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Thread: Kishi, et al. (2001): Suicidal ideation among patients during the rehabilitation period after life-threatening physical illness

  1. #1

    Kishi, et al. (2001): Suicidal ideation among patients during the rehabilitation period after life-threatening physical illness

    • Kishi Y, Robinson RG and Kosier JT (2001). Suicidal ideation among patients during the rehabilitation period after life-threatening physical illness. J Nerv Ment Dis. 189 (9): 623-8. Summary: A total of 496 patients were examined for suicidal ideation during the acute hospital period and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months' follow-up after suffering either stroke, traumatic brain injury, myocardial infarction, or spinal cord injury. A total of 7.3% of patients had suicidal ideation during the in-hospital evaluation (acute-onset suicidal ideation), and 11.3% developed it during the chronic 3 to 24 month rehabilitation period (delayed-onset suicidal ideation). Compared with delayed-onset suicidal patients, acute-onset suicidal patients had more predisposing risk factors (i.e., personal psychiatric history and alcohol abuse/dependence) and less social support (i.e., lower frequency of being married). Both acute and delayed-onset suicidal ideation, however, were strongly associated with the existence of major depression and impaired social functioning. These findings suggest that the detection and appropriate treatment of depressive disorders and social isolation may be the most important factor in preventing suicide both during the acute and chronic period following life-threatening physical illnesses. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?db=m&form=6&dopt=r&uid=11580007> Department of Psychiatry, Nippon Medical School, Chiba Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, Japan.

  2. #2

    US Studies

    Dr. Young,
    Different cultures have varying views about depression and suicide. Has a US study been done on SCI patients? I know that Craig did a study on caregiver depression, but what about the individual with the injury? I think depression is overlooked by the medical community and doctors are not properly trained to look for signs and symptoms. The patient says, well what do you expect, my life was just TOTALLY messed up. Unfortunately, depressed patients have been found to have a longer rehab, poorer recovery, higher unemployment and increased pain. Given all this, why does the medical community not address it more aggressively?

  3. #3
    Cheesecake, let me try to put an article together on this subject. There are a large number of U.S. studies on the subject of suicide after spinal cord injury. The problem is that the situation is relatively complicated and also has changed over time. Veterans, for example, have a much higher rate of suicide after spinal cord injury than the general population but the studies have also shown a big difference between veterans of the Vietnam and other wars. Wise.

  4. #4

    Research on SCI & Depression

    Dr. Young, Is there any definitve US research about SCI and clinical depression? Suicide seems to be the far end of the spectrum, I am wondering about depression that requires medical intervention, ie. medication and or therapy. My masters project was on the counseling needs of individuals with self identified disabilities. Clinical depression and to a lesser extent suicidal ideation were reported as significant concerns. The poll here on Carecure whould seem to counter my findings. Although the poll has been viewed by a large number of individuals, few have responded. The caregivers on the other hand show significant depression. Hard to imagine that their family member with SCI was not feeling the same. I am particularly interested in depression associated with SCI pain.

  5. #5
    Originally posted by cheesecake:

    I am particularly interested in depression associated with SCI pain.
    This is my particular interest as well, perhaps for obvious reasons. From posts on this forum and from emails I've received from my
    PainOnline Web site I've heard from several people who have said something along the line of, "I can come to terms with this paralysis, but I don't think I can face another day of this pain."

    David Berg

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