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Thread: Jerry Silver and Other Discussion from ChinaSCINet Update

  1. #221
    Quote Originally Posted by c473s View Post
    Scar or no scar Dr. Silver will not be taking his work into humans unless he changes heart from what he said at a recent conference. He said he didn't need any more money for research since he was not interested in being involved in translating his rat work to a larger animal or primate model or work to see the research reach human studies. He said that was for someone else to pick up and run with.
    GRAMMY, is that true?

  2. #222
    Quote Originally Posted by kivi66 View Post
    GRAMMY, is that true?
    She should be here soon to add meat to my limited comment and add accuracy to what was said. I tend to be way too short with my words.

  3. #223
    Quote Originally Posted by c473s View Post
    Scar or no scar Dr. Silver will not be taking his work into humans unless he changes heart from what he said at a recent conference. He said he didn't need any more money for research since he was not interested in being involved in translating his rat work to a larger animal or primate model or work to see the research reach human studies. He said that was for someone else to pick up and run with.
    Wow, that's pretty crazy.

  4. #224
    Quote Originally Posted by crabbyshark View Post
    Wow, that's pretty crazy.
    Not really. Maybe he knows more than he can disclose..

  5. #225
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby2 View Post
    Did you ever consider Albany Medical Center for part of the SCI Network in the US. They already conducted one experiment, plus they opened the dura to inject the cells, something you said most American surgeons hesitate to do.
    Bilby,

    I have always been an admirer of Washington University and Albany Medical Center for their spinal cord injury transplant work to date. We have been looking for centers that have experience with transplants. My limitation is funding and I have been relying on centers that have volunteered to be part of the network. As we get more funding, we weil approach more centers.

    Wise.

  6. #226
    Quote Originally Posted by c473s View Post
    She should be here soon to add meat to my limited comment and add accuracy to what was said. I tend to be way too short with my words.
    Hummm...adding "meat" to the comment?
    I would have to say Dr. Silver is right on the pork and primate issue. His area of expertise for 30 some years is in-vivo and in-vitro work on mice and rats. That's a far cry from capabilities needed to handle hogs and primates in a research facility. There is no such facility in Cleveland like the one that Mark has in California. Dr. Silver is not a man of large stature and working pigs first of all is not as easy as folks seem to think it is. Take my word for it, it's best that Dr. Silver not get into a pen full of pork. It is best that he turns his research over to the next team up or someone who is well versed and capable of handling these larger animals in the right facility when the research gets to this final stage. His lab on the second floor of the medical science building is not big enough for pigs or primates, nor is this his area of expertise. Whomever takes on this later stage project should indeed need to have their own project funding. He would have no expertise in the animals there, the care, human labor or research costs connected at someone else's facility in another state and academic institution, nor would he be familiar with the laws of that state. He would do the same as all the other scientists do...they hand it off to the next best team to translate. It's highly unlikely he would attempt to reinvent the wheel. A lot of what happens during these various stages of development are designed by the biotech companies that plan to go to the FDA with the data of the CRO. It is much faster and streamlined as compared to someone with no experience in it trying to run the show. That would be a recipe for disaster. Dr. Silver would help with anything needed within his area of expertise and has stated such many, many times. He's made no pretense however about trying to act as a CRO when that is not in his area of expertise. Anyway, that's been my understanding so far. We somehow have this odd notion in the sci community that this is the norm when in fact the opposite is true. In fact, 99.99% of research scientists in any field do not take their own discovery to the bedside by themselves.

  7. #227
    "We somehow have this odd notion in the sci community that this is the norm when in fact the opposite is true. In fact, 99.99% of research scientists in any field do not take their own discovery to the bedside by themselves."
    Well, I thought he is a rare exception.

  8. #228
    Geoffrey Raisman once told me "a cure has to be a collaborative effort." I remember on a documentary he said that although he had found what he thought was an important piece of the puzzle it was no more all of it than if they were trying to build a brick cathedral and here he was standing with one brick in his hand. It may be made of bricks, if it were a brick cathedral, but you can't build the whole thing in one go and it will take the collaborative effort of many people.

    Geoffrey Raisman was the first person to use an electron microscope and observe that the brain constantly made new connections - he was laughed at by the scientific community but it is now an accepted fact that the brain is plastic.

    Anyway, all I'm saying is that someone like Jerry can work on his area(s) of expertize and, as Grammy says, collaborate with whomever it is necessary to continue the work forward.

    The idea of one gallant researcher independently concocting a cure from start to finish is overly simplistic.

  9. #229
    Quote Originally Posted by kivi66 View Post
    "We somehow have this odd notion in the sci community that this is the norm when in fact the opposite is true. In fact, 99.99% of research scientists in any field do not take their own discovery to the bedside by themselves."
    Well, I thought he is a rare exception.
    My primary mission in doing SCI research is to help bring whatever good we do in our lab to people. I do not have the capacity to do this myself because I spend so much time in the day-to day activities in my lab, helping my students, writing grants (endlessly), reviewing manuscripts, editorship duties, teaching, outside seminars etc. However, I am quite serious about my clinical commitment so I have and will continue to invest a strong effort in transferring our technology with the help of others who are far more capable of translational endeavors. In the mid 1990’s, I was the founding scientist of Gliatech, one of the first start-up biotech’s in the mid-west who pioneered the very first FDA approved anti-fibrotic gel called Adcon. This is a proteoglycan-like barrier that has been used in over 100,000 people worldwide to prevent painful adhesion formation (but simultaneously allowing for healing) within a number of regions of the body, such as in peripheral nerve entrapments, failed back syndrome, gut adhesions, tendon adhesions, heart adhesions, implant adhesions etc. Unfortunately, the management of the company totally screwed things up, got into trouble with the FDA, went bankrupt and the licenses and royalties of the invention have gone somewhere in Europe. An absolutely wonderful product that I invented that is unavailable to people in the US. Next, I helped found Acorda Therapeutics in hopes of bringing chondroitinase to people. I am no longer on their board and I am totally frustrated by their lack of progress. I am helping the ISRT in anyway possible to bring chondroitinase to SCI people. Lastly, our new peptide that we have so much hope for has composition of matter IP and is now being shopped by the university to big pharma to bring this exciting technology to the people ASAP. So you are utterly wrong that I don’t wish to bring my science to the people. In terms of funding, you may be referring to a statement that I made at my first W2W symposium. The point I was trying to make (but this didn’t come out quite right) was that I had not come to W2W to solicit money like some others (who I will not name) did. I also believe that there are substantial funds available for SCI research out there (especially from the NIH and certain private foundations) but I am sickened that so much money is being funneled into fundamentally flawed science and is being overly hyped to create a sense of false hope in an effort to bankroll certain labs. Typically these labs have no NIH funding and depend on philanthropy for their survival. Of course, there is a need for more funding, but I think we can make substantial progress with the money that is available now in the field of SCI if we keenly focus our efforts worldwide on CHRONIC SCI models

  10. #230
    "Of course, there is a need for more funding, but I think we can make substantial progress with the money that is available now in the field of SCI if we keenly focus our efforts worldwide on CHRONIC SCI models."
    Thanks, Jerry, the clouds have dispersed.

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