Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 42

Thread: Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor Function in Human SCI

  1. #1
    Senior Member mcferguson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    153

    Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor Function in Human SCI

    http://cdmrp.army.mil/scirp/highlights.shtml#2_13

    Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor Function in Human SCI
    Posted April 4, 2013
    Gordon Mitchell, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison;
    Gillian Muir, D.V.M., Ph.D., University of Saskatchewan;
    Randy Trumbower, Ph.D., Emory University

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts the connections between the brain and spinal cord, leading to lifelong paralysis in soldiers. However, many spinal cord injuries are incomplete, leaving at least some spared neural pathways to the motor neurons that initiate and coordinate movement. Consequently, spinal plasticity can contribute to spontaneous recovery of limb and respiratory function following SCI. Unfortunately, spontaneous recovery is slow, variable, and of limited extent. Dr. Gordon Mitchell, Dr. Gillian Muir, and Dr. Randy Trumbower received a Translational Research Partnership Award from the Fiscal Year 2010 Spinal Cord Injury Research Program to study the potential value of repeated acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH), alone or in combination with locomotor training, for improving limb function in animals with chronic SCI. They are applying AIH to elicit cellular and synaptic mechanisms of spinal plasticity in non-respiratory motor neurons, and hope to determine whether it can improve leg function in patients with chronic, incomplete SCI. Preliminary animal experiments have shown that AIH combined with daily training elicits sustained improvement in limb motor function of treated animals with chronic cervical SCI. In addition, preliminary clinical studies reveal a sustained increase in walking speed and distance following a 10-meter walk test and a 6-minute walk test, respectively. If successful, AIH could represent a novel method for stimulating spinal plasticity in individuals with SCI, providing an avenue for controlled restoration of motor neuron excitability, and eventual restoration of volitional movement after incomplete SCI.
    Links:
    Public and Technical Abstracts: Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor Function in Human SCI
    T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
    Future SCI Alumnus.
    I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

  2. #2
    This needs a big update! SCI patients at Emory Univ in NY are indeed reaping physical benefits from intermittent hypoxic training and I include a link with video of this. I heard back from Aussie company who recently sold a specially made IHT equipment to US. I'm wondering if they sent it to Valeria Cavalli at Washington University. Kate here wrote about Cavalli at her blog curescience.wordpress.com. I'm waiting to hear back from Cavalli.

    http://www.hypoxico.com/about-altitude/

  3. #3
    I believe the Emory University you're referring to is in Georgia rather than New York (Atlanta to be exact). There is a clinical trial currently underway at Emory utilizing hypoxia for SCI. Here is the LINK about that human clinical study.

    Valeria's lab work is in a petri dish rather than human studies and is working between peripheral nerve and central system to identify genes involved in hypoxia responses. Here's her most recent paper abstract. She has an axon regeneration lab that is at Washington University in St. Louis.

    "The primary goal of the Cavalli lab is to unravel the molecular events that dictate the regenerative response of neurons in the peripheral nervous system and to relate this information to the lack of regenerative capacity in the central nervous system. Our proposed research has a broad clinical impact, since axonal damage can occur in traumatic SCI, stroke and many other neurodegenerative diseases".

    This is her publication listing.

    This is the study taking place at Emory University in the video...




    Open Access: Daily intermittent hypoxia enhances walking after chronic spinal cord injury A randomized trial
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 01-11-2016 at 10:25 PM.

  4. #4
    Thanks, Grammy! Yes, it's the Emory School of Medicine doing the trial and it's very likely a therapy that'll help me move better. I wonder if other rehab places can do the trial. It doesn't make sense it's taken so many years to get to "experimental" study. -Jan

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by FellowHawkeye View Post
    Thanks, Grammy! Yes, it's the Emory School of Medicine doing the trial and it's very likely a therapy that'll help me move better. I wonder if other rehab places can do the trial. It doesn't make sense it's taken so many years to get to "experimental" study. -Jan
    They are also in the middle of an intermitten hypoxia trial where they are adding caffeine to the test subjects which are chronic incompletes. LINK
    There's also IH trials going on over in Chile. I did visit with two researchers just last month that had actually tried this IH themselves. They said it was not an easy session to get through at all. It doesn't look too bad, but they described it as quite uncomfortable.

  6. #6
    Could This be evidence that hyperbaric oxygen therapy could actually help? Specially if combined with gait training

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    Could This be evidence that hyperbaric oxygen therapy could actually help? Specially if combined with gait training
    I don't think so. The intermitten hypoxia treatment is entirely different than the hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hypoxia is taking away the oxygen whereas the hyperbaric is adding it.. The way hypoxia was described, I wouldn't even take a chance on standing and doing some kind of gait training in conjunction.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Do any of you understand the mechanism underlying the benefit of intermittent hypoxia? I always thought that hypoxia was damaging to the nervous system. For example, sleep apnea results in chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep which is not good for the nervous system.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mocha-rain View Post
    Do any of you understand the mechanism underlying the benefit of intermittent hypoxia? I always thought that hypoxia was damaging to the nervous system. For example, sleep apnea results in chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep which is not good for the nervous system.
    It's the prolonged hypoxia that is damaging. The work being done in both animal and human trial are short bursts (intermittent). I'll be posting a video tonight on the SCI research blog with Dr. Jerry Silver where he goes into a lot of detail about this. Listen closely around 45:00 in the presentation to hear more about IH in both animal and human research results.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-05-2012, 12:18 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-21-2010, 07:26 AM
  3. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-03-2007, 08:06 PM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-28-2005, 05:42 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-16-2002, 07:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •