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Thread: How old do SCIs get

  1. #1

    How old do SCIs get

    So my understanding is roughly 40 years. So a youngin like myself being injuried at age 22 will live to about 62? Obviously complications, care and injury affect it but Maybe some people know some ages people passed away or still alive(and please include the years injuried if possible)? And I only speak from a paraplegic side of view, I understand its different and worse for quads.

    PS: I have a torn upper aorta that they fixed with a graft from my groan. Anyone got numbers on that too I'd be curious
    T6 complete since 3/21/2012

  2. #2
    24 yrs post, injured late teens

    Life insurance companies generally think our life expectancies are reduced by 10-15%.

    At this point, I wouldn't worry about the end but about how you're going to live your life.

    AB or SCI, once you get past 60, the name of the game is your health and it seems like anything can take you out.
    Last edited by Patton57; 04-07-2013 at 04:16 AM.

  3. #3
    A study I read a few years back claimed it depended on the age you had the SCI, the level of injury and if you survived the first five years. For a young person such as yourself it did not make that big a difference. However, for an older situation such as mine I believe Patton57 was correct it was somewhere in the 10-20% range. The study referred to a software app that was developed for this research so I contacted the person who wrote the paper and he gave me access to his system so I could run my situation and If I remember correctly it said I had until around age 67 but I certainly would not put a lot of faith in that number. However, it was interesting.

  4. #4
    We have data from the Model SCI Systems database, but you must keep in mind that this is based on historic information. Those injured many years ago had access to less expert medical care. Also, statistical averages do not necessarily predict longevity...obviously there are those who far exceed these predictions, and those who don't achieve them...often based on those who take good care of themselves, and those who don't. Regardless, here is a link to the information we have currently.

    https://www.nscisc.uab.edu/PublicDoc...eb%20Final.pdf

    There is additionally a whole set of literature about relative risk for different causes of death due to having a SCI, which is much more reliable pointing us to health problems that we should be sure we are taking more aggressive preventive measures for in people with SCI, and in screening for on a regular basis.

    You may also want to read the article that Dr. Young posted here last year:

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=189092


    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 04-07-2013 at 07:47 AM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Having read that (and thank you) ... it says a leading cause of death is septicaemia ... not renal failure.

    I'm sure some die from pressure sore infections that go septic ... but my own experience with people I have known is from sepsis from chronic bladder infections.

    I don't see where the study represents that ... Admittedly I only scanned it quickly.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Having read that (and thank you) ... it says a leading cause of death is septicaemia ... not renal failure.

    I'm sure some die from pressure sore infections that go septic ... but my own experience with people I have known is from sepsis from chronic bladder infections.

    I don't see where the study represents that ... Admittedly I only scanned it quickly.
    From the Model System data above:

    Cause of death:

    In years past, the leading cause of death among persons with SCI was renal failure. Today, however, significant advances in urologic management have resulted in dramatic shifts in the leading causes of death. Persons enrolled in the National SCI Database since its inception in 1973 have now been followed for 35 years after injury. During that time, the causes of death that appear to have the greatest impact on reduced life expectancy for this population are pneumonia and septicemia.


    (KLD)

  7. #7
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Yes I read that ... missing is the distinction of septicaemia from bladder infections ... like how we almost lost Le Type last fall.

    Maybe it's just me - cathing and foleys and suprapubics all existed 3 decades ago BUT the antibiotics are better and we have loads more knowledge too.

    Sore subject for me as I remain disappointed in that arena.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  8. #8
    I'm 40 years post. Though my shoulders are fairly well gone, I still handcycle, sometimes using the Powerpod, workout in the gym with a trainer, stand at least 3 times a week, ride the fes bike 15 miles a week and go to a massuese twice a week. I also have a powerfit shoulder press and Vitaglide I use constanty.

    For my mental wellbeing, I get out of the house or work in my workshop. Point is to have something to do durring the day. I went back to school got a degree, did school demos for Terry Fox and Rick Hansen while they did their runs etc. . I still speak at schools from the elementary thru post graduate levels.

    I was told in the beginning, a para lost 15 years of their lifespan. Today, I hear we have the same as an A/B if we take care of ourselves and have good luck.

    Try not to worry bout the lifespan predictions; it's hard to do and we all do/did it.. If anything, use it to motivate yourself to maximize your potential and have a great life with the years that are left. Dang, I sure hope it's more than 40 cause I just ordered a very custom uke that I want to spend a few years playing before I go lol.

  9. #9
    I am a complete quad injured at age 16 and still ticking at age 75. I have a number of para and quad friends whose injuries date back to the 1960s and are still hanging in there. Averages mean very little. The average longevity reflects highs, lows, and everything in between. If I have made it this far, you and others have a chance to reach or even exceed it.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  10. #10
    I am a C5-C6 quad injured in 1967. My health appears to be good, no uti's now for over 30 months. Like Patrick, I try to stay busy. I volunteer with the National Park Service 3 days a week and work on computers 4 days a week. Just take care of yourself and don't worry about things you have no control over. (By the way, my blood pressure in 93/53...not worrying.) I did find out I now have diabetes but I have that under control, at least for now, according to my doctor.

    Good luck.
    Millard
    ''Life's tough... it's even tougher if you're stupid!'' -- John Wayne


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