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Thread: Asia grade D's

  1. #1

    Asia grade D's

    Would I be correct in thinking that most people who are Asia D regain some kind of walking?

  2. #2
    Many who have an AIS D category injury have enough muscle return to walk. It depends upon the actual muscles spared. Most ASIA D injuries are cervical, and this can complicate walking with assistive devices such as walkers or crutches, as some with AIS D injuries such as central cord syndrome have more impairment of their arms than their legs. There is a great deal of variabiltiy in return in the AIS D group, so not possible to generalize to all.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Central Cord Syndrome isn't normally found in non-traumatic injuries or in those with TM or MS. A larger problem for walking as ASIA Ds would be impaired balance, spasticity and eye sight problems due to brain lesions in those with TM and MS, etc. Overall though I'd say chances of walking are pretty good in non-traumatic Ds but it is not guaranteed.

  4. #4
    There are other syndromes in AIS D injuries other than just Central Cord Syndrome. This includes anterior cord syndrome, posterior cord syndrome, and Brown Sequard syndrome.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Oh yes! Sometimes I think the anterior cord group should have their own meetings. Why this is so common in atraumatic cases I still don't understand. I've only known of 2 posterior cords and both were from infarcts one of which was a C2. I believe Brown-Sequard is most common in those who have had tumors removed or other surgical work near or on the cord. central Cord is, I believe, becoming more common since the use of airbags has become fairly standard. Although I've met people with it from GSWs and motorcycle sliders too. I believe the syndrome the least understood or seen is posterior cord whether traumatic or not.

  6. #6
    I should have made clear that I meant people who were Asia B's or C's and advanced to Asia D after a year or more.Dont know if that makes much difference.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Yes, the grade you start with can impact how far you'll go. It's not everything but it does cut your chances a bit. Also whether you started as incomplete motor only or incomplete sensory and motor are more likely to gain meaningful function than those who start out as sensory only incomplete.

  8. #8
    I was an Asia B then,about three months later moved to an Asia C.No motor but sensation then motor began slowly to return.

  9. #9
    Name:  axial.jpg
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Size:  63.4 KBI'm posterior only (subacute combined degeneration C5-T2) and I can't seem to find any posterior only people. Are there any on this board? This does not look like the classic V-shape you see with SCC and it looks like it goes closer to the central cord than other SCC cases' axial images (the V-shape typically seen, tends to stay away from the central cord). I share a lot in common with central cord people but would really like to hear about other posterior cord individual's progression. Any information on this? Thanks!
    Last edited by Outlier; 10-12-2014 at 04:52 AM.

  10. #10
    Posterior cord syndrome is extremely rare. I have personally seen only 3-4 cases in my practice. It can be caused by trauma and loss of circulation to the two posterior spinal arteries, but also can be caused by tabes dorsalis (tertiary syphyllis) and vit B 12 deficiency. The symptoms in posterior cord syndrome are primarily sensory with loss of position sense (proprioception) and vibration sense the most noticeable, with a lesser degree of paralysis that with most SCI.

    (KLD)

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