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Thread: Contemplating a big move...

  1. #41
    I would not recommend the US as an option, if I were you I would consider only countries with single payer national health care for which you as emigrants would be eligible (if there are countries meeting both criteria). If the midterms here result in a Republican senate and the 2016 election results in a Republican president there won't be an ACA shortly thereafter. Be aware that you will be moving to a near oligarchy where women's personal health care choices hang by a thread, where guns are objects of worship, where minorities are continuously scapegoated, where cops can kill with impunity and where big money totally dominates politics. I know next to nothing about the political/social realities where you live but the US is not what you remember or envision.

  2. #42
    Re: "Be aware that you will be moving to a near oligarchy where women's personal health care choices hang by a thread, where guns are objects of worship, where minorities are continuously scapegoated, where cops can kill with impunity and where big money totally dominates politics."

    Nailed it, ancientgimp ! But I love this song:

    You say you're not from Texas
    Man as if I couldn't tell
    You think you pull your boots on right
    And wear your hat so well

    So pardon me my laughter
    'Cause I sure do understand
    Even Moses got excited
    When he saw the promised land

    That's right you're not from Texas
    That's right you're not from Texas
    That's right you're not from Texas
    But Texas wants you anyway

    Lyle Lovett
    Last edited by 2drwhofans; 10-07-2014 at 07:00 PM.

  3. #43
    I guess I'll never leave CT. But I do hate it here, the representatives only cares about themselves and their pals just like our goverment. If I ever did have a way, meaning decent housing and care, it would definitly be North Carolina for me.
    Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.
    Bob Seger

  4. #44
    I wanted to clarify something I learned about today.

    Your husband has to be a legal resident / Green Card holder to sign up for an ACA health plan. BUT he will not qualify for any subsidies based on your joint income until he has lived here for at least 5 years or until he becomes a citizen. So he will have to pay the full cost of the premium. Premiums are based on age and the type of plan your choose. Higher deductible plans tend to have lower monthly premiums, for example, but at least all plans cover a similar array of services. And the older you are, the higher the premium.

    You can start applying for citizenship once you are here, but that takes years, from what I hear.
    Last edited by hlh; 10-08-2014 at 12:43 AM.

  5. #45
    I think the original poster (elarson) is herself an American citizen for whatever that is worth to the discussion.

    All the best,
    GJ

  6. #46
    Was talking about her husband. We were discussing before about when to apply for a Green card for him (ASAP....), and I had thought a Green card alone would qualify him for full ACA coverage, but it does not. Full ACA coverage with subsidies is only for citizens and permanent residents/green card holders here at least 5 years.

  7. #47
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    @ancientgimp, I realise the US is not what I remember or envision, but I also know that I need to weigh it all up based on our situation. Here are some thoughts if you are interested:

    ACA: I just don't think that is going to happen at this point without major backlash, especially in the more socially liberal states, which are the only we are considering. Where I live now they are rolling back on many previous promises, and I "think" the situation will be similar here in not too many years, after paying a huge amount of taxes and not having time to save a good nest-egg to deal with it.

    Minorities being scapegoated: It has been happening here since the early 2000's. It's a small country, so people may not be so aware of it in other countries, but it causes me daily problems. Xenophobia is rife, and and strong signs of fascism are gripping Europe once again. I'll take my chances as a US citizen with a Europen partner in the US, because I see the other option here much worse. My partner feels the same way, because he has always been treated better in the US than I have been here -- a lot of that I blame G.W. Bush for. Google "Geert Wilders" if you are curious.

    Cops acting with impunity: Although I do not fear that the cops will shoot me here, they have already caused me physical bodily harm, which I believe was completely because I was not Dutch. Although they later apologised, they did nothing to compensate me, and the police agent was never reprimanded. In our most recent situation where someone stole a significant amount of money from my husband 3 weeks ago, after incapacitating him with a drug overdose, there are no signs that the police have or will take any action. There is very little accountability for any government services, including medical care and negligence, and we have been the victims of it too many times.

    Women's health: I will not consider living in a state that is fundamental religiously driven. I lived in Chicago and Boston for many years and overall felt less sexism even back then than I do now. The Netherlands is very far behind in women holding positions of power, except in a few instances like legal and healthcare. For the rest, it is an old boys network. Granted, that is not health care, but the impact it has on my daily life and earning capability is stifling.

    Money dominating politics: It happens here also, but just on a lesser scale, but relatively equally pervasive and getting worse. It is only recently that parties even need to declare where their funding comes from, and it's clear that it is not transparent.

    Guns are objects of worship: Probably my biggest concern in moving back to the US is the gun and violence culture. For that, I really do believe that Europe has it right, and I will miss that sense of security and not looking over my back all the time. This is something I just can't understand the average American wanting to put up with, and is a constant source of confusion for me. I guess we'll just have to take our chances on that...
    Last edited by elarson; 10-08-2014 at 06:04 PM.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  8. #48
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of your input @hlh.

    Everything I am reading is that my husband will be able to purchase marketplace health insurance and receive tax credits without a waiting period, as long as he is a lawful permanent resident (LPR/Green Card holder) and we are married and filing jointly and fit the income requirements. He would be eligible for Medicaid after 5 years, or 3 years if he applies for naturalization, based on being married to a U.S. citizen. He probably would not be eligible for Medicaid due to his long-term disability benefits he receives until he is 65 years old through a reciprocal social security treaty with the Netherlands. After 65 years old I am not sure exactly how it works. From what I am reading about Medicare eligibility, if either an individual or their spouse worked for ten or more years and paid money into the system, then we both are covered in the same way with similar costs. Now to figure out pensions...

    About some of the other places people have mentioned, places like California and Hawaii would be on the list, except for the high cost of living. New England would also be on the list, despite the cost of living, but the weather is pretty harsh. About the south east (North Carolina or Atlanta), I really don't see us fitting in, even if there are "pockets" of social liberalism. In general, I have ruled out any state that did not do Medicaid expansion, because in my view it pretty much speaks for itself for what their priorities are for their citizens well being. We are still considering the UK, but they are also going through fairly drastic austerity measures, and I as a US citizen as the primary breadwinner will have challenges there. Had we not been hit with disability, we would be considering more options....

    Quote Originally Posted by hlh View Post
    I wanted to clarify something I learned about today...
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  9. #49
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    I went over your list on the first page and still think that Oregon (Portland area) meets all of your requirements. The only drawback is the rain, but today the weather is 77 degrees and sunny. You can get used to the rain and you don't have to shovel it like you do snow.
    Certain areas of Portland are somewhat sketchy, but it is easy to avoid them Yamhill county is the cheapest place for property tax in the Portland area, and you can find country property within a half hour of downtown Portland. You are between the mountains and the sea. There are numerous activities that will give you opportunities for outdoor recreation and fun. Most of the state is rural in character. Stay away from the cities outside of the Portland area as there are still employment issues. Lack of jobs. I live in Eugene and there is a pall of unemployment over the city.

    Public transportation in the surrounding Portland are and in Portland are excellent. Some areas in Portland can be expensive, but a little research can get you a place to be.
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  10. #50
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Thanks for your input skippy13. I'm just curious, are there any coastal area's that are reasonable for property tax, and near at least a somewhat decent medical center? We are not looking for the beach life, but are both sailors and looking to be near the water if at all possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by skippy13 View Post
    I went over your list on the first page and still think that Oregon (Portland area) meets all of your requirements. The only drawback is the rain, but today the weather is 77 degrees and sunny. You can get used to the rain and you don't have to shovel it like you do snow.
    Certain areas of Portland are somewhat sketchy, but it is easy to avoid them Yamhill county is the cheapest place for property tax in the Portland area, and you can find country property within a half hour of downtown Portland. You are between the mountains and the sea. There are numerous activities that will give you opportunities for outdoor recreation and fun. Most of the state is rural in character. Stay away from the cities outside of the Portland area as there are still employment issues. Lack of jobs. I live in Eugene and there is a pall of unemployment over the city.

    Public transportation in the surrounding Portland are and in Portland are excellent. Some areas in Portland can be expensive, but a little research can get you a place to be.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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