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Thread: The future of wheelchair technology is here!!!

  1. #1

    The future of wheelchair technology is here!!!


  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorlover View Post
    I have no words.

  3. #3
    Well that chair would put us in our place.

    Now I completely understand why many of the Indian IT workers I work with won't acknowledge me as a human being even though I am considerably higher in rank than them.

  4. #4
    Why don't these geniuses shift their efforts toward a cure instead of a crap while you roll wheelchair?
    Last edited by Patton57; 05-26-2013 at 01:14 PM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorlover View Post
    The seven-member team of final year mechanical engineering students at the Saintgits College of Engineering that has designed the product as part of their project work claims it has far greater advantages than the regular wheelchairs.

    Is this a joke?? you need a engineering team for do a hole in a seat and put wheels on it, well, actually has the advantage that you can shit while you ride through the park , Wow, where i could buy one?

  6. #6
    I'd like to see an Icon-style suspension, some knobby tires, and maybe add D's Locks. It would be great if it's compatible with the FreeWheel...then they'd have the world's first all-terrain porta-potty.

  7. #7
    Senior Member NikkiMaya's Avatar
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    I don't think this discussion is funny. These young men worked incredibly hard to solve a serious problem where they live and instead of giving them accolades, you find it to be big joke? We are all in this together. Why can't you be happy for the people that will benefit from this? Seriously?

    If you haven't seen the situation for people with disabilities in developing countries, maybe you wouldn't understand why this would be a major innovation.

    I did my study abroad in Tanzania, worked in Ghana, and traveled all through East and Central Africa up to Ethiopia. Most people with disabilities are begging, crawling in the streets or are hidden away in back rooms. People who are lucky enough to have a wheelchair, typically use a tricycle, which is pedaled with the hands. These bikes are very large, are subject to breakdowns, are expensive, and difficult to repair. These bikes do not allow for the seat to be reclined, and they don't take toileting into account as you cannot fit them through the doorway of an outhouse.

    You might joke about the design function of this team's wheelchair but you might not realize that toileting in many countries involves squatting over a hole or trough in the ground. This is difficult even for able bodied people. Many people use "flying toilets" where they simply go in a bag and throw it on a trash heap. Why would you begrudge an aid that makes it easier for people with disabilities to use the toilet. If you lived in india, wouldn't you want this for yourself?

    I can understand how this wheelchair represents a major innovation in India. We might laugh at this technology here, forgetting that we have access to so much. Maybe it is time to stop laughing and remember that we are actually quite lucky in many ways.

    Sorry to go on a rant, but this conversation was incredibly unsavory.
    In our world constituted of differences of all kinds, it is not the disabled, but society at large that needs special education...to become a genuine society for all. -Frederic Major, Former UNESCO Director General

  8. #8
    This topic isn't the least bit funny. If the professor guiding these students would have done a quick internet search they would have easily determined the whole spectrum of chair options already available (including the third world refurb/charity market) throughout the world.

    I understand there is an immediate need to literally get the third world disabled up and off the streets but I'd rather see these patchwork R&D efforts aim higher.

    The thing that spoke to me in this article is how the disabled are viewed in less evolved cultures not the modernity/functionality of this particular wheelchair design.

    Maybe from their perspective though they have come up with the optimal solution to the balance of issues for many of the disabled in their culture. I still think they need to aim higher!

  9. #9
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    I think that these guys (and remember that they are just college students) just tried to add one too many functions to their design. The design of the drive mechanism sounds like a good idea and I like the fact that they thought about the user being able to make the adjustments themselves.
    Don - Grad Student Emeritus
    T3 ASIA A 26 years post injury

  10. #10
    Yeah, sorry in the real world getting a "A" for effort doesn't count. You want to see someone who actually researched what people in 3rd world countries need and came up with something practical google "cardboard wheelchair".


    Quote Originally Posted by NikkiMaya View Post
    I don't think this discussion is funny. These young men worked incredibly hard to solve a serious problem where they live and instead of giving them accolades, you find it to be big joke? We are all in this together. Why can't you be happy for the people that will benefit from this? Seriously?

    If you haven't seen the situation for people with disabilities in developing countries, maybe you wouldn't understand why this would be a major innovation.

    I did my study abroad in Tanzania, worked in Ghana, and traveled all through East and Central Africa up to Ethiopia. Most people with disabilities are begging, crawling in the streets or are hidden away in back rooms. People who are lucky enough to have a wheelchair, typically use a tricycle, which is pedaled with the hands. These bikes are very large, are subject to breakdowns, are expensive, and difficult to repair. These bikes do not allow for the seat to be reclined, and they don't take toileting into account as you cannot fit them through the doorway of an outhouse.

    You might joke about the design function of this team's wheelchair but you might not realize that toileting in many countries involves squatting over a hole or trough in the ground. This is difficult even for able bodied people. Many people use "flying toilets" where they simply go in a bag and throw it on a trash heap. Why would you begrudge an aid that makes it easier for people with disabilities to use the toilet. If you lived in india, wouldn't you want this for yourself?

    I can understand how this wheelchair represents a major innovation in India. We might laugh at this technology here, forgetting that we have access to so much. Maybe it is time to stop laughing and remember that we are actually quite lucky in many ways.

    Sorry to go on a rant, but this conversation was incredibly unsavory.

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