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Thread: Groundbreaking treatment that enabled paralysed animals to walk again will be tested

  1. #1

    Groundbreaking treatment that enabled paralysed animals to walk again will be tested

    I am posting it here too this article, because it sounds great eventhough it's for incomplete.







    Groundbreaking treatment that enabled paralysed animals to walk again will be tested on HUMANS within months

    Using a cocktail of drugs and electrical impulses, researchers can ‘regrow’ nerves linking the spinal cord to the brain
    After two weeks, the animals were able to walk, climb stairs and run
    Team say they are preparing five patients for human trials of the technology
    By Nick Mcdermott and Mark Prigg

    PUBLISHED: 06:17 EST, 18 February 2013 | UPDATED: 10:06 EST, 18 February 2013

    Scientists behind groundbreaking research that enabled enabled rats with severed spines to run again after two weeks have outlined their plans for human trials.

    The technology brings fresh hope to sufferers of spinal cord injuries, and the team say they hope the first humans could be implanted with the technology within months.

    Using a cocktail of drugs and electrical impulses, researchers hope to begin testing the project to ‘regrow’ nerves linking the spinal cord to the brain in five patients in a Swiss clinic.


    Scroll down for video:

    more...

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...rchers-reveal-

  2. #2
    It was interesting to see that Professor Courtine repeated the experiment on animals whose spines were contused rather than cut, as there had been reservations about the relevance of the first results due to the fact that most human spinal cord injuries are contusion type.

    I hope we'll soon be hearing good news about the five patients in his small human trial.

  3. #3
    In the report I quote. ‘

    regrow’ nerves linking the spinal cord to the brain.

    isn't that part of our spinal cord perfectly fine? Shouldn't it say regrow nerves from the injury site down the spinal cord wtf?




  4. #4
    sorry but those pictures have me cracking up! Go Stewart little GO!
    Ive lost all concentration.
    Im assuming these are acute injuries?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrington314mx View Post
    sorry but those pictures have me cracking up! Go Stewart little GO!
    Ive lost all concentration.
    Im assuming these are acute injuries?

    haha I kept thinking of Master Splinter and wondering where the Ninja Turtles were

  6. #6
    What these "researchers" don't tell you is that most of them try chewing there legs off, because of the pain !!!!
    C-6,complete

  7. #7

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Barrington314mx View Post
    sorry but those pictures have me cracking up! Go Stewart little GO!
    Ive lost all concentration.
    Im assuming these are acute injuries?


    up to 2 years, so they are chronic.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by quad247 View Post
    What these "researchers" don't tell you is that most of them try chewing there legs off, because of the pain !!!!
    and where did you come up with this?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Moe's Avatar
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    Great news, thanks for posting!
    "Talk without the support of action means nothing..."
    ― DaShanne Stokes

    ***Unite(D) to Fight Paralyses***

  10. #10
    and from the comments section of that article...

    God created us equal, so why should we rejoice in any animal being deliberately harmed for the benefit of others.

    - kaz , Bristol, 19/2/2013 01:08

    I think it's sad that this breakthrough came too late for Christopher Reeve.

    - flatdog , Stockton-on-Tees, 19/2/2013 17:16

    You missed off step 0 - deliberately sever spinal cord of an innocent animal.

    - Mute Requiem , England, United Kingdom, 19/2/2013 11:05

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