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Thread: m.a.t. Muscle activation technique

  1. #1

    m.a.t. Muscle activation technique

    Hello, I've been working with a trainer once a week who has started her internship in M.A.T. Training and has as result stopped doing any resistance training, or stretching with me. The trainer insists that this modality of training is key to gaining further strength, stability and functional improvement. The program seems to be just isometric contractions, which I know is great for you, but I'm not certain that this type of training is the best use of my time with a trainer. So far, after 6 months of trying these exercises, I really don't see any real improvement. I don't want to fall victim to my own ignorance, does have any information on muscle active techniques as they relate to spinal cord injury.

  2. #2
    #1 m.a.t. Muscle activation technique Today, 01:57 AM Hello, I've been working with a trainer once a week who has started her internship in M.A.T. Training and has as result stopped doing any resistance training, or stretching with me. The trainer insists that this modality of training is key to gaining further strength, stability and functional improvement. The program seems to be just isometric contractions, which I know is great for you, but I'm not certain that this type of training is the best use of my time with a trainer. So far, after 6 months of trying these exercises, I really don't see any real improvement. I don't want to fall victim to my own ignorance, does have any information on muscle active techniques as they relate to spinal cord injury.

  3. #3
    I've never heard of "M.A.T." A quick google search took me here: http://www.muscleactivate.com/index....lay&pageID=100
    It definitely looks like it has some merit, if you have a fully functioning nervous system (aka for able bodied people who have muscle imbalances). The concept of "M.A.T." is just a flashy way of selling the idea that tight muscles are caused by an imbalanced, weaker muscle somewhere else, which is nothing new.

    However, the whole concept of correcting imbalances by strengthening weak muscles is based on the idea that you could voluntarily turn those muscles on in the first place. With a compromised nervous system like with SCI, its just not that simple. So I don't think this method has any advantage over other methods of PT or exercise, and wouldn't be surprised if it really is less effective.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMC
    The trainer insists that this modality of training is key to gaining further strength, stability and functional improvement. The program seems to be just isometric contractions, which I know is great for you, but I'm not certain that this type of training is the best use of my time with a trainer. So far, after 6 months of trying these exercises, .
    I agree that this is not the best use of your time with a physical trainer. For isometric exercises, IMO, one can just do them all the time on your own. If your can contract a muscle some were, then its good to constantly do so all day long. You can do this laying down or in your chair, wherever you are, just try to make it part of your life style. I do a lot of isometric exercises when on hand cycle rides, why not. Seems like you could get the physical trainer to help you with other stuff. Get him to show you all the isometric exercises that he wants you to do, and then tell him that you will do those on your own, and more on to other more movement oriented exercises.


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