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Thread: when to discuss work accommodations?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by darkeyed_daisy View Post
    You mobility requirements don't prevent you from doing the job right? It shouldn't matter but it may be awkward if like Scorpion says "you show up and your office is on a second floor with no elevator".
    This is my first new job since my injury 8 years ago, so I've never gone through this process before. It is further complicated since this is a pretty big move for me -- I will be relocating across the country (NC to CA) and so I want to take appropriate steps now to make sure I can succeed in the new job. I'm just not sure how to broach the subject with my new boss. I don't want they to rescind the offer, but more importantly, I don't want to show up (after having quit my job, sold my house and all my stuff) and get fired either.
    Daniel

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc View Post
    This is my first new job since my injury 8 years ago, so I've never gone through this process before. It is further complicated since this is a pretty big move for me -- I will be relocating across the country (NC to CA) and so I want to take appropriate steps now to make sure I can succeed in the new job. I'm just not sure how to broach the subject with my new boss. I don't want they to rescind the offer, but more importantly, I don't want to show up (after having quit my job, sold my house and all my stuff) and get fired either.
    Well, that raises the stakes. I think you have to tell them as soon as possible and let the chips fall as they may. Telling them sooner will give them time to rearrange the furniture so to speak in anticipation of your arrival. After all they picked you, they must want you. On the other hand waiting could piss them off by not giving them enough time and the downsides are not so good even if you keep the job.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  3. #13
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scorpion View Post
    Also, I agree that it might a shock and offense to them that you show up for work and "Surprise! I'm in a wheelchair!" It's a good strategy to not bring it up before you're hired (that's what I did years ago for a job), but letting them know right away after you're hired will be beneficial for everyone, especially if there are any changes at their offices necessary.
    This.
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  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc View Post
    This is my first new job since my injury 8 years ago, so I've never gone through this process before. It is further complicated since this is a pretty big move for me -- I will be relocating across the country (NC to CA) and so I want to take appropriate steps now to make sure I can succeed in the new job. I'm just not sure how to broach the subject with my new boss. I don't want they to rescind the offer, but more importantly, I don't want to show up (after having quit my job, sold my house and all my stuff) and get fired either.
    You were offered a job across country, site unseen, and are leaving your previous infrastructure/life behind and thought about not telling them about your disability beforehand?

    You really need to get your future employer onboard and supporting you. You're making several major life changes all at once (relocating, new job, new docs, new people, ...) and with a disability.

    What kind of injury do you have?

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    You were offered a job across country, site unseen, and are leaving your previous infrastructure/life behind and thought about not telling them about your disability beforehand?
    That's not quite accurate; I've never considered "not telling them." I am asking for advice on how/when to bring it up and what talking points to cover.
    Daniel

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by -scott- View Post
    I overlooked the part about you already having the job. If that's the case, then yeah, give them a call and chat about it. 10:1 says it won't be a big deal.
    Thanks, scott, I'll probably do that.
    Daniel

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc View Post
    That's not quite accurate; I've never considered "not telling them." I am asking for advice on how/when to bring it up and what talking points to cover.
    Well, realistically what do you need in the way of accommodations? Is this a job where you sit at a desk all day and just need to be sure you have access to your desk, do you walk or are you in a wheelchair 24/7? Can you type or do you need speech recognition equipment? If all you need to to make sure you can get to your desk I would be pretty casual about it, there isn't much they need to do.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc View Post
    That's not quite accurate; I've never considered "not telling them." I am asking for advice on how/when to bring it up and what talking points to cover.
    Sorry, I just want you to put your best caster forward (assuming you're in a chair).

    The best thing to do is just call and tell your new boss tomorrow. I wouldn't beat around the bush, I'd just tell him/her.

  9. #19
    Dan,
    I would not tell them until you can discuss it face to face. Because they won't know the real extent of what you might or might not need. And you don't want to scare them. Plus if they do fire you over your disability you'll have a better case against them.

    Second, I know this wasn't your question but I am curious if you looked in to the factors of cost of living there? It's probably going to cost you double what it cost you in NC. The reason I am asking is I talk to a lot of people that move here to South Florida from NC. And some of them regret it because they didn't realize the cost to living here. They thought they were getting a raise and found out later it wasn't enough. And we don't have a state tax like California's 13%.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRainman View Post
    I would not tell them until you can discuss it face to face. Because they won't know the real extent of what you might or might not need. And you don't want to scare them.
    That's generally my thought process, but if he's already hired & in queue to start working with the company, it's past that point.

    I'll never fully understand why companies think it's a good idea to hire someone without a face-to-face meeting.

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