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Thread: How old do SCIs get

  1. #31
    [QUOTE=jarodreneekyli;1681194]I am engaged to an awesome Angel, My Fiancee Renee was injured c6,c7 ten yrs ago in an auto accident. She has partial use of upper limbs, We just had a beautiful baby girl born to us last june, other than hip pain from the removal of bone for the fusion, virtually she stays pain free...

    Talkin with her father the other day, and he said that he believes she is already in the bottom end of her life expectancy.

    She was injured at the age of 23, and just turned 34, carried our daughter the complete nine months amazingly, not so much as even morning sickness, Unbelievably Strong determined woman.. Is there any stats for mid twenties sci life expectancy of females?

    Just really scarred me out of my mind when her own father said that with out any emotion on his face... I cant imagine my life without her, shes my hero, my inspiration.. And our 11 month old daughter now???

    Any help or encouraging words, PLEASE


    Good grief. There is no reason to think that she is on the downside and that her life expectancy is any different for what you are seeing here. With good care she should have a good chance to become a grandmother. It sounds like her father has looked at statistics from the 1950s or 60s.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  2. #32
    Two people I was at rehab with at Kessler in NJ back in 95, Stephen Mahoney & Christopher Reeve, passed away from pressure wounds & infection. Health can be fragile.
    Just to be clear, Christopher Reeve died from an allergic reaction---not infection.

    Your point about being careful and avoiding pressure sores/infection is well taken.
    Every day I wake up is a good one

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by cheesecake View Post
    Just to be clear, Christopher Reeve died from an allergic reaction---not infection.
    "Died from an allergic reaction" doesn't adequately describe the full context surrounding Reeve's death.

    Since I was not aware of the particulars I did a search and found this, which seems pretty thorough (but it, too, may have factual errors):

    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...did-96666.html

    article from paralysis.org, also found on at least one reeve family/foundation site:
    "skin care

    the death of christopher reeve last october was attributed to heart failure due to sepsis (also known as septicemia), an infection that spreads from a specific location (such as a skin sore or bladder infection) to the blood and other organs. what exactly happened to christopher reeve isn’t known and may never be; there was no autopsy. clearly, his death was related to pressure sores; at the time of his death reeve had been battling more than one skin sore. he had even experienced life-threatening sepsis just weeks before he died.

    indeed, reeve died as a result of heart failure, which was included in the death certificate. there were complicating factors, however.

    according to dana reeve, speaking on national television, neither a pressure sore nor infection directly precipitated reeve’s coma and subsequent death. despite what was reported at the time, reeve’s body almost certainly did not go into septic shock (a type of blood poisoning that can lead to organ failure and death). the most probable cause of death, dana reeve said, was a reaction to a drug reeve was given to help treat a suspected infection. he had been given the drug on previous occasions, successfully. reeve had a history of drug sensitivity. shortly after getting an injection of the drug, reeve’s body went into shock (anaphylactic) resulting in coma and eventually, the shutting down of his organ systems. he never emerged from the coma and died less than 18 hours later.

    dana reeve was very clear about the quality of care her husband received. she praised the medical staff and noted that their actions in the final hours were appropriate and unequivocal.

    there may be lessons to be learned from the high profile life and death of christopher reeve. by all accounts reeve’s final days were totally normal; he was on the road making a speech, he was busy being a moviemaker, an advocate and a dad, basically doing the things he wanted to do. he never paid heed to the actuarial life-limits placed on his type of paralysis by statisticians (11.4 years).

    certainly, reeve’s medical staff urged him to heed the fundamental protocol for dealing with any level of pressure sore, that is, to get out of the wheelchair and let the wounds heal up. but reeve chose to live his life fully and well and as much as possible on his own terms. he was not, as his wife explained, a man who was easily persuaded to slow down.

    the primary lesson, of course, is to be especially aggressive with wounds. it may not be possible to prevent the occurrence of a pressure sore. with appropriate seating and sleeping equipment and attention to basic care, though, most people who are paralyzed can enjoy health and skin integrity for years to come.

    while it may not have been a factor in reeve’s death, septicemia is a real possibility if a pressure sore gets out of control. this degree of infection is generally controllable, however. "

  4. #34
    @ Stephen212 --Thanks for sharing, great information to know!
    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  5. #35
    t-10 para post 20 years. Per Dr's my life expectancy is 44 years out with my disability. I am definitely feeling the affects of being in a chair 20 years. I need rotator cuff surgery from all the years of wheelchair sports.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by jarodreneekyli View Post
    I am engaged to an awesome Angel, My Fiancee Renee was injured c6,c7 ten yrs ago in an auto accident. She has partial use of upper limbs, We just had a beautiful baby girl born to us last june, other than hip pain from the removal of bone for the fusion, virtually she stays pain free...

    Talkin with her father the other day, and he said that he believes she is already in the bottom end of her life expectancy.

    She was injured at the age of 23, and just turned 34, carried our daughter the complete nine months amazingly, not so much as even morning sickness, Unbelievably Strong determined woman.. Is there any stats for mid twenties sci life expectancy of females?

    Just really scarred me out of my mind when her own father said that with out any emotion on his face... I cant imagine my life without her, shes my hero, my inspiration.. And our 11 month old daughter now???

    Any help or encouraging words, PLEASE



    (KLD)
    [/QUOTE]

    That doesn't seem right especially if she is healthy. I mean we could all die at any moment but his comment seems poorly judged. If by bottom end he means second half then I suppose that makes sense
    T6 complete since 3/21/2012

  7. #37
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    North Carolina, USA
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    3,399
    jarodrenee - her father is an idiot. End of story. Ignore him and live a long happy life!
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by jarodreneekyli View Post
    I am engaged to an awesome Angel, My Fiancee Renee was injured c6,c7 ten yrs ago in an auto accident. She has partial use of upper limbs, We just had a beautiful baby girl born to us last june, other than hip pain from the removal of bone for the fusion, virtually she stays pain free...

    Talkin with her father the other day, and he said that he believes she is already in the bottom end of her life expectancy.

    She was injured at the age of 23, and just turned 34, carried our daughter the complete nine months amazingly, not so much as even morning sickness, Unbelievably Strong determined woman.. Is there any stats for mid twenties sci life expectancy of females?

    Just really scarred me out of my mind when her own father said that with out any emotion on his face... I cant imagine my life without her, shes my hero, my inspiration.. And our 11 month old daughter now???

    Any help or encouraging words, PLEASE



    (KLD)
    [/QUOTE]

    I was injured at age 20 (C5/C6). I will be 70 my next birthday. I had 3 children after my accident and we now have 9 grandchildren. Our oldest grandson has been married over a year, so I could have already been a great-grandmother! When my first child was 8 mos. old some "helpful" person shared that the life expectancy of a quad at that time was 10 years. Like you, it really scared me, but I chose to ignore the dire warnings and just lived each day at a time. Your fiance sounds like a strong, determined person. I wouldn't be surprised at all if she sees grandchildren like I have.

  9. #39
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    BC Canada
    Posts
    2,710
    I'm coming up on 44 years-granted my SCI is congenital. From MY perspective, it seems that quality rehab and medical care + not letting any issues slide are the most important factors in leading a long life with a SCI.

    As much as this site is a help to us I also think it can give a really skewed perspective as to the over all health of people with SCI- the majority of posts are from people with issues, there are thousands of para's and quads out there living healthy relatively "normal" lives that don't post on carecure. As far as stats don't forget the saying "there are lies, damn lies and statistics" This site is just one source of info and opinions.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    "Died from an allergic reaction" doesn't adequately describe the full context surrounding Reeve's death.

    Since I was not aware of the particulars I did a search and found this, which seems pretty thorough (but it, too, may have factual errors):

    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...did-96666.html

    article from paralysis.org, also found on at least one reeve family/foundation site:
    "skin care

    the death of christopher reeve last october was attributed to heart failure due to sepsis (also known as septicemia), an infection that spreads from a specific location (such as a skin sore or bladder infection) to the blood and other organs. what exactly happened to christopher reeve isn’t known and may never be; there was no autopsy. clearly, his death was related to pressure sores; at the time of his death reeve had been battling more than one skin sore. he had even experienced life-threatening sepsis just weeks before he died.

    indeed, reeve died as a result of heart failure, which was included in the death certificate. there were complicating factors, however.

    according to dana reeve, speaking on national television, neither a pressure sore nor infection directly precipitated reeve’s coma and subsequent death. despite what was reported at the time, reeve’s body almost certainly did not go into septic shock (a type of blood poisoning that can lead to organ failure and death). the most probable cause of death, dana reeve said, was a reaction to a drug reeve was given to help treat a suspected infection. he had been given the drug on previous occasions, successfully. reeve had a history of drug sensitivity. shortly after getting an injection of the drug, reeve’s body went into shock (anaphylactic) resulting in coma and eventually, the shutting down of his organ systems. he never emerged from the coma and died less than 18 hours later.

    dana reeve was very clear about the quality of care her husband received. she praised the medical staff and noted that their actions in the final hours were appropriate and unequivocal.

    there may be lessons to be learned from the high profile life and death of christopher reeve. by all accounts reeve’s final days were totally normal; he was on the road making a speech, he was busy being a moviemaker, an advocate and a dad, basically doing the things he wanted to do. he never paid heed to the actuarial life-limits placed on his type of paralysis by statisticians (11.4 years).

    certainly, reeve’s medical staff urged him to heed the fundamental protocol for dealing with any level of pressure sore, that is, to get out of the wheelchair and let the wounds heal up. but reeve chose to live his life fully and well and as much as possible on his own terms. he was not, as his wife explained, a man who was easily persuaded to slow down.

    the primary lesson, of course, is to be especially aggressive with wounds. it may not be possible to prevent the occurrence of a pressure sore. with appropriate seating and sleeping equipment and attention to basic care, though, most people who are paralyzed can enjoy health and skin integrity for years to come.

    while it may not have been a factor in reeve’s death, septicemia is a real possibility if a pressure sore gets out of control. this degree of infection is generally controllable, however. "
    Here is a dissenting view from New Mobility:

    Bully Pulpit: Media Lies
    bully pulpit

    January 2005


    We complain about the Supreme Court gutting the Americans with Disabilities Act, but our worst enemy may be movies, television and news programs that shape public attitudes. Lately quadriplegia has emerged as the darling of dreaded disabilities--the media love to dramatize how "horrific" and "hopeless" a cervical spinal cord injury must be. And celebrated movies such as Million Dollar Baby and The Sea Inside only hint at the pervasiveness of this mindset.

    When Christopher Reeve died, the TV networks dug up outdated stock footage of Reeve as a fledgling quad--any image that would showcase his dependency. The idea was to emphasize how much he had lost, how much care he needed, how difficult his life as a quad was. In the same vein, his early thoughts of suicide were perfectly suited to the sappy stuff of talk shows and intimate interviews a la Barbara Walters and Larry King.

    Reeve's busy work schedule, many accomplishments and full family life were seen as secondary. Writing books, directing movies, giving keynote speeches and spending quality family time are not the stuff of high drama. In the days immediately following his death, the story emerged that he had died of sepsis caused by a common bedsore--further "proof" of how fragile the life of a quad must be.

    Turns out Reeve's reported cause of death was not entirely true. If you read what I wrote in the December issue of NM, you might have surmised that Reeve did not die of a raging blood infection from a bedsore. Two sources disclosed to me that he died of a reaction to an injectable antibiotic. I quoted one of the sources--John McDonald, Reeve's rehab physician--but downplayed the news out of respect for Dana Reeve. Finally, on Feb. 16, Mrs. Reeve admitted on the Oprah show that a sudden reaction to an antibiotic was the most likely cause of her husband's death.

    Prior to writing my December story, I had learned that on the day Reeve lapsed into a coma, he was feeling fine, with only minor signs of infection. Further, an eyewitness had confirmed to one of my sources that Reeve went into a sudden irreversible coma within 30 seconds of receiving the injection.

    This is important news because it dispels the myth that all quads are perpetually camped on death's doorstep. The truth is Reeve had an uncommon medical history. He had been plagued with allergic reactions and unusual conditions from childhood. But the media fixated on his disability. As one TV anchorwoman put it: "In the end, his spinal cord injury was just too severe."

    http://www.newmobility.com/articleVi...&action=browse

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