the Windows version Office which incompatible with the Mac version and IE8 the last supported version of IE without wasting too much of my time. Blew away Windows 7e in OSX for more disc space.

    There is a version of IE for OSX 10.3. It was also a joke. It was good for screen shots to shame IE only sites. I always informed the owners.

    I use LibreOffice on OSX and GNU/Linux as this is more compatible with the Windows versions of Office.

    Debian GNU/Linux did not just saved the day it saved my sanity. Has been my desktop and server OS this century. (Still have OS 8.6, OSX 10.3 (G3), 10.6, 10.9 (Intel), but no Windows on bare metal or network. My G4 runs Debian GNU/Linux only.)

  6. #6
    Senior Member zagam's Avatar
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    Question You need an OS manage power

    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    windows has better battery management than linux


    GNU/Linux is a free (as in freedom) work alike of Unix. Unix is an OS. When Unix processes yield they do not run until unblocked. When all are blocked CPU can be tuned off and cool down until an external even such a packet or key press wakes it up again. With the CPU being cool it can then run at full speed. I.e. power management in GNU/Linux speeds the system up where as power management in Microsoft Windows slows it down.

    Apple OSX is a certified and licensed Unix system, but I use Linux as its more Unixy.

    In Microsoft Windows the CPU is thermally limited. This compromise between performance and system failure. On battery you have compromise between performance and battery life.

    In Debian task-laptop pulls acpi user land. It could be that Ubuntu uses rock bottom proprietary display drivers. I only use official Debian main (free) ones, but some times need to use non-free firmware.

    Unix is OS. Other examples of an OS include firmware in battery powered pocket calculators, the Apollo Guidance Computer and IBM System/390. A calculator wakes up on key press and when processing complete and display updated it goes to sleep. There is dedicated hardware to reverse the LCD current. The CPU is off. When CMOS mainframes first hit the scene their performance was not as good as the older bipolar processors, but when doing DMA IO the CMOS CPU was off and cooled down. The IBM engineers realised that they could over clock it in short bursts and be faster than the older processors. CMOS processors require an OS, which Microsoft Windows is not.

    Slowing bipolar processors down like the Apollo Guidance Computer did not save that much power, but it did save some.

  7. #7
    I am not quite sure what point you are trying to make but my direct experience with booting into Ubuntu vs Windows 7 is that the battery lasts longer in Window 7. I am sure it could be fixed by playing with ACPI, I have enough knowledge to do it myself if I had the time. I also like to buy the latest laptop hardware and the linux drivers for those tend to lag. Given all that, I simply boot into windows then run a linux VM full screen when I need to do development.

    Thanks for the bizarre non-sequitor OS lecture as well, although Windows is an OS just like Unix.

    Quote Originally Posted by zagam View Post


    GNU/Linux is a free (as in freedom) work alike of Unix. Unix is an OS. When Unix processes yield they do not run until unblocked. When all are blocked CPU can be tuned off and cool down until an external even such a packet or key press wakes it up again. With the CPU being cool it can then run at full speed. I.e. power management in GNU/Linux speeds the system up where as power management in Microsoft Windows slows it down.

    Apple OSX is a certified and licensed Unix system, but I use Linux as its more Unixy.

    In Microsoft Windows the CPU is thermally limited. This compromise between performance and system failure. On battery you have compromise between performance and battery life.

    In Debian task-laptop pulls acpi user land. It could be that Ubuntu uses rock bottom proprietary display drivers. I only use official Debian main (free) ones, but some times need to use non-free firmware.

    Unix is OS. Other examples of an OS include firmware in battery powered pocket calculators, the Apollo Guidance Computer and IBM System/390. A calculator wakes up on key press and when processing complete and display updated it goes to sleep. There is dedicated hardware to reverse the LCD current. The CPU is off. When CMOS mainframes first hit the scene their performance was not as good as the older bipolar processors, but when doing DMA IO the CMOS CPU was off and cooled down. The IBM engineers realised that they could over clock it in short bursts and be faster than the older processors. CMOS processors require an OS, which Microsoft Windows is not.

    Slowing bipolar processors down like the Apollo Guidance Computer did not save that much power, but it did save some.

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