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Thread: PARALYSIS CURED WITH NO SURGERY

  1. #31
    Originally posted by cementhead:

    Breakthroughs
    In the US , scientists have already successfully used low-powered lasers to repair severed spinal cords in rats and believe the work can be successfully translated to humans.
    A severed or transected spinal cord (complete) is as bad as it gets. If or when they complete the chronic study in rats, will they go straight to humans?

    PN

  2. #32
    i believe that with the use of different therapies combined together, we will be all walking again in the near future............

    Josh S.
    T6 complete as of 7/17/03




  3. #33

  4. #34
    i did it, check out the results section

    i only wanted to have some fun

  5. #35
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Originally posted by cementhead:

    Under the technology transfer system that operates in the US between the military and private companies , Dr Jackson Streeter's firm, PhotoThera, of San Diego, is likely to carry out the very first clinical trials. Dr. Streeter will be concentrating initially on treatment of strokes but is aiming for the beginning of 2005 to start the first ever repair of human spinal cord injuries
    I spoke with Dr Anders yesterday and any clinical trials of this particular laser will take a while longer. It appears the reporter from Scotland was a bit overly optimistic on time frame not on results. Definitely something to keep an eye on though.

    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

  6. #36
    seneca, I agree with you. The claims that lasers have improved walking recovery in animal studies are still very controversial. I am skeptical of much of the work that has been reported, particularly on low powered lasers. Here are some abstracts of studies published over the past half dozen years on the subject.

    Wise.

    References

    Byrnes KR, Waynant RW, Ilev IK, Wu X, Barna L, Smith K, Heckert R, Gerst H and Anders JJ (2005). Light promotes regeneration and functional recovery and alters the immune response after spinal cord injury. Lasers Surg Med 36: 171-85. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been proposed as a potential therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI). We aimed to demonstrate that 810 nm light can penetrate deep into the body and promote neuronal regeneration and functional recovery. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adult rats underwent a T9 dorsal hemisection, followed by treatment with an 810 nm, 150 mW diode laser (dosage = 1,589 J/cm2). Axonal regeneration and functional recovery were assessed using single and double label tract tracing and various locomotor tasks. The immune response within the spinal cord was also assessed. RESULTS: PBM, with 6% power penetration to the spinal cord depth, significantly increased axonal number and distance of regrowth (P < 0.001). PBM also returned aspects of function to baseline levels and significantly suppressed immune cell activation and cytokine/chemokine expression. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that light, delivered transcutaneously, improves recovery after injury and suggests that light will be a useful treatment for human SCI. Department of Anatomy, Physiology & Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA. krb27@georgetown.edu Link Here

    Giuliani A, Fernandez M, Farinelli M, Baratto L, Capra R, Rovetta G, Monteforte P, Giardino L and Calza L (2004). Very low level laser therapy attenuates edema and pain in experimental models. Int J Tissue React 26: 29-37. In this study, we tested a new square wave microprocessor-controlled red laser with an extremely low peak power output (<3 mW; very low level laser therapy [vLLLT]) in experimental pain in the rat. Acute inflammation was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan, chronic inflammation was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant [CFA) and neuropathic pain was produced by sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury [CCI). In our study vLLLT was effective in reducing edema and hyperalgesia in acute and chronic inflammation if administered at the points usually selected for acupuncture. Moreover, spontaneous pain and thermal hyperalgesia were reduced in CCI rats treated with vLLLT In conclusion, vLLLT reduced edema and induced analgesia in experimental plantar pain in rats. We interpret this to mean that enkephalin mRNA level was strongly upregulated in the external layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in CFA and CCI animals, and that vLLLT further increased the mRNA level in single neurons. Department of Veterinary Morphophysiology and Animal Production [DIMORFIPA), University of Bologna, Italy. Link Here


    Taly AB, Sivaraman Nair KP, Murali T and John A (2004). Efficacy of multiwavelength light therapy in the treatment of pressure ulcers in subjects with disorders of the spinal cord: A randomized double-blind controlled trial. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 85: 1657-61. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy of multiwavelength light therapy in the treatment of pressure ulcers in subjects with spinal cord disorders. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Neurologic rehabilitation ward of a referral center in India. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-five subjects with spinal cord injury, with 64 pressure ulcers (stage 2, n=55; stage 3, n=8; stage 4, n=1), were randomized into treatment and control groups. One subject refused consent. Mean duration of ulcers in the treatment group was 34.2+/-45.5 days and in the control group, 57.1+/-43.5 days. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment group received 14 sessions of multiwavelength light therapy, with 46 probes of different wavelengths from a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser source, 3 times a week. Energy used was 4.5 J/cm(2). Ulcers in the control group received sham treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Healing of the ulcer, defined as the complete closure of the wound with healthy scar tissue, time taken for the ulcer to heal, and stage of the ulcer and Pressure Sore Status Tool score 14 days after last treatment. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in healing between the treatment and control groups. Eighteen ulcers in treatment group and 14 in control group healed completely ( P =.802). Mean time taken by the ulcers to heal was 2.45+/-2.06 weeks in the treatment group and 1.78+/-2.13 weeks in the control group ( P =.330). Time taken for stage 3 and 4 ulcers to reach stage 2 was 2.25+/-0.5 weeks in treatment group and 4.33+/-1.53 weeks in control group ( P =.047). CONCLUSIONS: Multiwavelength light therapy from a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser source did not influence overall healing pressure ulcers. Limited evidence suggested that it improved healing of stage 3 and 4 pressure ulcers. National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India. Link Here

    Nicolau RA, Martinez MS, Rigau J and Tomas J (2004). Effect of low power 655 nm diode laser irradiation on the neuromuscular junctions of the mouse diaphragm. Lasers Surg Med 34: 277-84. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) in specific wavelengths and fluence maintains the electrophysiological activity of injured peripheral nerve in rats, preventing scar formation (at injury site) as well as degenerative changes in the corresponding motor neurons of the spinal cord, thus accelerating regeneration of the injured nerve. We studied the effect of LLLT on the neurotransmitter release in neuromuscular junctions of the mouse diaphragm. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-nine diaphragm muscles were studied. LLLT with GaAlAs 655 nm (1-12 J/cm(2)) was used. Neurotransmitter release was studied by conventional intracellular recording techniques on curarised or high magnesium media. Quantal content, amplitude, latency and rise time were analysed for end-plate potentials (EPPs). Frequency and amplitude were evaluated for the miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs). Short-term plasticity of the neurotransmitter release (fast facilitation) was also evaluated by paired pulse stimulation. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that LLLT (655 nm) in these doses has no detectable physiological effect on the motor end-plate neurotransmitter release in mice. Institute for Research and Development, Universidade do Vale do Paralba (Univap)-SJC, Brazil. renatanicolau@hotmail.com Link Here

    Rochkind S, Nissan M, Alon M, Shamir M and Salame K (2001). Effects of laser irradiation on the spinal cord for the regeneration of crushed peripheral nerve in rats. Lasers Surg Med 28: 216-9. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to examine the recovery of the crushed sciatic nerve of rats after low-power laser irradiation applied to the corresponding segments of the spinal cord. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: After a crush injury to the sciatic nerve in rats, low-power laser irradiation was applied transcutaneously to corresponding segments of the spinal cord immediately after closing the wound by using 16 mW, 632 nm He-Ne laser. The laser treatment was repeated 30 minutes daily for 21 consecutive days. RESULTS: The electrophysiologic activity of the injured nerves (compound muscle action potentials--CMAPs) was found to be approximately 90% of the normal precrush value and remained so for up to a long period of time. In the control nonirradiated group, electrophysiologic activity dropped to 20% of the normal precrush value at day 21 and showed the first signs of slow recovery 30 days after surgery. The two groups were found to be significantly different during follow-up period (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that low-power laser irradiation applied directly to the spinal cord can improve recovery of the corresponding insured peripheral nerve. Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Link Here

    Naeser MA and Deuel SK (1999). Review of second congress, World Association for Laser Therapy meeting (WALT). September 2-5, 1998, Kansas City, MO, USA. J Altern Complement Med 5: 177-80. Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine and Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Massachusetts, USA. mnaeser@bu.edu Link Here

    Stupak VV, Zaidman AM and Serpeninova NN (1998). [The morphological basis for using low-intensity laser radiation in patients with foci of spinal cord contusion]. Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko 36-40. Link Here


    Rochkind S and Ouaknine GE (1992). New trend in neuroscience: low-power laser effect on peripheral and central nervous system (basic science, preclinical and clinical studies). Neurol Res 14: 2-11. The present review summarizes findings in our continuing study of the use of low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) in the treatment of severely injured peripheral (PNS) and central nervous systems (CNS). The radiation method was proposed by Rochkind and has been modified over the last 13 years. LPLI in specific wavelengths and energy density maintains the electrophysiological activity of severely injured peripheral nerve in rats, preventing scar formation (at injury site) as well as degenerative changes in the corresponding motor neurons of the spinal cord, thus accelerating regeneration of the injured nerve. Laser irradiation applied to the spinal cord of dogs following severe spinal cord injury and implantation of a segment of the peripheral nerve into the injured area diminished glial scar formation, induced axonal sprouting in the injured area and restoration of locomotor function. The use of laser irradiation in mammalian CNS transplantation shows that laser therapy prevents extensive glial scar formation (a limiting factor in CNS regeneration) between a neural transplant and the host brain or spinal cord. Abundant capillaries developed in the laser-irradiated transplants, and was of crucial importance in their survival. Intraoperative clinical use of laser therapy following surgical treatment of the tethered spinal cord (resulting from myelomeningocele, lipomyelomeningocele, thickened filum terminale or fibrous scar) increases functional activity of the irradiated spinal cord. In a previous experimental work, we showed that direct laser treatment on nerve tissue promotes restoration of the electrophysiological activity of the severely injured peripheral nerve, prevents degenerative changes in neurons of the spinal cord and induces proliferation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. This suggested a higher metabolism in neurons and improved ability for myelin production under the influence of laser treatment. The tethering of the spinal cord causes mechanical damage to neuronal cell membranes leading to metabolic disturbances in the neurons. For this reason, we believe that using LPLI may improve neuronal metabolism, prevent neuronal degeneration and promote improved spinal cord function and repair. The possible mechanism of LPLI is investigated. Using electron paramagnetic resonance in cell culture models, we found that at low radiation doses, singlet oxygen is produced by energy transfer from porphyrin (not cytochrome as commonly assumed) which is known to be present in the cell. At low concentration, singlet oxygen can modulate biochemical processes taking place in the cell and trigger accelerated cell division. On the other hand, at high concentration, singlet oxygen damages the cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Department of Neurosurgery, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Israel. Link Here

    [This message was edited by mk99 on 06-10-05 at 04:34 PM.]

  7. #37
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    Is the world now finding "scientific legtimacy" for the laserponcture treatments of Albert Bohbott?

    Common everybody, we don't want to be in de-nile. that's a river in Egypt.))

  8. #38
    Senior Member artsyguy1954's Avatar
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    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by joshstevens7
    i believe that with the use of different therapies combined together, we will be all walking again in the near future............

    Josh S.
    T6 complete as of 7/17/03
    I want to really to believe in all this, but on a shitty day I get depressed and will think that all this is once again too good to be true, and nothing will come of it; at least not in time for me. There is too much negativity on this forum and 'newbies' like me get labelled as being 'still in denial' about your fate by the 'oldies' who have been in a wheel chair for a decade or more. When it comes to a prospect for the cure, my emotions go up and down like a roller coaster.

  9. #39
    This was also on datline or 60 min. can't rem. they showed the improvement in the rats
    Last edited by zam; 06-01-2006 at 04:08 AM.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by artsyguy1954
    I want to really to believe in all this, but on a shitty day I get depressed and will think that all this is once again too good to be true, and nothing will come of it; at least not in time for me. There is too much negativity on this forum and 'newbies' like me get labelled as being 'still in denial' about your fate by the 'oldies' who have been in a wheel chair for a decade or more. When it comes to a prospect for the cure, my emotions go up and down like a roller coaster.
    I would be in denial of a cure too, if I had been injured 15 or more
    years before stem cell was being thought of as a potential cure.

    I'm not knocking any of the older injured folks, I have so much respect
    for those who have made it that long.

    But you have to have some optimism when you hear so much about
    stem cell research in the news and in politics.

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