Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: SHOULD I DO CORD DECOMPRESSION SURGERY

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Pakistan
    Posts
    109

    SHOULD I DO CORD DECOMPRESSION SURGERY

    I am c5 c6 3 years post injury.In the first 15 days of my injury Doctors were going to do my decompressive surgery,but i was constantly having tamperature.lateron they decieded not to do it.last year i had new MRI scan and showed it to another neurosurgeon. his remarks were ,,SEVERE COMPRESSION OF SPINAL CORD DECOMPRESSION MAY IMPROVE BUT NO GUARANTEE,, .Now i am thinking whether to mdo cord decompression now or should wait few years for stemcell cure?

    ANY SUGGESTION PLEASE?

    Asif age..23
    e mail omego23@yahoo.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member cementhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    westof Chicago ILL
    Posts
    273
    why wait?compression canstop alot of function.
    stem cells may never guarantee anything either.

  3. #3
    asif, I agree with cementhead. Wise.

  4. #4
    even if someday stem cells do help for SCI , you still want your back (lined up) repaired. i'll be 8 months post and going to seee my n.s. to have a dislocated T4 T5 repaired and pressure off my cord. after being here and learning , that surgery should have been done as soon as i was able, when i was in the hospital. who knows where my injury would be now. get it done.

    i only wanted to have some fun

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    171
    Its a question I`ve often thought about myself. When I was in hospital we were shown x-rays (or mri`s) of our injury sites and I remember seeing the vertbrae that had moved inwards, I thought no more of it until reading about decompression surgery on this site. About 3 years ago I asked a doctor at the spinal unit if the cord had been decompressed, the doctor was evasive but I kept pressing until I was told that it hadn`t been. This may explain why I still have some control of bowel and bladder (only one UTI in 17 years) and feeling all the way down to my toes.

    I find it frustrating at the spinal unit as the emphasis seems to be on making you accept that your injury is permanent. I once demonstrated that I could pull my leg in whilst lying flat and was told that it was a "trick" movement from muscles further up (I am c5/6) which is untrue,you the muscles working when i have no trousers on.

    I just wish I had known about cord compression 17 years ago as I doubt whether decompression would have any effect now.

    ---------

  6. #6
    i just assumed that they did that to everyone automatically?

    im just over one year post...and i couldn't tell you if i've had it done or not...i'm c5/6 injury...dropped to c6 on both sides...could this decompression help me?

    do i get in touch with my neurosurgeon to see if i've had it done?

    don't ever become content with SCI...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    171
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by jayday9:

    i just assumed that they did that to everyone automatically?


    -------


    Thats the mistake I made, I went around for 14 years thinking they had decompressed the injury site, it never occurred to me that they would leave it the way it was. I`m sure that Wise once posted a link to a study on decompression a few years back, it might still be on the site somewhere.


    ---------

  8. #8
    Under what circumstances would a surgeon elect not to perform surgery to decompress? My son's neurosurgeon felt it was imperative that he do the surgery even before his dad and I could make it to the hospital. (We had chartered a plane and were still in the air.) I often wonder if my son has had a pretty good recovery because the doctor chose to take action sooner rather than later.

  9. #9
    LFC, I think that the surgeon did the right thing and it very likely accounted for some of the improvement in the case of your son. I also hope that you son got the high dose steroid methylprednisolone soon after his injury. Most of the centers tha do early decompression also tend to give methylprednisolone early.

    I guess that some centers may choose to wait on thoracic spinal cord injury operations because this often requires opening the chest and his requires team of surgeons incluidng cardiovascular, neurosurgery, and orthopedic surgeons.

    In the 1990's, only 50% of U.S. spinal surgeons were decompressing the spinal cord emergently after spinal cord injury. This was in part because there was the notion (unsubstantiated, in my opinion) tha people with "complete" spinal cord injury would not and indeed cannot benefit from decompression.

    I believe that it is no good to leave the spinal cord compressed and that it needs to be decompressed for the following reasons:
    1. Much animal data indicates that more issue damage occurs if the spinal is compressed after a contusion injury.
    2. Much anecdoal clinical data is available suggesing hat early decompression is important for people.
    3. Several studies have shown that delayed decompression as late as 3 years after injury.

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    68
    i just recently had my spinal cord decompressed a few months ago, a little over a year and a half post injury. i had a bullet lodged in the t-11 area of my spinal cord. there were slight complications because it was a bullet that was removed, but i now have allot more sensation mostly on my right side. i would recommend decompression for anyone that it is medically possible for.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •