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Thread: Someone Please Help? Not Sure What To Do?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliegirl2010 View Post
    ok thank you! Now as a point of clarification, what do you mean when you say you can calculate formal charge? What info does that give you? I feel like an idiot asking that btw
    there is a formula for it, it tells you which elements in the molecule have what charge(positive/negative) and you can use it to see how well your lewis structure is

    formal charge = #valence e- - (#nonboding e- + 1/2#bonding e-)
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  2. #12
    WG, I'm guessing your spatial challenges are lifelong and due to cerebral palsy.

    You may wish to ask for accommodation for these classes where you describe the shapes and placement of what you need to draw on your tests. Memorize everything and ask about taking tests verbally and/or request someone to write for you. Request a small, quiet room and additional time to take any and all exams and quizzes. You may find yourself less fatigued taking exams if you take them in the a.m.

    For math courses I took, I asked for additional time, enlarged text on all tests and I used extra paper to work problems, find solutions when I had professors who insisted on written tests. I scored higher and had less test anxiety when I was allowed to solve in my head and give answers verbally.

    By writing extremely large, I could better see what I was doing and could tell the difference between 3 and 0 and 8, between 1 and 7, between 4 and 9 and 5. I see double (you may, too, as it is pretty common for those of us w/CP) and my eyesight worsens when I am fatigued. Math was my albatross until I began taking classes with accommodation.

    Find what you need and don't hesitate to ask for it for your classes. If you want to be an OT, go for it. What you learn about yourself and how you process info will be an asset to you when you become an OT.

    Good luck!

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by LaMemChose View Post
    WG, I'm guessing your spatial challenges are lifelong and due to cerebral palsy.

    You may wish to ask for accommodation for these classes where you describe the shapes and placement of what you need to draw on your tests. Memorize everything and ask about taking tests verbally and/or request someone to write for you. Request a small, quiet room and additional time to take any and all exams and quizzes. You may find yourself less fatigued taking exams if you take them in the a.m.

    For math courses I took, I asked for additional time, enlarged text on all tests and I used extra paper to work problems, find solutions when I had professors who insisted on written tests. I scored higher and had less test anxiety when I was allowed to solve in my head and give answers verbally.

    By writing extremely large, I could better see what I was doing and could tell the difference between 3 and 0 and 8, between 1 and 7, between 4 and 9 and 5. I see double (you may, too, as it is pretty common for those of us w/CP) and my eyesight worsens when I am fatigued. Math was my albatross until I began taking classes with accommodation.

    Find what you need and don't hesitate to ask for it for your classes. If you want to be an OT, go for it. What you learn about yourself and how you process info will be an asset to you when you become an OT.

    Good luck!
    That would be a correct guess about the spatial challenges and thank you for the advice, it's really helpful!

    WG

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliegirl2010 View Post
    That would be a correct guess about the spatial challenges and thank you for the advice, it's really helpful!

    WG
    WG, glad it helped. I was so frustrated until I found ways that worked for me.

    I remember a statistics class where the professor would put the problems on a board with instructions for us to solve and give the answers aloud when we had them. I was working these in my head and would give the answers first each time. When it came to written tests, I flunked. The professor was annoyed and kept saying I was "too smart" to make such mistakes. A math tutor was the one to inform the prof (and me) that I was giving the correct answers on paper if the 8 had been a 3 and the 1 had been a 7, etc. (for example).

    I asked to take tests orally and the professor kept saying he needed to see my work on paper. That was when I asked for enlarged text on all assignments and tests not in the textbooks (I used a magnifier for books), additional time to complete tests and a quiet room in which to test. It made a world of difference.

    Also, if you are required to take any tests with a scan sheet necessitating you mark correct answers in small columns by filling in tiny dots, ask for a different way to test. When you go from a test booklet to the scan sheet, it is nearly impossible to fill the circles on the correct line. It may annoy hell out of the professor, but do what you need to do.

    Keep us posted. You will make a great OT and these classes requiring trial and error to complete will be assets to you in your career.

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