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Thread: My latest blog - Ironbutt

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorpion View Post
    I do see the root cause, and I'm not sure how you read my post and surmised that I don't. That's part of the education and enlightenment I was saying Hollywood needs; wanting name recognition isn't justification for not hiring an actor who's disabled (though the bean counters would say it is), it's just one of a myriad of reasons, some justifiable, some not.

    Another part of the education and enlightenment is making Hollywood realize that a disabled character can be more than just an inspiration or a villain, and a disabled character can just be a character, with little or no acknowledgement of his or her disability.
    Fair enough! My apologies, I wasn't sure if you did or not. And I agree, it would be nice to have a character that is ''just'' a character.

    Quote Originally Posted by NikkiMaya View Post
    Problematically, all of the above characters are white as are the characters listed in the GLAAD survey. Race and ethnicity is another big area of underrepresentation and discrimination in casting.
    Evidently the industry hasn't quite caught on to the whole concept of intersectionality.

  2. #22
    Shit. I have a major girl crush lol

    Quote Originally Posted by NikkiMaya View Post
    Twistties brought up an important point. There aren't any blockbuster Hollywood stars that made their name post-injury or illness, and I think it is unacceptable to argue that PWD should be passed over continually because they have no name recognition. This is self-perpatuating cycle that can feed on discrimination.

    In the end this is a serious problem and it is not just about who is portraying the character. We simply need PWD to be shown accurately on TV and in the movies, period. We are practically invisible! When we are not given representation commensurate to our numbers, it feeds into the idea that we do not exist and do not deserve rights or attention. Increased visibility can lead to change across the board in so many ways, but change starts in casting when people let down the barriers and decide that actors with disabilities can do the job.
    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

  3. #23
    Senior Member IsMaisin's Avatar
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    There was a show in '89 called Life Goes On. The lead actor was a young man with Down's Syndrome (Chris Burke) playing a character named Corky. The show was, for its time, quite groundbreaking in its portrayal of disabilities such as Down's and life with HIV. Chris himself is quite the writer, and has been a professional editor.

    I was reminded of the attitude of some of the people that time when, a few weeks ago, I read a letter in which Andrew Schroeder, a patent lawyer, expressed his displeasure at the US Patent and Trademark Office and used the term "Corky" as a slur while insulting the intelligence of the USPTO official who declined a patent he applied for. I do remember hearing that slur used by some juvenile idiots (Mr. Schroeder was only 16 at the time the show aired) 20-some-odd years ago, but I had thought we as a society had moved on and grown up (at least a little).

    Twenty years ago, Rodney King was testifying in court about his experience with the police. Last year, shortly before his death, he made this statement to the L.A. Times:
    "I sometimes feel like I'm caught in a vise," he said. "Some people feel like I'm some kind of hero. Others hate me. They say I deserved it. Other people, I can hear them mocking me for when I called for an end to the destruction, like I'm a fool for believing in peace."

    "It changed things. It made the world a better place."
    Twenty years before that, Mark Essex, after two years of "relentless" racial abuse in the Navy, killed nine people in a revenge spree killing. "His black friends tried to explain to him that racism in the military was just a bitter pill that he had to learn to swallow".

    And twenty years before that, Christine Jorgensen "went abroad, and came back a broad". She was later denied a marriage license because, as a transexual, her original birth certificate listed her as male.

    So I guess attitudes do change, are changing. I do know from personal experience that those of us with PTSD are no longer treated the way Patton treated his soldiers.

    Personally, I don't mind AB actors portraying any character, AB or not. I am not offended by cross-cultural or cross-racial or cross-sexual casting. I think of the director as an artist interpreting a piece of art. If it is done respectfully, and not in the attitude of former times that insisted that only the "right" sort of people could act or would be acceptable actors to general audiences, then it is fine by me.
    Played with bombs- No SCI, Brain Damage enough that I require a chair and a caregiver.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    The Curious Case of Gayface - Should straight actors play gay roles?

    Interesting discussion, similar to the one we've had here but with regards to the LGBT community...

    It’s true that such a race-based list would at least raise eyebrows, if not inspire outright anger, due to the ever-present specter of blackface. But does this provocative comparison really hold up? Does “gayface” really deserve to be placed in the same awful category as racial impersonation, and if not, what makes it different?
    . . . in terms of acting, we’re really talking about a set of behavioral traits, interests, or “mannerisms”—the stuff that’s meant to set off a well-tuned gaydar. But that’s not a great definition either, because there are plenty of gay people who pass for straight, could pass for straight if they wanted to, and/or reject the so-called stereotype. And then there’s the somewhat controversial argument (which I espouse) that “gay” is really a specific cultural attitude that one must study and ultimately choose to wear atop one’s innate homosexuality. So that’s three definitions of gay, and there are plenty of others—I do not envy the straight actor who is asked to sort them out for himself.
    [Full Article]

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorpion View Post
    Interesting discussion, similar to the one we've had here but with regards to the LGBT community...





    [Full Article]
    A gay Actor has the choice to play a straight role. A disabled actor does not have that "range".

    Actors in chairs need to be advocated for giving them the roles in chairs if they meet all the other casting criteria.

    Larry Sapp has been addressing this for years.. seems he isnt getting much help or support here with only 90 likes. https://www.facebook.com/DontShootIronside?fref=ts
    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

  6. #26
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sherocksandsherolls View Post
    A gay Actor has the choice to play a straight role. A disabled actor does not have that "range".
    True, but it's still similar in the sense that some people in the LGBT community think that only someone who's LGBT should play an LGBT role, as some in the disabled community think only someone who's disabled should play a disabled role.

    Larry Sapp may only have 90 "likes" on his Facebook page because demanding that disabled roles only be filled by disabled actors isn't a realistic or effective plan of action, in my opinion.

    I want to see actors w/disabilities in lots more roles, not just roles written specifically as a disabled person either.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Scorpion's Avatar
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    Nobody's really answering my questions from earlier, so I'll re-post them in a bulleted list for easier reading.

    I'm just wondering, if we're going to demand that disabled actors be cast for characters with disabilities, where is the line drawn?

    • Can a para play a quad?
    • Can a high quad play a guy with ALS?
    • Can a quad or a para play a guy who was born with CP?
    • Can a person born with Spina Bifida play a character who was paralyzed in a car accident?
    • Can a person with MS play a quad who was paralyzed by gunshot?
    • Can someone paralyzed by Transverse Myelitis play someone who got an SCI by diving?
    • Should 'The Walking Dead' have re-cast Hershel with a real-life amputee after the character's leg was hacked off to save his life?
    • Should Joe on "Family Guy" be voiced by an actual paraplegic?
    • Should "House" have had a guy with a real limp from the same medical issue (I forget the name of the issue that caused his limp and pain) as the character portray Gregory House, MD?
    • Should Professor X be portrayed by a real para in the X-Men movies, even though he's been both able-bodied and disabled at various points in the film franchise (and comics)?

  8. #28
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    that's a bit of good questions.

  9. #29
    Has anybody ever seen Oz on HBO? Always liked this guy on lost. Wondering how his acting was on Oz.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw View Post
    Has anybody ever seen Oz on HBO? Always liked this guy on lost. Wondering how his acting was on Oz.
    Geez, I don't really remember him that well on Lost. I will never forget his acting on Oz.
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
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