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Thread: SCI - The first time in South Africa.

  1. #21
    you have the news my friends
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  2. #22
    Stem cell surgery dispute

    Cape Town - The doctor who performed groundbreaking stem-cell transplants on a quadriplegic patient has been slammed by two professional bodies.

    Tommie Prins, 32, from Milnerton, told the Cape Argus last week he was “honoured” to be the first known patient to receive the transplant in South Africa.

    He had been paralysed while on a holiday on the Garden Route six years ago, when he plunged into the ocean, hit a sandbank and broke his neck.

    Now, since operations at Melomed Private Hospital by Franschhoek-based neurosurgeon Adriaan Liebenberg on October 10 and 24, an extraordinary recovery had begun.

    “I am very optimistic. Every day there are new muscle groups which wake up. We can see flexes in muscles which wouldn’t move before,” he said.

    But on Monday, two professional organisations expressed concern.

    Robert Dunn, a professor of orthopaedic surgery at UCT and head of orthopaedic surgery and orthopaedic spinal services at Groote Schuur Hospital, said in a statement to the Cape Argus: “These patients are extremely vulnerable and desperate for any improvement in their functional state.

    “It is up to the doctor to protect them and act in their interest. In the case of stem cells in spinal cord injury, there is only animal model evidence of any benefit. This procedure is nowhere near the level that it should be used in humans outside of a strictly controlled scientific trial.”

    Dunn said there were also recognised risks of implanting stem cells, including immune rejection and tumour development issues.

    “It is also offering false hope at this point,” he charged. “In my opinion, the procedure should not be performed on current evidence.”

    Asked about Prins’s apparent optimism, he said: “It is unfortunately false expectation. He is desperate and will believe anything, possible ignoring all risks, in the hope of functional improvement. We see this every day in our Acute Spine Injury Unit.

    “Even if the stem cells were to initiate ‘new nerve’ growth it’s likely to be chaotic and non-functional. In addition it takes months to years for the nerves to reach their target, growing at 1mm a day. After 18 months or so, the muscle motor endplates (receptors) die and (should) the nerve reach them, they are unlikely to respond to stimulation in any event.”

    Asked if patients should have the option of electing to have such transplants even if there are no scientifically proved benefits, Dunn said: “Only in a scientific study based on a probability of improvement from successful animal studies. There is no place for ad hoc, uncontrolled experimental surgery with wild claims and no evidence.”

    The Cape Argus learnt on Monday that a number of South Africans had travelled to countries such as Brazil and India to have the operations.

    But Dunn said: “We would discourage this based on the fact that there is no conclusive evidence of benefit in humans. One is never sure what is being injected as this can vary from animal stem cells to human. In addition there is risk of immune response and neurological deterioration, infection and tumour growth.

    “These patients often make huge financial sacrifices to try this sort of intervention, with no chance of improvement.

    These funds would be better spent on their supportive care.”

    Sameer Nadvi, president of the Society of Neurosurgeons of South Africa, said the society was in complete agreement with Professor Dunn. “At present there is no scientific evidence that stem-cell therapy improves outcome in patients with spinal cord injury. In view of the vulnerability of patients, the costs involved and the ethical and legal issues around stem-cell therapy, we urge caution.”

    Dr Liebenberg responds:

    “I am not aware that Professor Dunn has any experience in embryonic stem-cell work. There is a wealth of literature to support the treatment. There are a multitude of animal models and… several human trials as well. Embryonic stem-cell derived cells have been implanted in human patients… in the US. The embryonic stem cells used in the US are non-autologous and therefore have another person’s DNA…There has been legislation in other countries that [has] hampered use of autologous embryonic stem cells but this has now changed in several countries. There is no law against use of autologous embryonic stem cells in South Africa. There is no risk of immune rejection as Professor Dunn claims as the cells we use in our technique are autologous.

    “I do not believe we are offering false hope. I would not have performed the procedure if I did not believe there was a chance of improvement. The patient has the legal right to self-determination. This is a novel procedure with no other known treatment, there has been no prejudice against the patient [who] gave full informed consent [and who] had a full understanding of the potential risks and benefits… as did his family. We spent months in consultation with them and presented our findings to them in detail in helping them to make an informed decision.

    “This operation is the culmination of seven years of laboratory work, animal studies, cadaveric studies and exhaustive research of international literature results. We are hoping the work we have done will prove conclusively that this kind of work MUST continue.”

    Rif.: Jol News

    Have you a good life.

  3. #23
    This was Inevitable. Now the question is, more than ever, wait? or stick your neck out. (pun intended)
    "It's not the despair, I can handle the despair! It's the hope!" - John Cleese

    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials. (Ox)
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  4. #24
    hello my friends

    people have received answer by email ?
    JustaDollarPlease.org

  5. #25
    [QUOTE=Felice;1623324]Stem cell surgery dispute



    After 18 months or so, the muscle motor endplates (receptors) die and (should) the nerve reach them, they are unlikely to respond to stimulation in any event.”

    Dear Dr. Young,
    can you please comment on this?

  6. #26
    I like the doctors response. Someone who's not afraid to possibly help people....

  7. #27
    Embryonic stem cells come from embryos, right? How are they retrieving autologous esc's from adults?

    Nomenclature counts. At least learn wtf you're paying to have injected!

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by betheny View Post
    Embryonic stem cells come from embryos, right? How are they retrieving autologous esc's from adults?

    Nomenclature counts. At least learn wtf you're paying to have injected!

    “This operation is the culmination of seven years of laboratory work, animal studies, cadaveric studies and exhaustive research of international literature results. We are hoping the work we have done will prove conclusively that this kind of work MUST continue.”

    A quick list of red flags...

    "autologous" embryonic stem cells into an "adult" patient? What exactly is that? The cell maker has a doctorate in "veterinary science" and was convicted under an animal protection law? The patient says they are skin cells but not aware that they were embryonic obtained from a southern clinic? I wonder what mixture of cells were injected or if they were even live cells?

    They'll disclose the location and give tours after more patients are injected? They'll disclose later what they did to these patients.

    How much was the patient charged for this treatment in an unregulated country at a private hospital?

    What animal studies were done and published in peer reviewed journals for the scientific community on this particular cell line?

    If there were any done, did they undergo replication by another lab?

    "Cadaveric" studies...seriously?

    Where were the cells obtained? (A GMP certified lab so rogue cells weren't in the mix that could cause tumors in humans)?

    I don't seem to find these very important issues addressed in the article.

    http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/2012/10/08/the-road-from-paralysis-research-labs-into-human-clinical-testing/

    By: Elsabe British 2012-11-28 05:55
    CAPE. - Experimental stamseloperasies on a paralyzed man who recently done under great secrecy, even with a guard at the patient's door, apparently not reviewed by an ethics committee.
    The operations on Tommy Prince (32) of Robertson on October 10 and 24 in the Melomed in Belleville done by Dr hospital. Adriaan Liebenberg, a neurosurgeon from Paarl.
    Prince was paralyzed in 2005 when he joined Hartenbos on a sandbank in the sea have vasgeduik.
    The embryonic stem cells for the surgery by Dr. Jack Jordan "manufactured, because nobody in the world can do what I do." Jordan has a doctorate in veterinary science.
    He is under the Animal Protection Act in 2010 was convicted after an experiment on a pregnant blue monkey in Bloemfontein which her spinal cord "stem cell research" cut off.

    Liebenberg told Beeld Jordan's "stupid mistake with the monkeys referring, but to focus on the breakthrough".
    A Excited Prince said he knows where the stem cells come from, "but they made it out of my skin." He was clearly unaware that embryonic stem cells.
    Jordan said the eggs used in the process, at a clinic found in the southern suburbs.
    He or Liebenberg wanted to reveal where the is stamsellaboratorium, "but about four months or so, we will certainly take tour groups there," Liebenberg said.
    They or Melomed could present evidence that an ethics committee approved the operation. "I do not know if the hospital particularly had an ethics committee," Liebenberg said, and the hospital organized said Liebenberg ethical committee.
    Melomed initially requested in a letter on August 22 Liebenberg need to make sure "they get the necessary exposure of the operation", but the hospital did yesterday all more distanced and said the "specialists practicing independently".
    A letter from a former health minister, Barbara Hogan, addressed to one Dr. A. Citizen, is provided by Liebenberg, as well as a letter from the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) - both dated 2008.
    The HPCSA said he after the conditional written approval on Civil and Jordan (2009) and other conditions and specifically questions, but never heard from them again.
    To a question why the letters addressed to Burger, Liebenberg said Burger is one of his patients.
    In a statement that the specific procedure proven and cancer growth can cause a question about how exactly was done, Liebenberg said: "We will have five to ten patients do before we in a scientific forum will tell we did. Just now trying a fool in India to imitate it. "

    Response
    CAPE. There are very few places and people in the world who can do this research, and there is no evidence that it helps people with spinal cord injuries.
    That was the reaction of prof. Susan Kidson, vice dean at the University of Cape Town's Faculty Medicine and self leading stamselkenner, when she heard of the operation on Tommy Prince was done. "As far as I know, there is no approval in South Africa for embryonic stem cell research grant . " She said if such research is done, it will be "completely open". "Many scientists from various universities will be involved and very strict ethical standards will be followed. "There are few places in the world that can do and my concern is there was already evidence that tumors can develop this kind of stem cells," said Kidson said. Volksblad could not get the involvement of an ethics committee at the operation in the private hospital Melomed Bellville by dr. Adriaan Liebenberg done. On a question whether there is any clinical research ahead of time, he said: "No, someone somewhere first." Prof. Michael Pepper, known stamselnavorser and director of the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the University of Pretoria, responded after alleged approval letters submitted to him: "There are many problems with permission. We also do not know whether the procedure is safe. "if the right channels are not followed and something goes wrong, South Africa as a scientific country can not afford. It can harm the field of stem cell research here many, "he said. Dr. Gert Jordaan, the private research, said they had eggs and remove the cores obtained. "I clone cells." He then nuclei of Prince's skin cells removed and the eggs placed.he said it was not necessary to first cells to be differentiated, because they contact the spinal cord would know which cells to form. Altogether 35? mm of Prince's spinal cord was cut out and replaced with the stem cells. Pepper said the technique could be problematic if the cells do not stop growing. Moreover, this part of Prince's spinal cord is now gone forever. "It is too early to any regeneration expect," Pepper said. Liebenberg said: "It depends on what stage you have implants. But this is our intellectual property. "


    http://m.news24.com/volksblad/Aktuee...rsien-20121127
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 12-08-2012 at 03:18 AM.

  9. #29
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    The critique is typically wet blanket. Of course caution is needed, but the follower of developments in this field could be forgiven for thinking there is some vested interest against anything that may provide a way forward. The current scenario bottom line appears to be that most of creation seems amenable to spinal repair while poor old homo sapiens is excluded - totally.

    Either the claims made for the animals are false (which on the available evidence is unlikely), or man has some kind of inbuilt doom machine that resists attempts at repair. Even allowing for the greater co-ordinative complexities involved, this is beginning to appear lame. Dog walks again, albeit wobbly; man = zilch! unless he must be imagining it.
    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
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  10. #30
    Wise!? - a comment, please?
    "It's not the despair, I can handle the despair! It's the hope!" - John Cleese

    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials. (Ox)
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

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