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Thread: neurotrophins

  1. #1

    neurotrophins

    Professor what is your opinion on these neurotrophins factor: fgf,pdgf,ngf and nt3 and nt6.

    Best regards
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  2. #2
    your opinion please professor
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by fti View Post
    Professor what is your opinion on these neurotrophins factor: fgf,pdgf,ngf and nt3 and nt6.

    Best regards


    your opinion on this facteur neurotrophiques
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  4. #4
    svp une reponse professor
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  5. #5
    We know that lithium increases levels of mRNA for NGF, NT3, and GDNF in the spinal cord of rats that have been transplanted with neonatal rat blood mononuclear cells. We think that the source of the cells are the neonatal mononuclear cells but we are not sure.

    Many laboratories have reported that growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NT3, NGF, FGF) stimulate regeneration in the spinal cord. We have found that lithium increases GDNF, NT3, and NGF in the spinal cord of rats after transplantation of neonatal rat mononuclear cells (similar to umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells). The word neurotrophins are usually reserved for NGF, BDNF, NT3, and NT4. Occasionally, GDNF may be called a neurotrophin. FGF is fibroblast growth factor and is usually not called a neurotrophin.

    We don't know whether release of neurotrophins is the reason why lithium stimulate axon growth in the spinal cord. Lithium may act through several mechanisms, including the following.
    1. Lithium inhibits GSK-3 beta, which normally inhibits two major nuclear factors called NFAT and WNT-beta catenin. These two nuclear factors stimulate cells to proliferate (produce more cells) and to grow.
    2. Lithium stimulate AKT (phosphokinase B), which leads to activation of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). Activation of mTOR stimulates axonal growth. Blocking Pten acts by activation AKT.
    3. Lithium blocks STAT3, an intracellular messenger that stimulate glial cell proliferation.

    We have tried a 6-week course of oral lithium on people with chronic spinal cord injury. At least over a period of 6-12 months, we did not see significant improvements of their motor or sensory scores.

    Wise.

  6. #6
    Thank you very much for your answers Professor
    I wanted to ask if it is possible to inject into the blood or in spinal cord of neurotrophins I wanted to ask you what are the neurotrophins available clinically in for the humans thank you in advance for all these responses
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    We know that lithium increases levels of mRNA for NGF, NT3, and GDNF in the spinal cord of rats that have been transplanted with neonatal rat blood mononuclear cells. We think that the source of the cells are the neonatal mononuclear cells but we are not sure.

    Many laboratories have reported that growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NT3, NGF, FGF) stimulate regeneration in the spinal cord. We have found that lithium increases GDNF, NT3, and NGF in the spinal cord of rats after transplantation of neonatal rat mononuclear cells (similar to umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells). The word neurotrophins are usually reserved for NGF, BDNF, NT3, and NT4. Occasionally, GDNF may be called a neurotrophin. FGF is fibroblast growth factor and is usually not called a neurotrophin.

    We don't know whether release of neurotrophins is the reason why lithium stimulate axon growth in the spinal cord. Lithium may act through several mechanisms, including the following.
    1. Lithium inhibits GSK-3 beta, which normally inhibits two major nuclear factors called NFAT and WNT-beta catenin. These two nuclear factors stimulate cells to proliferate (produce more cells) and to grow.
    2. Lithium stimulate AKT (phosphokinase B), which leads to activation of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). Activation of mTOR stimulates axonal growth. Blocking Pten acts by activation AKT.
    3. Lithium blocks STAT3, an intracellular messenger that stimulate glial cell proliferation.

    We have tried a 6-week course of oral lithium on people with chronic spinal cord injury. At least over a period of 6-12 months, we did not see significant improvements of their motor or sensory scores.

    Wise.
    Professor,

    Have you or anyone else experimented with lithium orotate or lithium aspartate? These forms are available OTC as a dietary supplement. They were developed by pioneers of "orthomolecular medicine" to increase absorption by binding the lithium to an amino acid such as aspartate (NOT the same as aspartame) or orotate. Because this reportedly increases absorption, the dosage can be lowered so that proper blood pH is not disrupted too much and toxicity is more easily avoided. The typical dosage using these forms of lithium is only 5mg yet this can be as effective as a much higher dosage of the citrate or carbonate forms because the amino acid reportedly carries the lithium across the blood brain barrier more effectively. I have tried these with interesting results (some recovery of sensation and function). I believe there may be a problem with purity in most brands available so the next time I try using lithium it will be a brand which is GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) certified. That means the quality is more reliable because the product and manufacturing facilities have been inspected by the FDA. None of the OTC lithium supplements I've tried were GMP certified and I had adverse reactions to all of them. At the same time I did also obtain some benefits.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by fti View Post
    Thank you very much for your answers Professor
    I wanted to ask if it is possible to inject into the blood or in spinal cord of neurotrophins I wanted to ask you what are the neurotrophins available clinically in for the humans thank you in advance for all these responses

    svp professor une reponse
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by fti View Post
    Thank you very much for your answers Professor
    I wanted to ask if it is possible to inject into the blood or in spinal cord of neurotrophins I wanted to ask you what are the neurotrophins available clinically in for the humans thank you in advance for all these responses
    fti,

    Neurotrophins are not approved or currently available as a therapy orally or for injection. Two companies had the intellectual property for the four main neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4): Regeneron and Amgen. Neither of them were able to take the therapies to clinical trials. Amgen invested significantly into production of BDNF, found that BDNF causes loss of appetite in animals and never took the treatment to trial. At one time, Regeneron was interested in using BDNF to treat constipation in people with spinal cord injury but, to my knowledge, this never reached clinical trials.

    Unless one is using neurotrophins to treat the gut, I think that they should be taken orally. Most proteins are broken down in the stomach and is not absorbed into the blood. Most animal studies of neurotrophins administered the drug to the spinal cord intrathecally or directly to the spinal cord by transplanting cells that secreted neurotrophins. This is NOT something that you want to do yourself. It is not clear that neurotrophins cross the blood brain barrier.

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Ryan,

    The standard clinical form of lithium that is given clinically is lithium carbonate. Most of what you say concerning the dosage of lithium orotate is not true.

    1. 5 mg doses of lithium orotate cannot provide enough lithium to achieve therapeutic lithium levels, which is between 0.6 and 1.2 mM blood levels, in humans. The molecular weight of lithium orotate is 162.03 g/mol. One millimole of lithium orotate would be 0.163 g or 163 mg. Five mg of lithium orotrate is only 0.03 millimole. Even if it were absorbed completely or injected intravenously, this cannot yield effective blood levels of lithium.

    2. Lithium carbonate or lithium sulfate (the two major pharmaceutically available forms of lithium) is absorbed as well as or perhaps better than lithium orotate. The typical oral dose (~1 gram a day) does not disrupt blood pH. It is true that if you take only 5 mg of lihium orotrate at a time, there should be little or no lithium toxicity but that is because the dose is far below effective dose levels.

    3. Please do not believe what is being touted in the literature by Dr. John Gray and others. He is selling lithium orotate. I don't know what kind of doctor he is (apparently he is a "relation therapist") but most of what he says about lithium is wrong, in my opinion. By the way, all pharmaceutical lithium is GMP grade and you should not be taking any lithium that is not prescribed by a medical doctor.

    Wise.



    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan B View Post
    Professor,

    Have you or anyone else experimented with lithium orotate or lithium aspartate? These forms are available OTC as a dietary supplement. They were developed by pioneers of "orthomolecular medicine" to increase absorption by binding the lithium to an amino acid such as aspartate (NOT the same as aspartame) or orotate. Because this reportedly increases absorption, the dosage can be lowered so that proper blood pH is not disrupted too much and toxicity is more easily avoided. The typical dosage using these forms of lithium is only 5mg yet this can be as effective as a much higher dosage of the citrate or carbonate forms because the amino acid reportedly carries the lithium across the blood brain barrier more effectively. I have tried these with interesting results (some recovery of sensation and function). I believe there may be a problem with purity in most brands available so the next time I try using lithium it will be a brand which is GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) certified. That means the quality is more reliable because the product and manufacturing facilities have been inspected by the FDA. None of the OTC lithium supplements I've tried were GMP certified and I had adverse reactions to all of them. At the same time I did also obtain some benefits.

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