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Thread: Contemplating a big move...

  1. #21
    The only problem with Atlanta is that it is made up of very steep hills, no way to move around on a manual chair

  2. #22
    Senior Member tarheelandy's Avatar
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    You've got that right!

  3. #23
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Just wanted to mention that we are still researching this. We "think" we have narrowed it down to the pacific northwest, west of the cascades.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  4. #24
    Spokane area perhaps?

    (KLD)

  5. #25
    That is a beautiful area of the country. A friend of mine who is a nurse just moved to Bend, Oregon a couple years ago after years of researching. Her husband is disabled, but he has fewer needs than your husband. She is still working, and wants to continue working and retire in the same place. There is a pretty good hospital there (St. Charles Medical Center).

    Maybe I missed this.... but health insurance and $$ to pay for home help for your husband? I hope you have a very big cushion of savings, or maybe I'm missing something...

    Fortunately you work in a really great field with potential job options and flexibility.

    Would you still get health insurance via your remote employer in the US, and your husband would be covered too? If you lost that job, you could get insurance on the marketplace, but that could add up in cost.... I think he will qualify for Medicare eventually if you have worked in the US/contributed to Medicare for 10 years (40 quarters), but I would look into how quickly he could access that after immigrating. For example.... maybe he has to become a citizen, then apply formally for disability if you have enough SS/Medicaid quarters, then wait 2 years, then he will get it? Not sure...

    So many people are marginally employed right now, I am just scared for you to be walking away from any safety net that is more secure than what we have here. But I guess you can always go back, right?

  6. #26
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    I hear you hlh. All your points are some of our biggest questions, which I don't yet have answers for. The problem is that I absolutely hate it here, and it was always our plan to leave before disability whacked us over the head. The longer I wait to leave, the harder it will be. I am 52 now, as is my husbband, and there is still a chance to get setup somewhere else. Care will be a definite issue, but that is being cut here a lot now also.

    Quote Originally Posted by hlh View Post
    ...I am just scared for you to be walking away from any safety net that is more secure than what we have here. But I guess you can always go back, right?
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  7. #27
    If possible, your best option would be to insure him under your employer's plan. New immigrants with "green cards" are eligible to purchase health insurance through the marketplace ( A.K.A. "Obamacare" ) but typically don't have immediate access to do Medicare buy-ins on their own. A lot may depend on your work history and whether Social Security and Medicare taxes were withheld from your pay while you were living in The Netherlands. I'd recommend consulting an immigration attorney in whichever state you plan to move regarding Medicare/Medicaid eligibility for disabled, newly, arrived, permanent U.S. residents.

    http://www.nolo.com/legal-encycloped...r-receive.html

  8. #28
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link 2drwhofans. I appreciate any and all information like this. I've been doing a lot of searching, but it helps to have others input also.

    I have been self-employed for 26 years, including my time in the Netherlands. I therefore only paid taxes where I resided -- 10 years US and then the rest in the Netherlands and a few other countries. My husband will be able to transfer his disability benefits that runt until he is 65 and then his pension after that. I think we can get his Dutch medical insurance extended about a year with an international policy on top of it.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  9. #29
    I'm so sorry you have been so miserable.... I agree that if there was ever a time to try, it's now when you are healthy, working and have time to continue saving and improving your long term plan.

    2drwhofans has a great idea of talking to an immigration attorney and very carefully reviewing all documents about what your health insurance options/benefits would be so you are fully prepared. I would also start doing some calculations..... You know what your husband's current needs are and how much care is required. Look at cost of living at these cities you are considering, your savings, your salary (if your job transfers)..... just see. Also do calculations for "worst case scenarios"...

    And then be creative... Renting/buying a place big enough with an extra bedroom that you could "rent" out in exchange for some help with homecare. Look to live in a town large enough with a university/nursing school that might attract young people that could move in to help. Or maybe you start hosting "au pairs" from the Netherlands who assist with homecare in exchange for room/board. Or maybe there is actually a helpful relative somewhere...

    I admire you for thinking about this move, and hope you can make it work.

  10. #30
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Thanks hlh. On top of doing care and working, I am just completely exhausted dealing with language and cultural differences. We also had some recent situations that I feel that me being a foreigner made it less possible to keep both of us protected. Add on top of that a general intolerance of foreigners the last 10 years, and I'm just done in. I forgot to mention, that we can stay with my brother a few months, virtually rent free, while we sort out options.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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