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Thread: Resale value of accessibility modifications

  1. #11
    Yeah, once we crossed the Rubicon by removing kick plates and lowering kitchen counters, cabinets, placing wall oven at knee height level, roll under sink and cooktop the house becomes less desirable to AB's as they want then to do big remodel after the big layout to buy the house. I have always thought that our best bet would be to try 1st to market our house to gimps exclusively in which case our mods are worth additional $, then try selling to AB's if the 1st attempt does not turn up many interested parties.

  2. #12
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    I need them - I have more people looking than listings

    Hi everyone. I joined to jump in on this thread so please excuse me if it's rude to just pop in without introducing myself.

    Most ab's looking are obviously not looking for access features and they see them as something to get rid of, but there are thousands of pwds who ARE looking for homes that are as roll in ready as possible.

    Rentals as well.

    The mods are GOLD.

    While the abs are looking to remove, everything a pwd doesn't have to add is a savings and a bonus from that standpoint.

    If anyone does have a place available for sale or rent with access mods, please contact me before you take them out. I have over 5000 people a month looking - from everywhere.
    spam

  3. #13
    Accessibility modifications or adaptations are only gold if they're what a buyer needs. That's the crux of the issue here. You can have a completely accessible property for one person, but those same features may not work well at all for how another individual uses things or performs everyday activities.

    Look no further than the person-environment-occupation model of occupational therapy. This isn't the greatest illustration, quickly grabbed from Google Images, but should get the point across.



    The smaller that center space is, the less functional a design (a home, in this context) will be for someone; the larger that center space is, the better the fit will be between the person, their environment, and their occupations (tasks/activities). In other words, if a design of an environment doesn't meet the person's functional needs, as well as work well for how they'll actually use the space, it won't be a good fit. This gets pretty complex with certain health conditions (even levels of SCI).

    This is why universal design – not disability-specific accessible design – is becoming a more important focus. If features exist that are generally functional for everyone (e.g., step-less entrances, wide doorways, etc), then the design will work for most people. However, some modifications/adaptations, such as ceiling-mounted track lifts, stair lifts, extensive grab bar setups around toilets, etc, are specific to a much, much smaller demographic. Those features, in regard to resale value, are not gold.

    And that's why I suggested that John consider "un-adapting" his home to make it more universal instead of accessible. What that means, specifically, can't be determined from this discussion as-is.

  4. #14
    another visual, without the specific PEO labels:


  5. #15
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    I agree there is no one size fits all, or even most or many. UD is a great advancement, unfortunately most of the places I've come across are older than the concept so a ramp and door widths and turnaround space are going to vary.

    AIP was unheard of as well so no pre-planning for that either.

    My point was to not immediately remove the features when there just may be someone there who wants them based on real estate people not knowing where to find buyers with those needs.

    A ramp into the house is always gold in my world. I've been on wheels for 47 years and when I see one into a house I'm thrilled. When it's anywhere near to code, I'm even happier.

    I've owned and renovated more than one home as well so I have a little bit first hand experience.

    Nice to meet you
    spam

  6. #16
    Senior Member Lone Beagle's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input. The bottom line is we sold the first house a few years ago and are attempting to convince the insurance company that they need to modify another house. Since it is a to be built house things like doors are not an issue. All I am looking for is the kitchen cabinets, shower and a few grab bars. Really looks like it is going to work.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by KimberleyB View Post
    My point was to not immediately remove the features when there just may be someone there who wants them based on real estate people not knowing where to find buyers with those needs.
    I get your point, but if it were me, I wouldn't wait around "just in case." Some sellers need money more than they need to find a specific buyer. If you truly have 5000 potential buyers on your site, use the opportunity to collect data of what they're looking for, and match them to properties. Heck, if you could match 50 people per month to an ideal home for, say, $199 a pop, you'd have a gold mine of a business. Think of it like the eharmony of real estate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Beagle View Post
    Thanks for all the input. The bottom line is we sold the first house a few years ago and are attempting to convince the insurance company that they need to modify another house. Since it is a to be built house things like doors are not an issue. All I am looking for is the kitchen cabinets, shower and a few grab bars. Really looks like it is going to work.
    Right on. Look into the $5k tax credit! It wouldn't surprise me if some builders sneak that past clients and take it for themselves.

  8. #18
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Beagle View Post
    Thanks for all the input. The bottom line is we sold the first house a few years ago and are attempting to convince the insurance company that they need to modify another house. Since it is a to be built house things like doors are not an issue. All I am looking for is the kitchen cabinets, shower and a few grab bars. Really looks like it is going to work.
    So you already got money to modify a house and NOW you think they should pay to modify another house because for some reason you want to move? If I was the insurance I would tell you to go screw yourself, crap like this is what it so hard to get anything in the FIRST place. If you can afford to build a new house you can afford "accessible features". If it hasn't even been built, how can you claim "it needs to be modified"?

  9. #19
    Accessibility done well ADDS to a home's value instead of detracting. For example, my slate floors (great indoor wheeling surface) and wall-hung basin sinks were installed solely to improve MY functionality in my home. However, both are considered premium upgrades and have added to the overall value of my home.

    I widened exterior entrances (by removing the glass sliders and installing 70/30 French doors in the exact same hole) to provide access and now the French doors are a feature instead of a flaw. You can see my listing here if you're interested.

    Each accessibility feature I added (with the exception of concrete ramps poured outside) cost me no more than than redecorating with standard fixtures.
    Last edited by JenJen; 06-23-2013 at 06:48 PM.
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  10. #20
    Senior Member Lone Beagle's Avatar
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    So you already got money to modify a house and NOW you think they should pay to modify another house because for some reason you want to move?

    Do you contend that as disabled citizens we are bound to one home for the rest of our life?

    If I was the insurance I would tell you to go screw yourself, crap like this is what it so hard to get anything in the FIRST place.

    Please provide supporting evidence

    If you can afford to build a new house you can afford "accessible features". If it hasn't even been built, how can you claim "it needs to be modified"?

    The house requires accessible features such as an accessible shower, kitchen cabinets and appliances which are expensive modifications.

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