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Thread: 15x17+2 80 Degree TiLite TR3

  1. #11
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if TiLite is still doing the 'reinforced frame' game or not, but could you do me a favor and check something for me? I'd be really curious if the frame holes for the backrest hinges are flanged or not in the TR3 series. Could you pull a bolt out and see if the hole is just straight through bare tubing, or is there a flange welded in the tubing where the hole is?

  2. #12
    One question SCI_OTR, when you say that frame length is 26,2" it's measure like this, from the front of the tube to the rear of of the wheel ?
    The reason for my question is that I request a CAD from Tilite for a ZRA (at the right time I will post all the information and doubts) with 18" depth , 18" Front / 15.5" Rear Heights, 24" wheels and they give me 34" of length in CAD draw.
    Is this difference because of the different model of chairs ?


  3. #13
    See related posts in the CareCure CAD Repository about Occupied Frame Length (front of back post to front of footrest). TiLite only provides it on request.

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...8&postcount=60


  4. #14
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxrodas View Post
    One question SCI_OTR, when you say that frame length is 26,2" it's measure like this, from the front of the tube to the rear of of the wheel ?
    The reason for my question is that I request a CAD from Tilite for a ZRA (at the right time I will post all the information and doubts) with 18" depth , 18" Front / 15.5" Rear Heights, 24" wheels and they give me 34" of length in CAD draw.
    Is this difference because of the different model of chairs ?
    It looks like you're talking about different measurements. You appear to be talking about the total frame length, because the picture you show is incorrect for that number. If you go to the CAD drawing for that chair (link was in the first post) the total frame length (your black line) is 33.7.

    26.2 refers to OFL, which is back frame post to front of foot rest


    To understand the measurement SCI is referring, you should do as he said and read past posts about what occupied frame length (formerly known as the schulte dimension, so you can search for that here too) is.
    Last edited by ~Lin; 12-26-2012 at 12:38 AM. Reason: add photo
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  5. #15
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    See related posts in the CareCure CAD Repository about Occupied Frame Length (front of back post to front of footrest). TiLite only provides it on request.

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...8&postcount=60
    are we no longer referring to this as the "schulte dimension"?

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by jschism View Post
    are we no longer referring to this as the "schulte dimension"?
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    The only way I can be confident that the experienced user is "actually going to get exactly what they want" is to sit down with them and go line by line through the entire order form (just like anyone else I see). At some point, we will roll their current chair up against a wall so that the footrest is touching, and measure the distance from the wall to the front of the back post near the hinge. I then request a CAD drawing with specific instructions to include in the drawing the distance from the front of the back post to the front of the footrest. In the past, I have referred to this as the "Schulte Dimension".

    Since my New Years resolution is to persuade every custom wheelchair manufacturer who provides a CAD drawing to include it as a standard spec, I've elected re-name it Occupied Frame Length (OFL).
    see this post for more about "OFL" from SCI_OTR, who coined the term "Schulte Dimension" after he had a conversation with Mr Schulte from Invacare. I sense OFL is a more generic term, thus more acceptable to all manufacturers.
    Chas
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  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by chasmengr View Post
    see this post for more about "OFL" from SCI_OTR, who coined the term "Schulte Dimension" after he had a conversation with Mr Schulte from Invacare. I sense OFL is a more generic term, thus more acceptable to all manufacturers.
    That's what I'm hoping for. If this dimension can gain a broader acceptance among end users and professionals who are involved in wheelchair prescription, it has the potential to change how even the less-custom rigid frames are spec'd.

    Did you know that TiLite already includes the OFL on their order form for their least custom rigid frame? Apparently, neither do they!



    Any rigid frame has an OFL, and an individual CAD drawing is not necessarily mandatory if manufacturers were to provide that information. Sure, a "generic" OFL will not be as accurate as an OFL in a CAD (especially lower frame angles with long seat-to-footrest measurements), but this information would still be helpful to determine the optimal frame angle and whether a traditional or "performance" frame would work best for the person.



    One of the main applications of OFL is to determine the space that is required in order for an individual to fit in a chair with their hips and knees at optimal angles. If the ideal seat depth, seat angle, and OFL are all known, choosing the best route that the frame tubing should take to get to the footrest is simply a matter of choosing the best frame angle/frame length combination.



  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by jschism View Post
    are we no longer referring to this as the "schulte dimension"?
    I preferred "Schulte" -- i could remmber that. Who needs more acronyms cluttering up their brain? Oh well.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    I preferred "Schulte" -- i could remmber that. Who needs more acronyms cluttering up their brain? Oh well.
    Well, if you would have requested it in your CAD (or if Paul Schulte actually included it in TopEnd's CAD drawings), maybe we could have put it to a vote!

    I will agree that it doesn't have the same ring to it, but for those who prescribe wheelchairs "Occupied Frame Length" makes more sense.


  10. #20
    I like this measure and if it's not indicated on your CAD drawing you can still deduce it from measuring on the drawing and applying the scale.
    I did it for mine and it gives me more confidence in my specs as it is close to my current chair.

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