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Thread: Aero T CAD review

  1. #1

    Aero T CAD review

    This is my first rigid chair and would appreciate any input from the experts on if everything looks good. I’ve read a lot of threads on here and want to say thank you for all the input. I’m 6’ 3” and weigh 250 lbs. I have low back and SI joint pain that doesn’t allow me to walk very far (not even 50 yards) or stand very long. I can walk around my house but use my chair when I go out. I chose the Aero T for its adjustability. I am going to change the foot width to 14”. I was curios about 24 vs. 25/26 tires. I couldn’t find any threads about this but my search abilities are not very good.

  2. #2
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    I'm not an expert so I won't offer any thoughts on the CAD. (I also can't make it large enough to be readable, which might be the board misbehaving, IDK.)

    The search function doesn't seem to be finding old (pre-update) threads at the moment, at least when I try it, so I'm not surprised you couldn't find much about rear wheel sizes!

    In brief, the conventional wisdom that you'll hear from therapists and salespeople is that bigger wheels are for taller people, that guys over six foot should be looking at wheels bigger than the 'standard' 24" (but that small female people like me ought to have 24"s, tops). The general wisdom that you'll hear from anyone who works with wheels is that bigger wheels are harder to get going but easier to keep going, but that unless you're choosing wheel size based on the need to accelerate well (eg for wheelchair rugby) then a difference in diameter of an inch or so isn't going to be very noticeable. Now, the wisdom that you'll get on this board is a little different from what the therapists and salespeople tend to say. There are at least a few people here (~Lin and myself, for starters) who've noticed that we can't get our fingertips anywhere near the wheel hubs when sitting up straight. For me, it's because my elbows don't straighten. For ~Lin, as far as I know, it's just that she's a smaller person with correspondingly shorter arms. Not being able to touch the hubs suggests that the configuration of the chair is non-ideal for pushing efficiency. If you can't fix that by lowering the rear seat height, then trying bigger wheels makes sense. I use 25"s now, and would never go back (though it's possible there are 26"s in my future). There are a number of people on this board who've tried 25"s for various reasons and like them better than their old 24"s. That's not exactly scientific evidence, though, I know. Try 'em out, if you possibly can.

    The physical facts for bigger wheels are, of course, that going to bigger wheels unavoidably raises the minimum rear seat height you can achieve with your chair. They take up more space and weigh a little more. Some wheelchair manufacturers do not offer larger wheels, particularly 25"s. Tyre options get more limited the bigger you go, with the exception that if you go for 25"s then the whole world of mountain bike tyres reportedly opens up for you (and if you go for the biggest wheelchair wheels you can get, 700C, you have road bike tyre options, I believe). Not all wheel brands offer all sizes, for instance Round Betty Dinos are available in 24" or 25" but not 26".

    Most adults get by perfectly well with 24" rear wheels, but that's not to say that another size might not suit them better if they were able to try out the options.

    Are you planning to use a cushion that you already have on this chair? It's important to consider how well the chair's configuration can accommodate your choice of cushion without messing up the relationship you want with your chair and your wheels. Since you walk, it's possible that you're envisaging eschewing a cushion and sitting on the bare seat sling. Admittedly, I miss the days when I could do that--I sat lower and felt safer, more connected to my chair, more 'grounded'. Ultimately, I began using the chair enough of the time, and lost enough of the muscle 'padding' on my butt due to a delightful combination of muscle disease and disuse that I HAD to start using a cushion. The transition was not pretty, because even the thinnest acceptable cushion changed the relationship between me and my chair that I was used to and I hated it. It would have been much better for me had I used a cushion all along--which could only have happened had the impact of the proposed cushion on the chair config been taken into account BEFORE the chair was ordered and assembled.

    Just my two cents' worth. Hopefully the real experts will chime in about your CAD. :-)

  3. #3
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    I managed to get it to display larger. (Brought up the picture, right-clicked, chose 'Open Image in New Window', and that brought up a nice big version.) So I will offer some very generic comments.

    So it's an 18x19", 80 degree front (do you get pain if your legs are more 'tucked'?), 2 degrees camber, 24" TiLite Shadow wheels, 19" FSH, 17" RSH, 2.5" COG with 5" casters.

    That seems like pretty minimal dump, given the length of the seat sling. Would pain prevent you from having more dump? Many people feel more comfortable and secure with more dump, but of course there are exceptions (and a limit to how much dump is comfortable. Some sports chairs are so dumpy I think they might kill me ;-)

    5" casters are a good choice for grass, gravel, etc. Is that the kind of terrain you'll be encountering often? Treaded tyres are also suited to that, but many people whose days are spent mainly indoors and on nice flat streets prefer smoother, narrower tyres, and these days Schwalbe Marathon Plus Evolution tyres seem to be the top choice for treaded.

    Have you measured your doorways to ensure that 2 degrees of camber isn't going to be a problem? My main chair is a 16" with 4 degrees camber, 25" wheels, and if it were even an inch wider I don't think I'd be able to use the sliding door from my bedroom to the patio.

    14" still sounds like a generous footrest, but if there's any possibility you're going to want to use this chair with a FreeWheel in the future, remember that you need, IDK, at least an extra inch so that you can comfortably get the FW to attach between your feet.

    How do you feel about the 'footprint' of this chair? Do you have any interest in trying to shorten the proposed wheelbase?

  4. #4
    I'm 6'1" and float between 187 to 190 lbs and I roll on 24's. I tried 26's I think it was years ago but didn't like them, so I went back to 24's.

  5. #5
    I'm 5'8", 200#, and I stand to transfer (and walk some). I love my flip-back footrest for standing (footrest type is not shown on your CAD). I like having 25/559 wheels more than 24/540. I have 3.5" dump over 16" seat depth (18 FSH x 14.5 RSH). I like having the extra dump. My AeroZ originally had 2.5". I subsequently raised FSH by 1/2" and lowered RSH 1/2" to get the extra inch. Because of the dump I must scoot my butt to the front of the chair to stand, but I like it that way.

  6. #6
    6'3" myself. I'd go with the 25" without hesitation. With the dump you're putting in and your height, the 559's would be much better for you ergonomically.

  7. #7
    QTiPi…My current chair is a hospital type Breezy 510 with no adjustability. I do plan on using a cushion. I didn’t use a cushion at first until someone suggested it (my current cushion is two couch pillows) and it felt better on my shoulders being up higher but I am getting a different cushion.

    The demo chair had an 85 degree front end and I didn’t care for my feet being tucked under. I don’t get leg pain but some back pain. I’m glad I was able to try an 85. I would move my feet back on current footrest but my feet hit the casters.


    The front casters are something I’m on the fence with. If I go with 4” and didn’t like them then I could get 5’s and raise the FSH a half inch which would give me more dump if I wanted. The dump is something I haven’t experienced except on the demo chair(which was an Aero T) and I didn’t ask what that was set at. So I really can’t give any opinions on that. The time I spent on the demo chair flew by. I just figured that my current chair has none so any could be better. I agree that the two inch dump is on the minimal side. I thought the rep said that there would be 2 ½ “s of adjustment on the RSH. The demo chair specs are 16.5 RSH an 19 FSH. He was going to use the demo chair specs because the demo fit really good. Something I need to address. Good catch

    My doorways are 31”s or wider so if I need inside I’ll be good.

    The foot width on the demo was 14” and it felt fine. I told them 16 with a 2” taper and a 2” taper isn’t possible…brain fart on my part. You gotta love the fog from the medication. I don’t like my feet real close together plus I wear a size 14 in shoes and will be getting a freewheel. I live in a small town where the side roads are oiled then chipped. My wife and I take our dog for a mile walk daily and with the smaller casters a Freewheel will be a must to navigate the side roads.

    The footprint on this chair is about 6” shorter than the chair I’m using so anything shorter is a good thing…plus being 6’3” I’m kinda use to being cramped in certain situations and thought my chair wouldn’t be much different. It really hasn’t been that bad in my current chair. When something is in my way I just move it to make room.

    While typing this response I remembered that the wheels on the demo chair were 25’s and I didn’t know it until the rep asked me what I thought about them…there is that famous fog that chas talks about..lol It had the shox tires and I didn’t care for those so I’ll stay with the pneumatic tires. I haven’t got a flat yet and going on 10 months with them. I want to try the right runs and get a spare set of mountain bike tires/rims. 25’s it will be.


    Chas…when I first read about your flip back footrest I thought that would be ideal but then when you stated you couldn’t get a Freewheel then that changed my mind. I think I will need the freewheel for my situation. The demo had the flip back footrest and I didn’t have any problems getting in and out of the chair with it being down but that was also with the 85 front angle. I’ll just go with the angle adjustable assuming that the Freewheel will work with that.

    The rep and I will be getting together for the final dimensions so I will post the final drawing.

    Thanks again for all the input. This site has been very informative and helpful. It was nice to hear from other 6’3” people.

  8. #8
    At 6'3" 250 lbs. you may want to reconsider getting an 80 degree frame angle on an Aero T with a 19" seat depth. That is a very long frame, and you may find that the front end will tip forward if you push off of the front frame when you come to a standing position. It will become more of a problem if you use 5" casters. A 19" front STF height is also very low for someone who is 6'3" tall. The specific cushion you intend to use is critical to determining your best STF. For comparison's sake, this is a 17x16+1 85 degree Aero T with 5" front casters and 24x1 rear wheels...




    Given your weight and the design of TiLite's angle adjustable footplate, you are asking for problems if you intend to use a FreeWheel. There is a significant possibility that the footrest will bend. Life would be much easier with one of the titanium tubular footrests.

    ‹Before I could address things further, I would need to know the seat depth of the demo Aero T. It would be a mistake to spec an 80 degree angle because you were uncomfortable with an 85 degree frame angle if the demo had a seat depth of 17 or 18".

  9. #9
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    I don't know yet about 25s since I still haven't tried/gotten any! With all the effort its taking to get them they better be miraculous lol.

    Your dump looks incredibly minimal with the long seat depth. But too much dump could be worse on your back, so thats something I'd try out. You could build up the front of your seat under your cushion to test it out. I wanted more dump to better carry things on my lap without them sliding to the floor. I increased it SLIGHTLY using a cushion that allowed for more immersion in the back, and while I do like the slight increase for many reasons it also increases my hip pain personally so I couldn't go with any more. I have a pretty wide footrest/front as well as I don't keep my feet together usually again due to my hips.

    You definitely need to know what kind of cushion you're going with to make sure the specs of your chair are perfect. Otherwise its a huge pain in the ass finding the right cushion to work both for you and your current chair. I've had this struggle as medicaid only covered the most basic general use foam cushion which turned out to be incredibly painful for me to use. Little by little I've tried better cushions I was able to procure but its taken me over a year and a half due to finances. And the reason I'm getting larger wheels is as qtipi was mentioning where my rsh can't go any lower, so tall cushions make that problem worse!

  10. #10
    SCI_OTR, I just got the seat cushion info from the seating clinic...a Jay 2 18x20 (don’t know the thickness are they all the same) and the seat depth of the demo chair is 18”. The demo chair # is 11929420. I was curious if the 80 degree would be tippy but didn’t know the 5” casters would affect it. I was going with the larger caster due to the area I’m in but if 4” would be better I’m ok with that. I will get the freewheel so anything rough I’ll put that on. Will the titanium footrest with the abs cover work? Thanks for your help

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