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Thread: AAN Presents 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach

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    AAN Presents 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach

    AAN Presents 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach
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    AMERICAN ACADEMY NEUROLOGY MEETING CONFERENCE MIAMI FL
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    More than 8,000 are expected to attend the American Academy of Neurology's 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, April 9 - 16, 2005. Held in the Miami Beach Convention Center, the very latest research findings on neurological disorders will be presented as platform and poster sessions.



    Newswise - More than 8,000 are expected to attend the American Academy of Neurology's (AAN) 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, April 9 - 16, 2005.

    Held in the Miami Beach Convention Center, the very latest research findings on Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, epilepsy, and other neurological disorders will be included in more than 1,300 scientific studies presented as platform and poster sessions. This meeting will also introduce a new magazine and a gala.

    Key science presentations will be presented at four plenary sessions, starting with the Presidential Plenary Session on April 12 at 9:00 a.m. The outgoing AAN president Sandra F. Olson, MD, will give the Presidential Lecture on "Women in Neurology." Nobel Prize winner Stanley B. Prusiner, MD, will discuss "Synthetic Prions: Diagnosis and Treatment of Prion Disease." Ira Shoulson, MD, will lecture on "Equipoise and the Value of Uncertainty for Randomized Clinical Trials."

    Other plenary sessions will cover Contemporary Clinical Issues and Case Studies (April 13) and Frontiers in Clinical Neuroscience (April 14). The Scientific Program Highlights will conclude the plenary sessions on April 15 beginning at 5:15 p.m. after all educational programs have ended. The chair of the AAN Science Committee, John H. Noseworthy, MD, will moderate a review of the most critical new research presented during this meeting.

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/510340/

    The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 18,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and stroke.

    For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit www.aan.com. The 57th Annual Meeting website is http://am.aan.com.



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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Here is just some abstracts related to sci I found in search at conference

    1)

    [P06.045] Biodegradable Polymer Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Regeneration: II, Optimizing Scaffold Stability To Promote Regeneration

    Anthony J. Windebank, Sandeep Vaishya, Terry K. Schiefer, Bradford L. Currier, Heather E. Olson, BingKun Chen, Syed Ameenuddin, LouAnn Gross, Godard C. de Ruiter, Slobodan I. Macura, Prasanna K. Mishra, W. Richard Marsh, Robert J. Spinner, Michael J. Yaszemski, Rochester, MN

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the best conditions for stabilization of polymer scaffolds in the transected rat spinal cord. BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injuries often result in massive cystic degeneration at the site of injury. Biodegradable polymer scaffolds can bridge the gap between intact and potentially functional proximal and distal cord segments. Scaffolds can be loaded with a supporting or growth promoting cells and can act as a reservoir for the long-term release of biologically active molecules. After injury, spine stability is compromised by bone destruction and local loss of muscle function. Imaging studies demonstrated that polymer scaffolds often moved after implantation resulting in an ineffective bridge. DESIGN/METHODS: Scaffolds with 7 parallel channels were constructed by vacuum molding from poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and loaded with Schwann cells derived from P4 rats or with barium sulfate, an X-ray opaque contrast agent not detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Spinal cord transection was performed at T9/10 in groups of 4-8 rats (300g). Conditions included stabilization with a rigid steel rod, fixation of the scaffold with a hydrogel, direct dural closure and dural repair with a synthetic non-resorbable dural substitute (Gore). Scaffold position was assessed by plain x-ray and by microscopic-MRI. Images were obtained in a Bruker Avance 300, NMR spectrometer equipped with imaging accessories, and 7 Tesla, wide, vertical bore magnet, using a 10mm micro-imaging coil. All images were taken from a 3 dimensional T2 weighted 128´128´128 pixel image (TR 5000, TE 35, TT 22h) with a resolution of 62.5 µm/pixel in each dimension. Axonal regeneration through scaffolds was assessed by neurofilament immuno-staining. RESULTS: Rigid spine fixation reduced scoliosis and improved alignment of scaffolds by x-ray and MRI criteria. Hydrogel fixation did not provide additional benefit. Synthetic dural repair did not decrease scar formation or increase axonal regeneration compared with no repair or repair with a fat pad. The results of direct dural closure in terms of reduction of scar volume will be presented. CONCLUSIONS: Biodegradable polymer grafts provide a mechanism to bridge the ends of the spinal cord after massive destruction of a segment of cord. We are defining surgical approaches to stabilizing the graft with optimal alignment. Ongoing studies include the use of biological glues and constructing scaffolds from alternative polymers. Grafts provide a potential therapeutic approach. They also provide a method to consistently manipulate the micro-environment in the regenerating cord and to measure the effect of varying cellular and molecular constituents of that environment. Supported by: Funding from NIBIB (Grant # R01 EB002390) to A. J. Windebank and M. J. Yaszemski by the Wilson and Mayo Foundations and W. L. Gore and Associates, Inc.
    Category - Neural Repair/Rehabilitation
    SubCategory - Basic Science: Axon Regeneration/Guidance

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 3:00 pm

    Poster Sessions: Neural Repair/Rehabilitation (3:00 PM - 7:00 PM)



    2)

    [S51.001] ASIA Scores Predict Outcomes of Patients with Spinal Epidural Metastases

    Robert L. Ruff, Osama O. Zaidat, Raleigh, NC, Van W. Adamson, Cleveland, OH, Suzanne S. Ruff

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) five level scoring system for completeness of myelopathy is able to predict outcomes of patients with spinal cord compression due to metastatic cancer. We tested three hypotheses. We hypothesized that ASIA scores would predict each of three outcome measures: 1) patient survival, 2) ability to walk and 3) pain level. BACKGROUND: The ASIA scoring system is able to predict outcomes of people with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, its utility for non-traumatic SCI is not known and the ASIA scoring system has not bee applied to patients with myelopathy due to spinal epidural metastasis (SEM), which occur in 5-10% of cancer victims. DESIGN/METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 139 consecutive veterans with an initial SEM treated with glucocorticoids and 36 Gy radiation therapy to a port extending two vertebral bodies beyond the SEM margins. We followed patients for e1 year after RT or until death. We analyzed survival data using Kaplan-Meier life-table estimation. We assessed pain levels using a 0-10 scale. We asked patients their highest pain levels during three 24 hour periods: 1) prior to treatment onset, 2) after treatment finished and 3) two weeks after completion of RT. RESULTS: At presentation the ASIA classification of the patients were: ASIA A-11 patients, B-18, C-26, D-68 and E-16. Pain levels at onset were high and similar for all patients: ASIA A-9.1±0.21, B-8.8±0.26, C-8.8±0.21, D-8.7±0.18, E-8.7±0.30. At presentation, all ASIA A, B and C patients were not ambulatory and all the ASIA D and E patients could walk. After completion of RT the number of patients who could walk according to initial ASIA level were: A-0(0%), B-6(33%), C-20(77%), D-67(99%) and E 16(100%). Patients with incomplete myelopathy (ASIA B or C) were more likely to regain ambulation with RT (0% vs 59%, p=0.006). The risk ratio for regaining ambulation for ASIA C compared with ASIA B patients was 2.31 with 95% CI of 1.60-3.33). Pain levels after completion of RT were related to initial ASIA levels: A 6.6±0.39, B-6.1±0.26, C-3.3±0.97, D-2.3±0.15 and E-2.2±0.29 (p<0.001). Pain levels two weeks after RT were not appreciably changed. Patients who could walk after RT had lower pain levels (2.3±0.19 vs 6.3±0.35; p < 0.001). Median survival (weeks) was related to initial ASIA level: ASIA A-4, B-41, C-86, D-110 and E-146 (p<0.001) Median survivals were 104 weeks for patients who could walk after RT compared with 6 weeks for non-ambulatory patients (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Pain levels, walking ability and survival were correlated to the initial ASIA level for patients with SEM. Patients with SEM have better outcomes if treatment starts before severe myelopathy develops; therefore, they deserve expedient treatment. Supported by: Rehabilitation Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    Category - Neural Repair/Rehabilitation
    SubCategory - Clinical: Spinal Cord Injury

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 1:30 pm, C 124

    Scientific Sessions: Neural Repair/Rehabilitation (1:30 PM - 3:30 PM)



    3)

    [S51.004] Psychological or Physiological: Why Are Quadriplegic Patients Content?

    Fatima de N. Abrantes Pais Shelton, Joyce K. Friedman, William R. Lovallo, Elliott D. Ross, Oklahoma City, OK

    OBJECTIVE: To assess effects of spinal cord injury (SCI) on perceived health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL). BACKGROUND: SCI is physically disabling, socially handicapping, romantically limiting. Nevertheless, little is known about post-SCI neurocognitive and psychosocial life. Better understanding of cognitive and emotional worlds of SCI patients is essential to better address/meet, their needs/expectations. DESIGN/METHODS: Twenty subjects with high-cord (T6-&-above) complete (ASIA-A) SCI (HighSCI) were compared to nine subjects with low-cord (T7-&-below) ASIA-A SCI (LowSCI) and to eleven able-bodied Controls. Satisfaction-With-Life and SF-36 instruments were used to assess physical and emotional aspects of HRQOL. ANOVA's were used to assess potential differences across groups. RESULTS: Overall, HRQOL was the same among the groups. Expectedly, HighSCI's & LowSCI's reported lower physical functioning than Controls (p<0.0001). But, oddly, there were no differences in perceived physical role, physical health, or social functioning. Furthermore, HighSCI's reported better perceived mental health than Controls (p=0.004) and a trend over LowSCI's (p=0.06), better perceived emotional role in society (p=0.02), and greater vitality (p=0.01) than LowSCI's and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Despite severe physical disability and medical complications, HighSCI's report better-than-average HRQOL, being overall content. Reasons are unclear. Psychological adaptive reactions are likely, but the possible role of physiological and neurocognitive changes need further exploration. Supported by: Rehabilitation Research & Development Service, Veterans Health Administration, Research Career Award.
    University of Oklahoma Health Science Center General Clinical Research Center grant M01-RR 14467, National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health.
    Category - Neural Repair/Rehabilitation
    SubCategory - Clinical: Spinal Cord Injury

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 2:15 pm, C 124

    Scientific Sessions: Neural Repair/Rehabilitation (1:30 PM - 3:30 PM)



    4)

    [P06.054] BrainGate Neural Interface System: Feasibility Study of a Human Neuromotor Prosthesis

    Leigh R. Hochberg, Boston, MA, Jon A. Mukand, Gerhard M. Friehs, Providence, RI, John P. Donoghue, Foxborough, MA

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and feasibility of using intracortical recordings for direct control of an external device by persons with tetraplegia. BACKGROUND: The firing patterns of primary motor cortex (M1) neurons contain information about the direction, velocity, and force of movement. With advances in chronic intracortical recording technologies, several laboratories have shown that a monkey can gain direct, on-line control over an external device using only the neural signals recorded from its cortex. Because M1 remains relatively intact in spinal cord injury (SCI) and a host of other paralyzing illnesses, it is hoped that by directly linking M1 activity to a computer, persons with tetraplegia will be able to regain functional independence, first by directing an Environmental Control Unit, and eventually by regaining control of their own limbs. Toward that goal, we report preliminary results from the ongoing BrainGate Neural Interface System pilot clinical trial. DESIGN/METHODS: Five participants will be recruited (FDA Investigational Device Exemption). Participants must be tetraplegic for > 1 year secondary to SCI, stroke, or muscular dystrophy; able to speak; and be medically stable. A 4x4mm array of 100 microelectrodes is placed into the arm-hand area of the dominant M1; the array is attached to a connector that is secured to the skull and conveys the neural signals to the remainder of the BrainGate system: an amplifier, a neural spike discriminator, a decoder that converts neuronal activity into cursor command signals, and a set of flat-panel monitors.
    Following post-operative recovery, participants return home. At least once per week for one year, participants will attempt to gain cursor control using only their thoughts. Device safety will be monitored and recorded; feasibility will be determined by the ability to discriminate multiple neurons and by the participant's ability to demonstrate direct cursor control. RESULTS: The BrainGate device was placed in participant #1 in June, 2004. Surgery and recovery were uneventful. Multiple neurons have been recorded at every recording session since August 2004. The participant has gained control over a computer cursor. Furthermore, using a specially developed desktop and interface, he has adjusted his television volume and channel, opened simulated e-mail messages, "drawn" simple pictures, and opened and closed a model robotic hand. Additional neuronal ensemble and direct brain-to-computer results will be presented. CONCLUSIONS: Intracortically-based brain-computer interfaces have the potential to provide improved independence, environmental control, and mobility to persons with paralyzing injuries or illnesses. The safety and efficacy of the BrainGate Neural Interface System is undergoing continued evaluation in this pilot trial. Intracortically-based electrode arrays may also prove useful in other clinical scenarios, including seizure monitoring and suppression, and rehabilitation for persons with severe motor disabilities resulting from stroke or neuromuscular disease. Supported by: Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems, Inc.
    Category - Neural Repair/Rehabilitation
    SubCategory - Clinical: Prosthetic/Orthotic Devices

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 3:00 pm

    Poster Sessions: Neural Repair/Rehabilitation (3:00 PM - 7:00 PM)



    5)

    [S51.002] Directed Rehabilitation Reduces Depression and Pain and Increases Independence and Life Satisfaction for Patients with Paraplegia Due to Epidural Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    Van W. Adamson, Suzanne S. Ruff, Robert L. Ruff, Cleveland, OH

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if directed rehabilitation positively impacts survival, depression, pain, self-perceived satisfaction with life and independence for veterans who are non-ambulatory after treatment of a spinal epidural metastasis (SEM). We hypothesized that rehab would reduce pain and depression and improve survival, independence and life satisfaction. BACKGROUND: Spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) occur in 5-10% of cancer victims. Our six year study of 139 veterans with SEM showed that 22% of patients could not walk after SEM treatment (Neurology 58:1360-6, 2002). The 30 non-ambulatory patients had higher pain levels and shorter survivals. DESIGN/METHODS: We compared 12 consecutive veterans (paraplegic after SEM treatment) who received 2 weeks of directed rehabilitation with a historical control group composed of the 30 consecutive paraplegic veterans from our prior study (Neurology 58:1360-1366, 2002) who did not receive not rehabilitation. SEM and pain treatment were the same for both groups. Intervention: Two week rehabilitation program emphasizing patient and care-giver training on transfers, bowel and bladder care, incentive spirometry, nutrition, and skin care. Outcome Measures: survival, pain levels, depression, independence for transfers and satisfaction with life. Pain was assayed using a 0 to 10 scale: before, after, and 2wk after the spinal epidural metastasis treatment. Survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier life table estimation methods. Depression was assayed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, 2nd edition) and Satisfaction with Life with the Diener scoring scale. We evaluated pain medications usage (opioid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)) using equi-analgesic conversion table. RESULTS: Age and cancer distributions of the groups were similar, but survivals were very different. Median survivals for controls was 6wk and 26 wk for the study group (p<0.001). Death due to complications of myelopathy was 0% in the study group and 47% in the controls (p=0.0003). Two weeks after SEM treatment, rehabilitated patients had less pain (4.2±0.28 vs 6.4±0.35, p <.01) in spite of using less pain medication (either opioid or NSAID + opioid). Two weeks after SEM treatment, 8/12 veterans in the study group became independent for transfers versus 0/30 in control group (p<.001) and 9/12 in the study group returned home vs. 6/30 in the control group (p <.001). Rehabilitated patients had lower BDI scores (13.2 ± 3.7 vs.36.5 ± 2.7, p<0.001) and higher Diener scores (27 ±0.59 vs. 11.2±0.51, p<0.001) indicating less depression and higher satisfaction with life. CONCLUSIONS: Directed rehabilitation reduced depression, pain levels and pain medication use and increased mobility and survival. BDI scores indicatd that rehabilitated subjects had minimal depression and that non-rehab subjects were moderately depressed. Diener scores indicated that the rehabilitated patients were satisfied with life and the non-rehab patients were dissatisfied. Supported by: Rehabilitation Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    Category - Neural Repair/Rehabilitation
    SubCategory - Clinical: Spinal Cord Injury

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 1:45 pm, C 124

    Scientific Sessions: Neural Repair/Rehabilitation (1:30 PM - 3:30 PM)



    6)

    [S51.002] Directed Rehabilitation Reduces Depression and Pain and Increases Independence and Life Satisfaction for Patients with Paraplegia Due to Epidural Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    Van W. Adamson, Suzanne S. Ruff, Robert L. Ruff, Cleveland, OH

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if directed rehabilitation positively impacts survival, depression, pain, self-perceived satisfaction with life and independence for veterans who are non-ambulatory after treatment of a spinal epidural metastasis (SEM). We hypothesized that rehab would reduce pain and depression and improve survival, independence and life satisfaction. BACKGROUND: Spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) occur in 5-10% of cancer victims. Our six year study of 139 veterans with SEM showed that 22% of patients could not walk after SEM treatment (Neurology 58:1360-6, 2002). The 30 non-ambulatory patients had higher pain levels and shorter survivals. DESIGN/METHODS: We compared 12 consecutive veterans (paraplegic after SEM treatment) who received 2 weeks of directed rehabilitation with a historical control group composed of the 30 consecutive paraplegic veterans from our prior study (Neurology 58:1360-1366, 2002) who did not receive not rehabilitation. SEM and pain treatment were the same for both groups. Intervention: Two week rehabilitation program emphasizing patient and care-giver training on transfers, bowel and bladder care, incentive spirometry, nutrition, and skin care. Outcome Measures: survival, pain levels, depression, independence for transfers and satisfaction with life. Pain was assayed using a 0 to 10 scale: before, after, and 2wk after the spinal epidural metastasis treatment. Survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier life table estimation methods. Depression was assayed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, 2nd edition) and Satisfaction with Life with the Diener scoring scale. We evaluated pain medications usage (opioid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)) using equi-analgesic conversion table. RESULTS: Age and cancer distributions of the groups were similar, but survivals were very different. Median survivals for controls was 6wk and 26 wk for the study group (p<0.001). Death due to complications of myelopathy was 0% in the study group and 47% in the controls (p=0.0003). Two weeks after SEM treatment, rehabilitated patients had less pain (4.2±0.28 vs 6.4±0.35, p <.01) in spite of using less pain medication (either opioid or NSAID + opioid). Two weeks after SEM treatment, 8/12 veterans in the study group became independent for transfers versus 0/30 in control group (p<.001) and 9/12 in the study group returned home vs. 6/30 in the control group (p <.001). Rehabilitated patients had lower BDI scores (13.2 ± 3.7 vs.36.5 ± 2.7, p<0.001) and higher Diener scores (27 ±0.59 vs. 11.2±0.51, p<0.001) indicating less depression and higher satisfaction with life. CONCLUSIONS: Directed rehabilitation reduced depression, pain levels and pain medication use and increased mobility and survival. BDI scores indicatd that rehabilitated subjects had minimal depression and that non-rehab subjects were moderately depressed. Diener scores indicated that the rehabilitated patients were satisfied with life and the non-rehab patients were dissatisfied. Supported by: Rehabilitation Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    Category - Neural Repair/Rehabilitation
    SubCategory - Clinical: Spinal Cord Injury

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 1:45 pm, C 124

    Scientific Sessions: Neural Repair/Rehabilitation (1:30 PM - 3:30 PM)



    7)


    [P03.035] On the Autonomic Dysreflexia Induced by Gastrointestinal (GI) Distensions after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Francisco A. Gondim, Augusto C. de A. Lopes, Jr., Paula R. M. Cruz, Sara G. Souza, Dário A. F. Queiroz, Bruno A. Medeiros, Armenio A. Santos, Francisco H. Rola, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of gastric (GD) and colonic (CD) distensions on the mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), gastric emptying (GE) and GI transit of liquid in SCI rats. BACKGROUND: CD causes hypertension with or without associated bradycardia (autonomic dysreflexia - AD) in rats and men with cervical or high thoracic SCI (Am J Physiol 268; H2077, 1995). However, to our knowledge the effects of GD or the possible existence of other forms of localized AD (not accompanied by hemodynamic changes) have not been studied experimentally. DESIGN/METHODS: Wistar rats (180-220g, N=82) were divided into 2 protocols: 1. bowel cleansing with lactulose (3ml)+48h fasting with water ad libitum followed by carotid artery cannulation+ transection between T4-T5. A day later, a catheter was introduced or not (control) in the rectum, coupled to a balloon (D=1 cm) in its end. After 1 minute, we distended the balloon with 0.4 or 1ml of water throughout 1 min. After 5min, the animals were gavage-fed (1.5ml) with the test meal (0.05g/ml phenol red solution with 5% glucose) and sacrificed 10 minutes later. Dye recovery in the stomach, proximal, medial and distal small intestine were measured by spectrophotometry. 2. Evaluation of the presence of AD after a series of 4 GI distensions (CD+CD+GD+GD; GD+GD+CD+CD or CD+CD+CD+CD) with a colonic balloon or intragastric saline injection of 5 ml through a catheter. MAP, HR and intra-ballon pressure (IBP) were continuously registered in a biological signal acquisition system (PowerLab© AD Instruments). Dye recovery in the different groups and segments (mean±SEM) were compared by One-Way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test. RESULTS: Protocol 1: CD (0.4 and 1 ml) both delayed GE by 29 and 38%, respectively. Proximal small intestine dye recovery decreased by 31 and 55%, respectively (P<0.05). The simple insertion of the rectal catheter did not alter (P>0.05) the dye recovery in the different segments (as compared to control values). CD with 0.4 ml of water increased IPB to 60 mmHg, but MAP and HR remained unchanged. CD with 1 ml of water increased both IPB to 90mmHg and MAP by 20 mmHg (P<0.05).
    Protocol 2: GD increased MAP by 9-21.9% while CD increased MAP by 14-39% in rats with C7-T1 or T4-T5 transections (P<0.05). This increase in MAP was less frequent after repeated distensions (either GD and CD). Sequential distension in one site (GD or CD) significantly attenuated the response in another site. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, these findings are the first evidence that 1.AD may be manifested by isolated inhibition of GI motility without concomitant hemodynamic changes (enhancement of inhibitory GI reflexes); 2.GD induces a less exuberant form of AD than CD; 3.The magnitude of AD decreased after repeated distensions; 4.Distension in one site may alter the AD response triggered in another site. These findings support the concept that upper GI dysfunction in SCI patients may be attenuated by the treatment of the dysfunctional lower GI tract. Supported by: FUNCAP and CNPq
    Category - Autonomic Disorders
    SubCategory - Basic Science

    Wednesday, April 13, 2005 7:30 am

    Poster Sessions: Autonomic Disorders (7:30 AM - 12:00 PM)



    8)

    [S49.001] Pregabalin Safely and Efficaciously Treats Chronic Central Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

    Phillip J. Siddall, Michael Cousins, Sydney, Australia, Andreas Otte, Freiburg, Germany, Kem Phillips, Teresa Griesing, New York, NY

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for the treatment of central neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI). BACKGROUND: Pregabalin has demonstrated efficacy and safety in the treatment of neuropathic pain (NeP) associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. Results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for the treatment of central NeP due to SCI are described. DESIGN/METHODS: This 13-week trial (1-week baseline phase + 12-week double-blind treatment) randomized 137 patients to either escalating doses of 150, 300, and 600 mg/day (BID) of pregabalin (n=70) or placebo (n=67). All patients had been diagnosed with central NeP pain due to non-progressive traumatic SCI. Stable doses of pain medication, including opioids and antidepressants, were allowed. The primary efficacy variable was endpoint mean pain score (11-point scale). Secondary efficacy measures included responder rates, pain related sleep interference and Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC). RESULTS: Patients were well matched demographically. Mean age was 50.1 years (range, 21-80), and mean baseline pain scores were 6.7±1.4 (placebo group) and 6.5±1.2 (pregabalin group). Endpoint mean pain was significantly lower in pregabalin treated patients versus placebo: 4.66 vs. 6.20 (P<0.001). At endpoint, significantly more pregabalin-treated patients met 30% responder criteria (42% pregabalin vs. 16.4% PBO), had a reduction in sleep interference (p<0.0001 vs. PBO) and reported improvement in PGIC scores (p<0.001 vs. PBO). The most common adverse events (AEs) were somnolence, dizziness, asthenia, dry mouth, constipation, edema, and amnesia. Discontinuations due to AEs were 21.4% for patients on pregabalin and 13.4% for patients on placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this trial show that pregabalin is an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment for central NeP due to SCI. These data contribute to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that pregabalin has clinically meaningful utility across a broad range of NeP syndromes. Supported by: Pfizer Global Pharmaceuticals
    Category - Headache and Pain
    SubCategory - Genetics

    Thursday, April 14, 2005 1:30 pm, D 131

    Scientific Sessions: Optimizing Treatment of Migraine, Aura and Central Pain. Headache After Aneurysmal Repair, Migraine and Ischemic Stroke (1:30 PM - 3:30 PM)



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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Wise,

    Are you going to attend?

    Thanks



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  4. #4
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Max:

    Wise,

    Are you going to attend?

    Thanks






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    Late-Breaking Science Presented at the 57th AAN Annual Meeting

    Late-Breaking Science Presented at the 57th AAN Annual Meeting
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    AAN EPILEPSY CHARCOT MARIE PARKINSON'S FL
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    Three late-breaking scientific abstracts will be presented during the AAN 57th Annual Meeting.



    Newswise - The following are late-breaking scientific abstracts that will be presented during the American Academy of Neurology 57th Annual Meeting held in Miami Beach, Fla., April 9 - 16, 2005.

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/511030/



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    AAN Sums up Scientific Highlights from 57th Annual Meeting

    AAN Sums up Scientific Highlights from 57th Annual Meeting
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    DEMENTIA PARKINSON'S ALS CANCER MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS NEUROLOGY
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    New insights into risk factors for Parkinson's disease and stroke, new understanding of disease mechanisms in MS, and new treatment possibilities for pain, epilepsy, and ALS were among the scientific highlights at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.



    Newswise - New insights into risk factors for Parkinson's disease and stroke, new understanding of disease mechanisms in multiple sclerosis, and new treatment possibilities for pain, epilepsy, and ALS were among the scientific highlights at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), where results from more than 1,400 scientific studies were presented.

    Some of the most important findings were presented in a plenary session moderated by John H. Noseworthy, MD, chair of the AAN Science Committee and Scientific Program Subcommittee and chair of the department of neurology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Highlights included:

    Parkinson's Disease
    Active duty military service increases the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to researchers from California. Men who served in World War II and Vietnam were twice as likely to develop Parkinson's as those who were in the military at the same time but were not deployed overseas. [S27.005] Meanwhile, taking ibuprofen, but not other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the risk of Parkinson's by about 40 percent in both men and women, adding to the growing list of conditions for which NSAIDs appear to offer protection. [P05.073]

    The known genes for Parkinson's disease account for only a small percent of all cases. At the meeting, researchers described the most recent gene discovery, LRRK2, whose function is not yet known, which may be responsible for up to one percent of all Parkinson's cases, and six percent or more of inherited forms. [S17.001]

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/511338/



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