Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Why I Lost My SSDI Hearing...

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by LaMemChose View Post
    The assumption of that "joke" is incorrect. (BTW, I have never heard it, but likely would not have either.) I was approved for SSDI based first application. There was need for neither an attorney nor an appeal.

    Also, SSI is not given in Tennessee to working age, ab adults. Ditto for TennCare, Tennessee's version of Medicaid.
    Hope you didn't take offense at this, LaMem. it comes from my friend, an attorney, he does not do SSA law. I am not good at virtual communication.

    I think the point is the gray area disabilities are more likely to encounter the appeal process. My daughter was approved on first application with mental illness at age 18. On the other hand, my nephew, post concussion syndrome, took almost ten years to be approved - without an attorney though. I have an old friend who claims, both daughters receive SSI and are drug addicted. She is raising their children. I don't know.

    In any case, I'm sorry for the circumstance but glad you case was approved without challenge.

    Quote Originally Posted by darkeyed_daisy View Post
    Here is a complete listing of diagnoses that require no attorney or appeal.

    http://www.ssa.gov/disability/profes...ltListings.htm

    Restore your character? What do you mean?

    My code, in 2009, is not on the list. I was coded, "thoracic spine pain" 724.1 until my NS's office changed to a new system sometime last year. I noticed my new codes when reviewing the medical records Friday. 348.0, cerebral cyst and 344.1, paraplegia. There's one record in August last year, with 722.52, Lumbar DDD (Primary), 724.02, Lumbar Stenosis listed above the other two codes. The lumbar related codes are not on my last visit in Jan. this year. Guess the office girls were playing with the new system...LOL!

    I don't know if the new coding will be considered in my request for review, or not. The code probably should have been changed one year after my injury. If I had known then what I know now....

    Should have said, my credibility not character. Without my NS's records my credibility was in question. There was nothing available for the reviewer to reference my word. She also called me out on (medical) MJ noted in pain clinic records. Although MJ was approved when I started the PC and was not an issue for 9 months, the head doc made issue when I refused a morphine pump implant. Bastard! The records show a clean sample when I left the pain clinic. Seems irrelevant, but. I suspect I'm doing more work than is needed anyway.

    Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

    "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
    — Marianne Williamson

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlottes Web View Post
    Hope you didn't take offense at this, LaMem. it comes from my friend, an attorney, he does not do SSA law. I am not good at virtual communication.

    I think the point is the gray area disabilities are more likely to encounter the appeal process. My daughter was approved on first application with mental illness at age 18. On the other hand, my nephew, post concussion syndrome, took almost ten years to be approved - without an attorney though. I have an old friend who claims, both daughters receive SSI and are drug addicted. She is raising their children. I don't know.

    In any case, I'm sorry for the circumstance but glad you case was approved without challenge.




    My code, in 2009, is not on the list. I was coded, "thoracic spine pain" 724.1 until my NS's office changed to a new system sometime last year. I noticed my new codes when reviewing the medical records Friday. 348.0, cerebral cyst and 344.1, paraplegia. There's one record in August last year, with 722.52, Lumbar DDD (Primary), 724.02, Lumbar Stenosis listed above the other two codes. The lumbar related codes are not on my last visit in Jan. this year. Guess the office girls were playing with the new system...LOL!

    I don't know if the new coding will be considered in my request for review, or not. The code probably should have been changed one year after my injury. If I had known then what I know now....

    Should have said, my credibility not character. Without my NS's records my credibility was in question. There was nothing available for the reviewer to reference my word. She also called me out on (medical) MJ noted in pain clinic records. Although MJ was approved when I started the PC and was not an issue for 9 months, the head doc made issue when I refused a morphine pump implant. Bastard! The records show a clean sample when I left the pain clinic. Seems irrelevant, but. I suspect I'm doing more work than is needed anyway.

    MJ is not legal medically in Tennessee.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by LaMemChose View Post
    MJ is not legal medically in Tennessee.
    I know and knew that. It's not legal medically or otherwise. Sorry, I didn't complete my sentence to clarify. The Dr. I saw on first visit and NP's and/or Drs thereafter, for 9 months, had nothing to say about it. I asked if it was a problem, and was told, "it looks like you're doing what works for you, that's good." This had been discussed, including the moral issues, with three of my doctors before the pain clinic (bad) experience. Each doctor told me they had patients that had success with MJ. I had read about the benefits here, both legal and not. I've been unsuccessful with medications for nerve pain and was tired of suffering. I quit when asked. Although I did not like the moral issues and struggled with them, it sure did work for me! I miss it!

    I would like to see it legalized here and if not, in four years will consider moving if my husband can be transferred with his job or find better. There's a big push from the wife of a former Vanderbilt Chancellor for legalization. We'll see.

    In any event, I decided not to touch that comment in the hearing decision; I don't believe it's relevant. My request is signed sealed and ready for blast off to the SSA and Congressman's office! I hope no one ever goes through what I did.

    You're a tough one LaMem, but I like your style... usually, your posts, (your humor), makes me laugh. I'll try to clarify better in the future but warn my mind is primarily in the fast lane.
    Last edited by Charlottes Web; 03-28-2013 at 04:58 AM. Reason: Grammer
    Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

    "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
    — Marianne Williamson

  4. #24
    My "request for review" packages are out of here! Sent Thursday, to SSA and the State Congressman's office Thursday. He had assured he will make the necessary calls to move my case through the system in a timely manner. I will follow up with him. I don't trust anything.

    Saw my NS, inquired about my medical codes. The newer codes were not correct either. For a second, I thought he was going to tell me, it has all been a bad dream, but he said they would be changed to, para - primary, arachnoid cyst (not cerebral cyst), and mentioned disabled. Is that a medical code? If he considers my cervical and lumbar, I'll have more codes. I will order the notes from that visit but doubt I can forward them to the SSA to be added to my file. I will ask but at least forward them to my new friend with the Congressman's office.

    Although, coding was an issue trying to get a manual chair, I did not realize the importance. Thanks for clarifying, and for your help, Daisy. I miss the days when I saw the Dr. every visit but he pointed out, most people in my condition go to the ER, not home to recover, so my hardheadedness the day of the accident may have played a roll in the oversights. What ifs, I'll never know.

    Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

    "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
    — Marianne Williamson

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Somewhere in the Rocky Mountains
    Posts
    8,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlottes Web View Post
    My "request for review" packages are out of here! Sent Thursday, to SSA and the State Congressman's office Thursday. He had assured he will make the necessary calls to move my case through the system in a timely manner. I will follow up with him. I don't trust anything.

    Saw my NS, inquired about my medical codes. The newer codes were not correct either. For a second, I thought he was going to tell me, it has all been a bad dream, but he said they would be changed to, para - primary, arachnoid cyst (not cerebral cyst), and mentioned disabled. Is that a medical code? If he considers my cervical and lumbar, I'll have more codes. I will order the notes from that visit but doubt I can forward them to the SSA to be added to my file. I will ask but at least forward them to my new friend with the Congressman's office.

    Although, coding was an issue trying to get a manual chair, I did not realize the importance. Thanks for clarifying, and for your help, Daisy. I miss the days when I saw the Dr. every visit but he pointed out, most people in my condition go to the ER, not home to recover, so my hardheadedness the day of the accident may have played a roll in the oversights. What ifs, I'll never know.

    I did question why they put cerebral cyst as a diagnosis code. Since you haven't really had ongoing treatment it seems...I may be wrong. Doctor's offices/providers maintain a running list of codes they use. Most billers in Doctors offices are NOT coders but nurses or other office staff etc just guessing from listed codes not actually using the ICD-9 book. It does get specific but not specific enough (that is another topic LOL). It really depends on the experience of the office staff.

    No disabled is not a code or codeable diagnosis however a combination of codes can be used to present a clear picture of the disabling condition. ICD-10 is alot more specific but is not in place yet.

    I do believe your hard-headedness did just that. It is very rare to have the type of tear you have causing your symptoms and there may not be a code specific to that. But paralysis, pain, and all the co-morbid conditions need to be coded to present the true picture. Your physician is not a coder either and they are just as hard-headed as you when it comes to that. They just want to put a diagnosis in the system and get it paid. A good biller can make all the difference in teaching a physician. The more documentation equals better and more easier payment. They are always in a hurry.

    I see now why you had so many problems with this. Pain is truly not a well presented code either although they have added chronic pain and a few others to paint a better picture.

    To explain a little better how it works...the codes paint (for lack of better words) the medical condition. Pain would not be a disabling condition in most cases but add the paralysis, bladder neuropathy, neuropathic pain, and all the other stuff and you get a pretty disabled person. They change the codes every year but the premise stays the same.

    If the coding was an issue for the manual chair then I can definitely see why the judge was so focused on it.

    I believe the documentation is why so many people here have so much trouble getting what they need. Some providers are just better than others. Well some just suck...lol I argued with physicians all the time because they didn't write what was needed in charts on the hospital side. The government and other agencies have stipulations of things that must be in that chart any less and we couldn't bill for the hospital stay. Several of my physicians just wanted to write "the patient is here and now he is gone". I am being tongue in cheek but you get the idea.

    Everything you need is based on that physician's documentation. If it is not there you don't get what you need. Simple as that. I have seen lots of receptionists in doctor's offices just pick a code from the running list. If you are there for a UTI and she picks high blood pressure, the doc isn't getting paid.

    I believe on your request for review you could send additional information. Even though it is not a certified copy of your records (which is what SSA requires), it could help them to request the certified copies knowing that they exist.
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by darkeyed_daisy View Post
    I did question why they put cerebral cyst as a diagnosis code. Since you haven't really had ongoing treatment it seems...I may be wrong. Doctor's offices/providers maintain a running list of codes they use. Most billers in Doctors offices are NOT coders but nurses or other office staff etc just guessing from listed codes not actually using the ICD-9 book. It does get specific but not specific enough (that is another topic LOL). It really depends on the experience of the office staff.

    No disabled is not a code or codeable diagnosis however a combination of codes can be used to present a clear picture of the disabling condition. ICD-10 is alot more specific but is not in place yet.

    I do believe your hard-headedness did just that. It is very rare to have the type of tear you have causing your symptoms and there may not be a code specific to that. But paralysis, pain, and all the co-morbid conditions need to be coded to present the true picture. Your physician is not a coder either and they are just as hard-headed as you when it comes to that. They just want to put a diagnosis in the system and get it paid. A good biller can make all the difference in teaching a physician. The more documentation equals better and more easier payment. They are always in a hurry.

    I see now why you had so many problems with this. Pain is truly not a well presented code either although they have added chronic pain and a few others to paint a better picture.

    To explain a little better how it works...the codes paint (for lack of better words) the medical condition. Pain would not be a disabling condition in most cases but add the paralysis, bladder neuropathy, neuropathic pain, and all the other stuff and you get a pretty disabled person. They change the codes every year but the premise stays the same.

    If the coding was an issue for the manual chair then I can definitely see why the judge was so focused on it.

    I believe the documentation is why so many people here have so much trouble getting what they need. Some providers are just better than others. Well some just suck...lol I argued with physicians all the time because they didn't write what was needed in charts on the hospital side. The government and other agencies have stipulations of things that must be in that chart any less and we couldn't bill for the hospital stay. Several of my physicians just wanted to write "the patient is here and now he is gone". I am being tongue in cheek but you get the idea.

    Everything you need is based on that physician's documentation. If it is not there you don't get what you need. Simple as that. I have seen lots of receptionists in doctor's offices just pick a code from the running list. If you are there for a UTI and she picks high blood pressure, the doc isn't getting paid.

    I believe on your request for review you could send additional information. Even though it is not a certified copy of your records (which is what SSA requires), it could help them to request the certified copies knowing that they exist.
    .
    I'm getting it now, thanks more to you than the NS's office staff or my attorney. I'm so glad you brought the coding to my attention before I completed the request for review. Last year, I was given a prescription for a seating cushion and the office girl coded it "lumbar stenosis"...I did know better than that. That actually could have been when they started messing with my codes but it was also around the same time they changed systems and I also changed NP.

    My NS is busy, but he's good and I trust him. He shook his head side to side when I told him of the coding issue. He said before, he doesn't like the way Dr. have to do things these days. He's a really kind man. This was the second time we've talked about surgery in the last year. He knows I'm suffering and will do the surgery now, if I want, but odds are 50/50, the damage done, is done, and I could come out of it without any use of my legs. I don't want to take the risk. The cyst has caused an indention in my cord that will remain regardless of surgery. I have a disk of CT pictures, if I could figure out how to capture the right image, (haha, or any image), I would add it to my profile. My cord is not flat where the cyst sits but close. Hence me becoming more symptomatic with movement and surgical intervention if it gets bigger.

    You know, I had never been sick in my life, had overcome all types of pain and rehab with my shoulders. I thought until late 2010 the possibility of my spine healing still exsisted; know one told me otherwise, LOL. I named the cyst, Charlotte, and told anyone that asked me what happened, "nothing, I'm fine", and looked at them like they were crazy. I've always thought I was unbreakable, still think in my mind, I'm able bodied, and still try to prove it although I fail everyday. Hardheaded may be an understatement.

    In any event, I found out from my NS, the displacement of my cord at T1 is NOT the cause of the trouble in my hands. In Jan., the NP had said it was. AND, he is going to order the MRI's annually instead of every 6 months. The MRI's makes a mess of me so I'm happy, happy about this!

    Oh, the wheelchair, the Judge was interested in, was the hospital manual, $250.00. The ultralight hasn't been ordered. I started over this year. Waiting to hear from a new DME and get approved by insurance. I'll be more the wiser with respect to medical codes. Maybe I'll get in therapy for my chronic case of denial!

    As always, thank yeeew, Miss Daisy, you are a sweetheart to help!
    Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

    "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
    — Marianne Williamson

  7. #27
    Hi everyone and Charlotte.
    I apologize if I haven't read everything in this thread carefully and am joining the discussion late, but in the SSDI Blue Book , MSK listing 1.04B seems to fit you to a tee, and I assume you also can document 'ineffective ambulation' ( Blue Book MSK preamble 1.00B2b2) based on limitations of how you walk, it seems you should have been a slam dunk for SSDI at the initial determination or at reconsideration.

    If you have any imaging (MRI findings) stating the presence of 'arachnoiditis' or inflammation of the arachnoid layer OR a treating source like your Neurosurgeon stating the word, 'Archnoiditis', in any of his records, preferably an operative note, a good medical consultant could write that up as a Meet or Equals the intent of the MSK listing 1.04B. Throw in painful dysesthesia which I am sure you have which is a reasonable result of your medically determinable impairment of spinal arachnioditis, and credibility wouldn't be necessary as you should meet or equal a listing.

    Furthermore, if you have limitations of handling and fingering from a crushed radial nerve which would erode the Sedentary base to a less than a full range of sedentary, it would seem that in the alternative, you would be a med-vocational allowance even if you could walk and stand /2 hours a day in the context of a 40 hour work week due to limitations of handling and fingering.

    Did you go to a CE exam by SSDI?

    I am sure this has been considered but I just thought I would throw this out there if it helps you.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Somewhere in the Rocky Mountains
    Posts
    8,147
    Arndog, she didn't have all her records at the ALJ hearing much less the ones for the initial determination. I believe her lawyer dropped the ball as well as some of the office people in all these doctor's offices.

    Charlotte, Arndog is wise and works in disability determination in another state. Use his knowledge to your advantage.

    A good doctor and a good biller/coder can get almost any piece of equipment paid for by any provider. With that said, it still has to be medically necessary but documentation is the key and putting it all together to "paint the picture".

    Medicare maintains a list of diagnoses that meet medical necessity for many many routine tests and DME equipment that people have/need in the outpatient setting. If you have ever been asked to sign an "advanced beneficiary notice" then you did not have a diagnosis that met the medical necessity for the test your doctor ordered. There is a fine line where Medicare can say that the biller/coder is helping the physician commit fraud when the biller calls the physician and says "this test or piece of equipment isn't covered". Billing on the physician side/outpatient is completely different than on the hospital/inpatient side. The physician maintains a list of diagnoses that you have or have had. A hospital has to use only what is covered for that visit and what is written in the record. We were not supposed to assist the physician in meeting the "medical necessity" part. Not even many coders understand this but starting out in the billing office of a hospital early in my career helped me help my hospital with lots of billing problems where we were losing money. It included educating the physicians which is not an easy task and some are just not open to education. lol

    So if you have diabetes and received insulin and treatment while an inpatient but the physician did not note it in the chart that you have diabetes, Medicare is not going to pay for any of that treatment. Now most things are covered in the daily charge for inpatient admission but you get the idea.

    or

    If you have an allergy to a commonly used cheap drug. Due to that allergy they have special order a really expensive drug for you. If it is not in that chart why you require that expensive drug, Medicare is going to deny to pay for it.

    I hope this makes sense and helps others with some of their problems getting the medical things they need.

    So what is in your doctors chart is important as you found out Charlotte...very important for you to get the things you need.
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by arndog View Post
    Hi everyone and Charlotte.
    I apologize if I haven't read everything in this thread carefully and am joining the discussion late, but in the SSDI Blue Book , MSK listing 1.04B seems to fit you to a tee, and I assume you also can document 'ineffective ambulation' ( Blue Book MSK preamble 1.00B2b2) based on limitations of how you walk, it seems you should have been a slam dunk for SSDI at the initial determination or at reconsideration.

    If you have any imaging (MRI findings) stating the presence of 'arachnoiditis' or inflammation of the arachnoid layer OR a treating source like your Neurosurgeon stating the word, 'Archnoiditis', in any of his records, preferably an operative note, a good medical consultant could write that up as a Meet or Equals the intent of the MSK listing 1.04B. Throw in painful dysesthesia which I am sure you have which is a reasonable result of your medically determinable impairment of spinal arachnioditis, and credibility wouldn't be necessary as you should meet or equal a listing.

    Furthermore, if you have limitations of handling and fingering from a crushed radial nerve which would erode the Sedentary base to a less than a full range of sedentary, it would seem that in the alternative, you would be a med-vocational allowance even if you could walk and stand /2 hours a day in the context of a 40 hour work week due to limitations of handling and fingering.

    Did you go to a CE exam by SSDI?

    I am sure this has been considered but I just thought I would throw this out there if it helps you.
    Arachnoid cyst is in all of the notes from my NS's office. There's also a clinical note from the NS, explaining the tear, arachnoid cyst, and states I am symptomatic. The term "arachnoidtis" is not in my records. I have MRI's from every 6 months since 2009, and 2 CT myelograms. I haven't had spinal surgery. Unfortunately the Judge didn't have a complete file from my NS. However, I sent them all to the SSA with my request for review form.

    To my favor, she had a complete records and surgical notes from the orthopaedic doctors. Also the doopler reports showing thoracic outlet syndrome; zero pulse with right arm above my head and very faint on the left, were included.

    At the end of my hearing, the Judge presented a hypothetical allowing her to rule in my favor but repeated, she had to make her ruling based on the medical records she had available. She and the voc expert were looking at me with pity. I took it personal, but now I believe they knew my file was incomplete and maybe felt bad for me.

    I was not scheduled for a CE exam by SSA. My attorney had told me they didn't need it in my case.

    Obviously, you know coding better than I. I'm eager to see my shiny new codes. Hoping they will be worth framing! Apparently, the NP's and office gals have been coding my chart. My NS looked disgusted when I told him the outcome of my case and of the coding issues. I'll post the codes when I get a copy of the notes.

    YES, your post helps too, thank you so much for your time. Hopefully with the corrections, the review board will consider me.

    Thanks again, and Happy Easter, Arndog. Hope you are doing well and enjoying the Holiday!
    Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

    "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
    — Marianne Williamson

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by darkeyed_daisy View Post
    Arndog, she didn't have all her records at the ALJ hearing much less the ones for the initial determination. I believe her lawyer dropped the ball as well as some of the office people in all these doctor's offices.

    Charlotte, Arndog is wise and works in disability determination in another state. Use his knowledge to your advantage.

    A good doctor and a good biller/coder can get almost any piece of equipment paid for by any provider. With that said, it still has to be medically necessary but documentation is the key and putting it all together to "paint the picture".

    Medicare maintains a list of diagnoses that meet medical necessity for many many routine tests and DME equipment that people have/need in the outpatient setting. If you have ever been asked to sign an "advanced beneficiary notice" then you did not have a diagnosis that met the medical necessity for the test your doctor ordered. There is a fine line where Medicare can say that the biller/coder is helping the physician commit fraud when the biller calls the physician and says "this test or piece of equipment isn't covered". Billing on the physician side/outpatient is completely different than on the hospital/inpatient side. The physician maintains a list of diagnoses that you have or have had. A hospital has to use only what is covered for that visit and what is written in the record. We were not supposed to assist the physician in meeting the "medical necessity" part. Not even many coders understand this but starting out in the billing office of a hospital early in my career helped me help my hospital with lots of billing problems where we were losing money. It included educating the physicians which is not an easy task and some are just not open to education. lol

    So if you have diabetes and received insulin and treatment while an inpatient but the physician did not note it in the chart that you have diabetes, Medicare is not going to pay for any of that treatment. Now most things are covered in the daily charge for inpatient admission but you get the idea.

    or

    If you have an allergy to a commonly used cheap drug. Due to that allergy they have special order a really expensive drug for you. If it is not in that chart why you require that expensive drug, Medicare is going to deny to pay for it.

    I hope this makes sense and helps others with some of their problems getting the medical things they need.

    So what is in your doctors chart is important as you found out Charlotte...very important for you to get the things you need.
    Did it again and crossed posts with you, Daisy! Oh yeah, I've noticed Arndog is knowledgeable on many levels. I've been an Arndog fan since I came here. Both of you are great assets to CC. Everything makes sense now. Thank you.

    I'm counting on my Dr. being a good coder too! With his years as a NS, I'm guessing he is. He told me he sees trouble with SS disability and patients with arachnoid cysts of the brain. He's a very caring doctor - he's not burned out at all, just busy. He suggested I apply for disability, and I could see his disappointment when I told him I lost, his records were missing, and the coding issue. He was also unhappy that it took his lazy "appointment scheduler and administrative director" almost 2 months to send my last CTreport and allow me an appointment to see him, discuss the results, and surgery. If he holds her responsible, all the better. Her glorified receptionist title has gone to her head. LOL

    I was going to ask, is there a code for low body temperature, automatic nerve dysfunction, or whatever you call it? This is a symptom that created confusion in the ER recently. Low body temperature, blood pressure, and heart rate has been a battle this winter. So bad, taking a shower is dangerous. I want to move South, like yesterday!

    So, once I get my new codes, does that mean I have to go around bitching at the able bodied? Just teasing!

    Happy Easter, Daisy! Hope your project is coming along nicely!
    Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

    "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
    — Marianne Williamson

Similar Threads

  1. Lost my SSDI Hearing; Help?
    By Charlottes Web in forum Work, School, & Money
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-04-2013, 05:54 PM
  2. Hearing Aids
    By bollefen in forum Life
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-22-2012, 01:23 AM
  3. Hearing Repaired: Gene therapy restores guinea pigs' hearing
    By Max in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-20-2005, 08:41 AM
  4. Jokes you keep hearing
    By MaskedCranberry in forum Life
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-12-2005, 05:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •