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Thread: What skills and knowledge are most important?

  1. #1

    What skills and knowledge are most important?

    I have an opportunity to read, review, and comment on the programed learning texts and inservice training materials used by a company who provides the services of home health aides.

    The materials I am reviewing are:
    Traumatic Brain and Spinal Cord Injuries
    Incontinence and Urinary Tract Infections
    Wheelchair and Bed Positioning and Preventing Pressure Sores
    Dealing with Pressure Sores and Other Wounds
    Bathing
    Dressing and Grooming
    Bowel Care and Management

    I would greatly appreciate it if you would take a moment or two to jot down what you consider to be the most important skills for a home health care aide to have and what skills you find most lacking in home health care aides you have hired.

    If you were writing inservice training materials, what skills and knowledge would you emphasize when caring for someone with a spinal cord injury?

    I think this is a great opportunity to give this company some feedback from the client side, since all of the materials are written from the medical community side.

    All the best,
    GJ

  2. #2
    One of things that I battle with constantly is getting them to use clean and sterile procedures like washing hands, wearing gloves, disposing of dirty things properly, etc. It is probably no different than the lax behavior is in some hospitals. Because of our vulnerability to a broad array of infections this is critical.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  3. #3

  4. #4
    I echo what EUCrach85 said. I'm in school now for healthcare education and recently came across information on the "domains of learning". Some education is in the psychomotor domain which includes physical tasks. The next domain is cognitive and includes understanding the difference between sterile and clean. It is things you need to know. The third domain is affective and it includes attitudes, respect, empathy. I saw education geared to the cognitive and psychomotor domains but nothing related to the emotional or affective knowledge that personal caregivers need.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    caregiver etiquette
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
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  6. #6
    From my experience, seems like the biggest things lacking in the people I’ve interviewed (unfortunately sometimes hired) is a happy attitude, sterile/clean techniques, and dependability.

    We’ve got enough challenges as it is without inviting a complainy grump into our homes. Not really sure why this smile doesn’t come with the job/territory, especially since I’m such a fun hoot to be around, but it seems far too often the caregivers are an unhappy lot that like to bring their moods/problems to work. Then there is the whole not washing hands when arriving at work, not being clean enough when dealing with simple yet extremely important tasks, and sometimes just not showing up at all. Can be a real challenge, so I’m so happy to grab onto the great ones whenever I get them.

    Really don’t understand it either, helping me overall is a pretty good/laid-back job. Almost think, for many caregivers, being a CNA is just a job and if they’ve got any real compassion/drive for it then they quickly move up to being a nurse or something more. Yes, you sometimes get lucky and find the right one who really loves their job, but more often it seems they just going through the paces hating every minute of it, and subsequently hating the person they’re taking care of. So sad, but I guess what can you expect for minimal, minimal pay.
    I am the Quad in Quadomated. Come read about Life and Technology through the Eyes of a Quad
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  7. #7
    Senior Member willingtocope's Avatar
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    Leverage. I'm still a pretty hefty guy, and I'm always concerned that in helping me move, they'll damage themselves.

    As an example, I can shuffle along with a walker, but occasionally, my left leg fails obey my "command" to bend. I've had caregivers who bend over and try to lift the foot off the floor (practically impossible for a 150 lb woman) and I've had others who simply put their leg behind mine and bend their knee and mine at the same time...that works.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
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    Most important attribute for caregivers?

    Common fucking sense, period.
    Treat someone the same way you wish to be treated if you wee in our positions.

    Oh yeah, and by the way: Don't claim you're a caregiver just because you need a job and don't wish to do dishwashing, landscaping, demolition, or housekeeping. Just because you're a nuclear engineering your former country doesn't mean you will necessarily be a good health caregiver to someone here.

  9. #9
    Senior Member IsMaisin's Avatar
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    My wife is my primary caregiver (VA certified and paid too). He biggest frustration is putting aside any emotional or personal issues she has so she can deal with mine when I have a crisis. But without her instant and calm response, I go downhill fast. It's totally not fair, and I try to make it up to her with pampering when I'm in good shape, but that instant suppression of her own needs for mine is critical.
    Played with bombs- No SCI, Brain Damage enough that I require a chair and a caregiver.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by IsMaisin View Post
    My wife is my primary caregiver (VA certified and paid too). He biggest frustration is putting aside any emotional or personal issues she has so she can deal with mine when I have a crisis. But without her instant and calm response, I go downhill fast. It's totally not fair, and I try to make it up to her with pampering when I'm in good shape, but that instant suppression of her own needs for mine is critical.
    NL has been my caregiver everyday for almost 31 years (we've been married nearly 44 years). I am not a veteran, so she is not paid. We are preparing the paper work with an agency, in the event that something catastrophic would happen to her. At least it is a back up and I could get care, albeit expensive, until I could work out other arrangements. We have had interviews with several people at the agency and like their approach. It was through these contacts that we were asked to review their training materials for them.

    "IsMaisin" take good care of that special lady of yours.

    All the best,
    GJ

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