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Thread: Contemplating a big move...

  1. #11
    If you approach to this is similar to your systemic approach to power addons for manual wheelchairs I look forward to the results. I have a couple questions (basically to see if I can use your conclusions)

    - what is your job (I don't mean who do you work for or anything personal, just what do you do and more specifically do you work remotely)
    - The one I can't see working and moving countries is "Ability to transfer disability pay and pension". My belief is I would get whatever is due to me from social security wherever I live and my 401k and IRA are assets I own. I don't get either a pension or disability pay, do you see those two limiting you choices?

  2. #12
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Every poll I have ever seen about Germans has their ideal place to live is in the immediate Munich area and yet all other areas put down Bavarians as being country bumkins. Most American military types still cannot understand why we gave up Munich and Augsburg but not Stuttgart or Darmstadt.

    I doubt you'd have problems coming back to the US but other than Hawaii where the cost of living is very high most of the warmer states tend to be less progressive unless you live in a major university area and even then the state will still have the death penalty and bennies like accessible buses and taxis will be few and far between. I looked at my temperature control as nice warm houses and businesses versus every place in Florida blowing the AC sky high 9 months of the year every where. Of the 3 states with family Illinois is basically bankrupt. I have family there too. In many towns down state the state is not returning their taxes to run their school systems. Detroit has declared bankruptcy. Wisconsin has higher taxes and property taxes depend on where you live. We're lake front on Madison's largest lake so ours is high but so are services including almost immediate snow plowing, taxis on demand-almost always, dog parks, classical to garbage rock concerts and clubs, a growing art museum and community garden collectives including one that is accessible. Great university and health care is good and the only long wait is getting a PCP. Once you have one they are easy to get into but I can see specialists without her referring. If there is global warming I can't see it here and I grew up here!

    You might check out the triangle cities in North Carolina. Raligh, Durham and Chapel Hill but they also get hurricane wash and an occasional tornado.

  3. #13
    Your list is amazing... and daunting... and of course, likely impossible. But I am also curious what falls out in the mix.

    May I ask, what are your main disappointments with where you are now?

  4. #14
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    I currently work remotely, with some business travel. If I can, I am hoping to continue like this. Transfering disability pay and pensions depends on the country they were earned, but some like the Netherlands lower the amounts to some countries (non-EU) and not others (EU).

    Up until this year we could have also received transferred our care budget to an EU country. Unfortunately, they have stopped that now. I find it a bit unfair, because it is something we paid over $250/month in insurance for. It is also a very strong reason to stay where we are, because it is probably one of the best care budgets of any countries. Unfortunately, we also see that being cut down drastically. It went down a lot this year, and in 2015 it is very unclear what will happen.

  5. #15
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    I am absolutely sure that the list is impossible to meet all of. But, on the other hand, without some kind of an inventory, it is even more impossible ;), It is now up to about 50 things, so I think I need to break it down into separate topics spreadsheets. And I have not even started on business/employment and the specifics of what we want for a new house.

    Although the Netherlands comes in quite high for many things, we (especially me) have a long list of things we are not happy about living here. No offense to anyone, but don't believe all that you read about the tolerant Dutch. Also, it's cold and wet, with very little nature, and is very expensive. We like our house, but find that we don't really want to be part of anything outside of it, and are finding ourselves very isolated. With the exception of a few friends who visit the only family support we have is 5000+ miles away. I'm also very tired of dealing with the high level of bureaucracy (also on the list now), especially in Dutch, and my husband is only of limited help due to health issues.

  6. #16
    At least in the USA Florida and California are good places for disabled people to live, nice climate, very accessable and lot's of other disabled people for peer support. I know in Florida I run into a lot of people of European decent.

  7. #17
    Most of California is pretty accessible, but housing is very expensive (and currently rising in price in most areas), esp. if you are close to the coast, and in urban areas. Weather is a plus here, as well as an active disability community, wheelchair sports, etc. in many parts of the state. Lots of high tech & computer related jobs too, although very competitive and not always a lot of openings.

    You would not qualify for personal care attendant care funded by the state in CA (and in most USA states) such as IHSS unless you are very low income, and the spouse's income is included in this calculation.

    Unless you work for a multi-national company, I don't see how you would be able to transfer pension benefits. Once you have a job, you start paying into Social Security, and once you have 40 quarters (10 years) of paying into the system, you are eligible for benefits such as SSDI and SS payments after retirement age. Pensions are generally through an employer, and vary significantly. Many companies are currently cutting back on pension benefits right now as a result of the economic downturn of the last few years, and that is also true for government employees (local, state, and federal). As far as programs such as state disability, these are available only to those who are disabled while employed within the state, and are time limited (some pay for only 2 years post disability), and that applies only if you were working for an employer who paid into the state program for their employees.

    Very few states outside of Oregon have legal assisted suicide/euthanasia in the USA, and then only for terminal conditions. CA still technically has capital punishment, although has not had an execution in many years.

    Taxes in CA are moderate. This includes property taxes as well as state income taxes, and of course federal income tax. Sales tax is 8.5% in most areas of CA, and there is no VAT in the USA.

    You may also want to look at Arizona and New Mexico. Texas is a lot more conservative that you appear to want to deal with (and they have executions pretty often). Oregon and Washington are nice states with beautiful country, but with cooler and rainier weather than you will have in the Southwest USA. Most of the Southeast USA is hot and muggy in the summer, and gets more rain than the Southwest. Colorado is a great state, but you will have to deal with snow, although it snows less in Denver than it does in much of the rest of the state. Nevada has some but not all of what you are looking for as well, either in the Reno or Las Vegas areas.

    (KLD)

  8. #18
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    I really appreciate all the input. Thanks guys. It really helps when feeling overwhelmed by all of the "not" possibilities.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Sarafino's Avatar
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    I have been thinking about this stuff too. I am extremely isolated where I live and it's becoming more apparent as my disorder progresses that I need social interaction with other similarly disabled people, and that is never going to happen here. The social isolation is literally killing me. It sounds to me like that is also the OPs main issue with where they live. I would not be able to afford to live in any cities, though. I really don't know what to do with my life at this point. I agree with what has been said, money makes a huge difference but for many of us that is just not the case.

  10. #20
    [SIZE=14px]Hello elarson,

    One place that meets most of the criteria you listed would be Atlanta, Georgia. It has the Shepherd Center (Rehabilitation), Emory Hospital System & College, mild winters with occasional snow dusting, warm summers and very accessible. There are many cultural centers, aquariums, major league sports, world class transportation network and it is an extremely diverse city. The Atlanta metro area has a population of around 6.5 million and boast traffic (bad) second only to Los Angeles. From Atlanta International Airport (worlds busiest) you can fly to anywhere in the world. I live about 125 miles south of Atlanta but can easily go there to The Shepherd Center or Emory University Hospital network when I need to.

    Good luck.
    [/SIZE]

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