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Thread: Warm weather and pain

  1. #1
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    Warm weather and pain

    Is there any studies on how warm weather helps pain? I know a few quads in Canada go south for the winter to enjoy the heat and being able to enjoy the outdoors vs being stuck inside cause of the cold and snow. I need to find something in writing or a study that was done if one exists.

  2. #2
    [SIZE=12px]Here is something[/SIZE][SIZE=12px]. In response to warm weather, the body produces something called Heat Shock Proteins.[/SIZE]


    Auburn University Theses and Dissertations, 2013. Changes in Concentrations of Heat Shock Protein 60, 70 and 90 of a Wild Songbird in Responses to Distinct Stress Challenges. Fu X, Hill G, Hood W, Wada H. Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA. Wild songbirds, such as the House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) require physiological mechanisms to maintain the homeostasis in face of stress threats. One of the primary mechanisms to protect system integrity is production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Heat shock proteins belong to chaperone families that play key roles in supervising the folding structures of proteins, helping vertebrates to suppress and degrade denatured proteins in multiple stressful environments. HSP90, HSP70 and HSP60 are three major HSP families that have been used as biomarkers of stress in a wide range of vertebrates. In my thesis, I used heat shock protein concentrations of male House Finches to evaluate the responses of wild songbirds under multiple stressful environments: thermal stress, disturbance stress and pathogen stresses. My study is the first study to compare different HSPs responses of wild songbird under sequential and distinct stressful environments. HSP concentrations from blood samples of birds were measured by western blot assay and were adjusted by internal controls to counteract variations in western blotting efficiency. Male house finches were trapped a feeding stations in Arizona in hot and cool weather. Birds were then transported to aviary and kept in cages to experience sequential stresses. In chapter one, we evaluated the HSPs responses of wild male house finches in response to thermal stress. Through comparisons of the HSP concentrations in response to hot versus cool weather condition, we found that both HSP70 and HSP60 showed significantly increased concentrations in hot weather, while concentration of HSP90 did not change. The results demonstrated that HSP70 and HSP60 were sensitive in response to thermal stress and HSP70 can be a reliable indicator of thermal stress of male house finches in wild. In chapter two, male house finches were transported to Auburn, AL from Arizona by van. We then measured the HSP responses of birds under sequential and distinct stressful environments: hot weather, transportation, recovery period, and MG (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) pathogen infection. Results showed that all HSPs-HSP90, HSP70 and HSP60-had significantly different responses of changes in concentrations across those the four conditions. Although the responses of the three heat shock proteins varied, concentrations of all three HSPs were highest in MG-infection condition. MG infection was demonstrated to have the most significant effect on HSP responses. In addition, due to different concentration pattern of each HSP, studies of different stressors should choose different HSPs.

    Induction of Heat Shock Protein 72, which is a part of the HSP70 family, is associated with a reduction in pain.


    1. Anesth Analg. 2013 Feb;116(2):482-90. doi: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e318274e4a0. Epub 2013 Jan 9. Physical exercise induces excess hsp72 expression and delays the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia in painful diabetic neuropathy rats. Chen YW, Hsieh PL, Chen YC, Hung CH, Cheng JT. Department of Physical Therapy, China Medical University, No. 91 Hsueh-Shih Rd., Taichung 40402, Taiwan. cywhwok@mail.cmu.edu.tw BACKGROUND: The underlying mechanism of exercise on the development of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain is not well understood. We investigated in rats whether exercise regulates the functional recovery and heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 expression in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: normal sedentary rats, normal rats with exercise, sedentary STZ-diabetic (SS) rats, and STZ-diabetic rats with exercise. Diabetes was induced with STZ (65 mg/kg IV). The trained rats ran daily on a treadmill 30 to 60 min/d with an intensity of 20 to 25 m/min. We monitored thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold as well as Hsp72, TNF-α, and IL-6 expression in the spinal cord and peripheral nerves. RESULTS: Two weeks after STZ injection, sedentary rats exhibited a marked and sustained hypersensitivity to von Frey tactile and heat stimuli. In contrast, diabetic rats undergoing exercise demonstrated delayed progress of tactile and thermal hypersensitivity. Exercise significantly suppressed diabetes-induced blood glucose levels and body weight loss, although they were not restored to control levels. Compared with normal sedentary rats, SS rats displayed significantly higher TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the spinal cord and peripheral nerves. The STZ-diabetic rats with exercise group showed greater Hsp72 expression and similar TNF-α or IL-6 level compared with the SS group in the spinal cord and peripheral nerves on day 14 after STZ treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that progressive exercise training markedly decreases diabetes-associated neuropathic pain, including thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. In rats, this protective effect is related to the increase of Hsp72, but not TNF-α and IL-6, expression in the spinal cord and peripheral nerves of STZ-induced diabetes.
    1. Anesth Analg. 2012 Jun;114(6):1330-7. doi: 10.1213/ANE.0b013e31824c4ed4. Epub 2012 Mar 13. Exercise training attenuates neuropathic pain and cytokine expression after chronic constriction injury of rat sciatic nerve. Chen YW, Li YT, Chen YC, Li ZY, Hung CH. Department of Physical Therapy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. BACKGROUND: The underlying mechanism of exercise on neuropathic pain is not well understood. We investigated whether physical exercise regulates the functional recovery and heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interlukin-1β (IL-1β) expression after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 7 groups: control, sham operated (SO), SO with swimming or treadmill exercise (SOSE or SOTE), CCI, CCI with swimming or treadmill exercise (CCISE or CCITE). We recorded body weight, thermal withdrawal latency, and mechanical withdrawal threshold as well as Hsp72, TNF-α, and IL-1β expression in sciatic nerve. RESULTS: The body weights in the control and SO groups were heavier than those in the SOSE, SOTE, CCI, CCISE, and CCITE groups. CCI rats with swimming or treadmill exercise showed significant increase in thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold when compared with CCI rats without exercise on day 21 after CCI. Both CCISE and CCITE groups demonstrated greater Hsp72 expression and lower TNF-α or IL-1β level than did the CCI group in sciatic nerve on day 21 after CCI. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that progressive exercise training decreases peripheral neuropathic pain as well as TNF-α and IL-1β overproduction and increases HSP72 expression after CCI of the sciatic nerve.

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