Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: A little recovery.. goes how far?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania, U.S.
    Posts
    243

    A little recovery.. goes how far?

    Hi guys.. My husband is C6/7 , 5 months post. He has always had feeling down to his toes, but no motor function.
    At 3 months he could move his toe on the right side
    At 4 months he could get his whole foot to move
    And now at 5 months, he can straighten his leg (just moves an inch or so), only sometimes... and can push his right foot down, not just up

    The right side is getting more return. My question is, how far is this going to go in the long run? We do Estim a lot at home and don't go to outpatient therapy (we are starting next week)> He does his arm workouts , and we have a bike that I just hold his feet on the pedals - this keeps his joints free and then i have him "try" to push the pedals , just to "send the signals " to the brain I guess We stretch just a few times a week (bad I know)..How much therapy are we talking about here to get him upright? Is this something that happened to most all of you- some returns, but then not enough to be functional in the long run?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania, U.S.
    Posts
    243
    Or are we well on our way here?

  3. #3
    You are well on your way. His recovery sounds much like mine. No giving up until 2 years have passed!

    It is excruciatingly slow. But every tiny increment of return is hugely beneficial in later quality of life.

    I just got back from going to Hawaii alone, as all my loved ones have recently died. Being able to lurch thru 1st class on a small jet is hugely beneficial. If he can't do that after 2 yrs, maybe he can stand to transfer from the Hannibal Lector Aisle Chair From Hell. Can't do that? He CAN FEEL IT SO THE AIR HOSTS OR WHATEVER DON'T BREAK HIS LIMBS!

    See? Tiny increments. Hugely beneficial. Time to count blessings!

  4. #4
    Senior Member trekker6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    merritt island, florida
    Posts
    2,840
    It's so hard not knowing what the future will bring, we all recovered differently, I'm a c4 incomplete, paralyzed completely for 2 weeks, six weeks later started using a walker, cathing myself with some wicked looking clamps, now I walk without the walker (although I'm a spaz) don't cath and have b and b mostly under control, but I suffer from spasticity and have no stamina. My injury happened when I was 59 and your husband is younger so that is in his favor, every little bit he gets is important, don't stop working, but your life and his have changed, my fiancé has accepted my limitations and I'm a lucky man. Hang in there, it's a hard thing that happened to your life, but it could always have been worse.
    "Would you rather reduce deficits and interest rates by raising revenue from those who are not now paying their fair share, or would you rather accept larger budget deficits, higher interest rates, and higher unemployment? And I think I know your answer." Ronald Reagan"

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    hampton bays new york
    Posts
    1,016
    It sounds good. I would sit , and dangle my feat at first, working on fine motor skills, without any of that I don't know where you can go with strength. Than start applying the strength. I still play on the edge of one of my welding benches a few times a week and dangle my legs and make them do strange repetitious things. I've been working the S%$& out of my left one lately, I'm trying to get it to respond to the burned out signals it has, oddly it is the one with the most amount of feeling. The right one is working great, but, I lit it on fire a few months ago and never felt a thing, still don't. It would be healed by now, instead i think it is the left one and lean on it, crawl, bang objects to move them in place, etc, etc, etc,. I got my legs to work again, but, I'm not the brightest bulb in the closet.

    You're getting stuff going that is the most important, if it is helping re connect, or redirect nerve endings this is important. I've got 6-7 doctor that don't know how the hell I did it yet. Most all tests say DEAD, the fire[s] proves some of their findings [there have been a few, more than I care to go into} It can't hurt to keep trying, see what you can do, how far can you go. The body is capable of amazing things. Good Luck to you both.

  6. #6
    Early on when I couldn't even lift my legs against gravity, I was struggling with proper transfers and then my rehab doc told me to use my legs if I could and even the ten to fifteen pounds of force I could muster made a world of a difference in how well I could direct my bum towards where I wanted to go.

    So everything helps.
    L2 incomplete with a pretty bad limp since 10/31/2011.

  7. #7
    It is soooo slow. I can remember at like 2 months I could just barely kick (extend) the lower part of my leg. I mean just barely. I was so excited. Higher injuries have so much more affected, so I don't relate exactly. He is waking up. This is huge.
    As for therapy I always did much more at home than at PT. I don't know what your regimen is so you may already be pushing it. Everyone is so different, but I want to share what I think really made the most difference. Standing. I know that sounds crazy given your circumstances, but there are ways and products that will allow for some body weight bearing on those bones. I would go out onto my deck and stand in the corner using the rails for support. My wife or son would reach through the rails from outside the deck and lock my knees. I did this everyday for 20 minutes.
    They sell standing frames and such and there is a good bit of evidence that weight bearing is beneficial. I couldn't even move my legs with out removing the gravity at the time and I think it really helped spark something in my body.
    I would do the same as Shveddy when transfering as well. I took every opportunity to work my legs and it did make transfers easier.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by betheny View Post
    You are well on your way. His recovery sounds much like mine. No giving up until 2 years have passed!

    It is excruciatingly slow. But every tiny increment of return is hugely beneficial in later quality of life.

    I just got back from going to Hawaii alone, as all my loved ones have recently died. Being able to lurch thru 1st class on a small jet is hugely beneficial. If he can't do that after 2 yrs, maybe he can stand to transfer from the Hannibal Lector Aisle Chair From Hell. Can't do that? He CAN FEEL IT SO THE AIR HOSTS OR WHATEVER DON'T BREAK HIS LIMBS!

    See? Tiny increments. Hugely beneficial. Time to count blessings!
    Betheny you crack me up, lol. Now I wish I had done Hawaii with you. Although for me, I woulda need the Hannibal Lector Aisle chair from hell, lol.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  9. #9
    Nobody mentioned it, but have you thought about 4Ap (Fampridine), for injuries of your husbands type I've heard it can be useful, I know there are some on this board using it with good results, I think Lynnifer is using it as I remember, do a search on "Fampridine". Anyhow just a suggestion to check out although I can't recommend it from experience because I've never tried it, I'm a complete injury and it would do me no good. I don't know a real lot about this med and I believe Dr. Young is not recommending it yet as it failed approval for SCI, although from what I've heard, for some it helps out. I think pharmacies will now compound this stuff with a script as a off use. I think they are still doing research on this with SCI and it may be approved for direct use someday, I think it's been said already to help out with MS through research. It seems to tend to amplify weak signals such as your husband has through his spinal cord therefore increasing function. There is talk of possible reduction in spasticity too if he has that at all.

    Anyhow, just a thought of something to look into, again I'm not a Doctor and this is just a idea to look into for you're husband, may be useful, may not be.
    Last edited by Curt Leatherbee; 12-09-2012 at 08:43 PM.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  10. #10
    When I was first injured, I couldn't even roll over in bed without help. It's been 29 months for me and I walk with hiking poles, am back to work, drive, b&b returned about 90%. It was a slooooowwwww process, though.

    I'm glad to hear he'll be getting therapy. They should be able to put him on a program of strengthening what he has. It works like this:

    When a person feels a bit of motor control return, it's usually weak and unused muscles have trouble firing.

    A PT will help put him in exercises that he can do and encourage those muscles to strengthen.

    In my case, I worked on gross muscles first..the big ones. Once I could get big movements, I was worked to more refined exercises, harder to pinpoint but very important if they are workable.

    As time goes on and muscles strengthen, he'll be given more challanging things to do like working with weights or working against gravity.

    Don't give up. It sounds as if he's got some interesting returns. You won't know how far he'll go unless you give it a try.

    6 months after my accident, I was unable to do a single hamstring curl without help. It has been an ongoing series of steps to where I can do 75 at a time, against gravity. Every little bit helps. Even if a toe starts to work, that will help him greatly with balance when he gets to the point of using it.

    I wish you both the best. Keep us posted on how he does.

Similar Threads

  1. ? about recovery
    By superx02 in forum Exercise & Recovery
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-28-2006, 05:30 PM
  2. Can leg muscle recovery stimulate further recovery?
    By Brighter days in forum Exercise & Recovery
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 03-16-2006, 04:09 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-21-2002, 02:37 PM
  4. Recovery
    By foster in forum Cure
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-31-2002, 08:18 PM
  5. Is 100% recovery possible?
    By gvinton in forum Life
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-15-2002, 05:38 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •