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Thread: Researching a paper on the ADA and Law Enforcement

  1. #1
    Senior Member novanoin's Avatar
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    Researching a paper on the ADA and Law Enforcement

    I am researching a paper for my Fundamentals of Law Enforcement class (the class where a muscle spasm caused me to kick and trip my professor).

    The assignment is called Freedom and it was supposed to be about a career within the criminal justice system that you were interested in, but he changed my paper.

    He wants me to write about the ADA and Law Enforcement and the Criminal Justice system. He would also like me to touch on how and what tools departments can use to recruit and retain employees with disabilities.

    I have mentioned in a previous thread, on CC, that I have been offered a position in our city's crime lab. The lab already has a higher-level para (i think he told me that he is a T2-T4) that does ballistics testing.

    He told me and showed me how he uses an Easy Stand Evolv XT Mobile Stander for working in the ballistics lab.

    Does anyone have an opinion that I can use in my paper? Ideas?

    Things that have happened to you show my professor (state police district commander) how to better inform and train his officers?

    Thanks for any replies. Let me know if it is okay or not to use in my paper.
    Mimi

  2. #2
    Perhaps you can do something on who (and if) officers are educated about the ADA, esp. related to parking, since that is something that falls within their area for enforcement.

    For example, in the town where my parents lived, at least three times they went to funerals where the off-duty police officers hired to escort the procession to the cemetery were parked in the handicapped parking spaces at the church. My father complained the the officers present and they said, essentially, "we are police officers...we can park wherever we want"!!! As you might expect, there was little or no parking enforcement for handicapped parking elsewhere in the city either.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    Senior Member ZEN12many's Avatar
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    Hi nova

    I really know little to nothing about ADA but I was assuming that there is little to no law enforcement involved (unless you park in a handicap spot without a placard). I thought you had to use the courts and sue. If a restaurant isn't accessible, you don't call a cop; you have to call a lawyer.

    Re employment for people who are handicapped, I know that lots of people on this site are employed but, when I was able bodied and the personnel manager of a department, I insisted that we be ready for a handicap employee (bathroom access, hall ways big enough, nothing too elaborate since this was before my SCI and I still had little knowledge). I never was aware of any person in a wheelchair ever applying for a job with the department where I worked. Another department was in charge of recruitment but I don't think they could have done any better job advertising for the job openings. I don't know why no one in a wheelchair ever applied.

    ZEN
    TM 2004 T12 incomplete

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    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    I'm a service dog handler as well as a board member of the Assistance Dog Advocacy Project.

    One issue thats frequently discussed is police officers being uneducated about service dogs. In many cases individuals who are being denied access due to their service animal call the cops to try and mediate a situation. This becomes a complete toss up, because the officer may not know the law. Even if an officer does not know the law however there are things that can be done such as listening to the SD handler and calling the DOJ hotline to ask questions about service dog law. But many officers are unwilling to learn or ask questions, and feel they have the final word and can do as they choose like the officers KLD mentioned using HC parking spaces. This complicates the situation, and when I advise people I generally say to avoid calling the police because they can make the situation worse instead of better. I think this is quite sad, and wish things were different.

    Its understandable for officers to not be personally informed about service dog or other disability related law, but the attitudes and unwillingness to help is inexcusable. An officer who breaks the law just because he can is worse than a criminal imo. We put our public trust into officers, they have the responsibility to UPHOLD the law. Officers frequently tell civilians that ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it. So why is ignorance of the law, or outright disrespect of the law by police officers tolerated so frequently?
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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    Senior Member novanoin's Avatar
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    Lin, may i use the situation you explained in my thread last week (about accidentally kicking and tripping my professor during class). http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...=214791&page=2

    My explaination is that this professor is a lieutenant in the Indiana State Police and he also has a young son (i think he is 9) with Aspergers. He has said he wants to use my paper for training and education of his officers. He has been with the ISP for 18 years.
    Mimi

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    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    Sure! I can ask my roommate if he'd be interested in talking with you. I have Aspergers as well, but my roommate and I argue over who is "more severely" Aspergers lol. I insist its him, he insists its me... But we have deficits in different areas.

    I've had a lot of run ins with the cops, which sounds so bad lol. But I was homeless for a while in Indianapolis and driving around living in my car. Some police officers were wonderful, some were awful and even harassed me. So like I said I've had those times where officers thought I was being a smart ass by my replies, but never thought to just TELL them I have AS... But then I usually don't realize thats what went wrong until much later after the situation. The memories for me are older, so not so specific as the not-too-long-ago one that happened to my roommate.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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    Work area accessibility: desk height, lab table height, ease of reaching manuals and equipment, ease of accessing a fax machine or printer, maybe a circular file


    I have worked twice with colleagues [Special Ed Teacher, OT] who were visually impaired and needed an attachment for their computers to magnify material which were hard copies and they also had larger monitors at their desks.


    Hard of Hearing and Deaf people who are lip readers could be recruited. An auditory trainer [speaker wheres microphone, listener wears an amplification device] could be used with those who have either hearing aids or cochlear implants.

    I always asked for a waiver for CPR certification and take-down training for out of control students. I was required to attend the trainings though so that I couuld talk someone through the procedure.


    Would you need an accommodation for the physical training and gun range requirements?


    I love the idea of using a stander at work.




    Some employers will buy an extra printer and locate it close to the disabled person's work area as an ADA accomodation. The last few places/schools I worked in the printers were networked and were not always close to where I was working on my computer.

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    sue pendelton mentioned before about how law enforcement needs to be aware of disabilities such as tourettes and how often they get arrested due to their ticks (or something to that effect. i dont remember her exact words)
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
    http://www.elportavoz.com/

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    Senior Member IsMaisin's Avatar
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    When seeking employment, it can help to let the employer know that they will be eligible for tax credits for hiring you. Larger companies with good HR know this and may even have a goal of finding qualified disabled employees.

    Look over this information before an interview. Let your potential employer know up front what accommodation you need and how the tax credits will cover that.

    My brother in law has mild cerebral palsy. He has been stopped by police who thought his walk was because he was drunk.
    Played with bombs- No SCI, Brain Damage enough that I require a chair and a caregiver.

  10. #10
    The NYPD has a woman(with a disability) that works specifically with training officers @ dealing with issues of disability (I soo want her job). I'll try and look for her contact or you may want to google in the process
    Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

    I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

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