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Thread: Grasshopper Mouse

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cowboys_Place's Avatar
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    Grasshopper Mouse

    Has any one heard of or seen video of this little rodent called the grasshopper mouse who doesn't feel the pain from a scorpions sting.
    I've tried posting the link but this site won't let me it keeps throwing up an error 500
    It's on geeks.com seems researchers think that by studying it might lead too better treatment of human pain.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Cowboys_Place's Avatar
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    Thanks KLD

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    Interestingly the following article appeared recently in Science:

    Science 25 October 2013:
    Vol. 342 no. 6157 pp. 441-446
    DOI: 10.1126/science.1236451


    Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel in Grasshopper Mice Defends Against Bark Scorpion Toxin
    Ashlee H. Rowe, Yucheng Xiao, Matthew P. Rowe, Theodore R. Cummins, and Harold H. Zakon

    Abstract:

    Painful venoms are used to deter predators. Pain itself, however, can signal damage and thus serves an important adaptive function. Evolution to reduce general pain responses, although valuable for preying on venomous species, is rare, likely because it comes with the risk of reduced response to tissue damage. Bark scorpions capitalize on the protective pain pathway of predators by inflicting intensely painful stings. However, grasshopper mice regularly attack and consume bark scorpions, grooming only briefly when stung. Bark scorpion venom induces pain in many mammals (house mice, rats, humans) by activating the voltage-gated Na[SIZE=10px]+[/SIZE] channel Nav1.7, but has no effect on Nav1.8. Grasshopper mice Nav1.8 has amino acid variants that bind bark scorpion toxins and inhibit Na[SIZE=10px]+[/SIZE] currents, blocking action potential propagation and inducing analgesia. Thus, grasshopper mice have solved the predator-pain problem by using a toxin bound to a nontarget channel to block transmission of the pain signals the venom itself is initiating.

  5. #5
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    I don't know which channels are activated in us by our messed up spinal cords, but I'd like them turned off.

    A guillotine would work. Too bad there's nothing less drastic available.

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