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Thread: Colostomy Questions For a Quad

  1. #101
    The only way to avoid odor is to have a pristine bag (have not gone in it yet).

    The other social downside to a colostomy is having gas. You can cut down on it with your diet but it can't be eliminated. If you work in a quiet place you will have gas that others can hear. Sometimes it isn't a big deal and others it is as bad as you can imagine. IMO, this is not a trivial issue because your coworkers opinion of you does matter.

    Four years ago, I was having a bad colostomy day (dramatic gas every 15 minutes or so for about half the work day). It was so bad I could barely muffle it (and I tried the best I could). A coworker (not a friend) on the next aisle over called the SVP over to hear it. Thankfully, it didn't happen when the SVP was there but my coworker kept insisting that he stay so that he would witness the "conditions that he shouldn't have to work under".

    I still wouldn't discourage anyone from considering getting one though.

  2. #102
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Using a vented bag with a charcoal filter works better than this, without the risks of leakage or odor that making a hole in the bag can cause.

    (KLD)
    I use a Hollister closed pouch with a charcoal filter but it rarely will release all of the gas. My small pin prick method works just fine to release it all, tape over, and roll. No odor sneaks past the tape and the charcoal filter will rarely fully de-scent the odor.
    "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

  3. #103
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    The only way to avoid odor is to have a pristine bag (have not gone in it yet).

    The other social downside to a colostomy is having gas. You can cut down on it with your diet but it can't be eliminated. If you work in a quiet place you will have gas that others can hear. Sometimes it isn't a big deal and others it is as bad as you can imagine. IMO, this is not a trivial issue because your coworkers opinion of you does matter.

    Four years ago, I was having a bad colostomy day (dramatic gas every 15 minutes or so for about half the work day). It was so bad I could barely muffle it (and I tried the best I could). A coworker (not a friend) on the next aisle over called the SVP over to hear it. Thankfully, it didn't happen when the SVP was there but my coworker kept insisting that he stay so that he would witness the "conditions that he shouldn't have to work under".

    I still wouldn't discourage anyone from considering getting one though.
    I agree that farts are the biggest problem for me too, and is difficult to deal with in a quiet setting like you describe. We can't feel the gas coming like a normal fart so there's no way to prepare. As Scott has said, irrigation will most likely remove most of this problem but it's just not feasible for me to irrigate.
    "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

  4. #104
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    farts are a problem but its rare for me

    but smell only if wafer hassrung a leak i love mine i use a 2 piece

  5. #105
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    The only way to avoid odor is to have a pristine bag (have not gone in it yet).

    The other social downside to a colostomy is having gas. You can cut down on it with your diet but it can't be eliminated. If you work in a quiet place you will have gas that others can hear. Sometimes it isn't a big deal and others it is as bad as you can imagine. IMO, this is not a trivial issue because your coworkers opinion of you does matter.

    Four years ago, I was having a bad colostomy day (dramatic gas every 15 minutes or so for about half the work day). It was so bad I could barely muffle it (and I tried the best I could). A coworker (not a friend) on the next aisle over called the SVP over to hear it. Thankfully, it didn't happen when the SVP was there but my coworker kept insisting that he stay so that he would witness the "conditions that he shouldn't have to work under".

    I still wouldn't discourage anyone from considering getting one though.
    The only thing I can think of why your having so much problem with odor is your disbursing liquid type crap. Because I have zero odor. I do fart. But I have never seen or heard anyone of my coworkers or clients say anything negative about it. The big differents is when they fart we all smell it. When we fart there is no odor from us.

    As far as your coworkers. You need to contact your human resource dept.. They aren't acting properly.

    And I would definitly contact a ostomy nurse. Because you should not be having this type of problem with odors. If you have a solid seal how could you have an odor?

  6. #106
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRainman View Post
    The only thing I can think of why your having so much problem with odor is your disbursing liquid type crap. Because I have zero odor. I do fart. But I have never seen or heard anyone of my coworkers or clients say anything negative about it. The big differents is when they fart we all smell it. When we fart there is no odor from us.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRainman View Post

    As far as your coworkers. You need to contact your human resource dept.. They aren't acting properly.

    And I would definitly contact a ostomy nurse. Because you should not be having this type of problem with odors. If you have a solid seal how could you have an odor?
    Thanks for your thoughts... Before I respond here are a couple of things to keep in mind.

    I've had a colostomy for about 7,000 days {that's a lot of data points - spanning university, my early 20s to early 40s, extensive travel, climb up the corporate ladder in several different companies, several different parts of the country, ... - in other words I've received broad feedback IMO and not just mastered one environment with one set of people}. I also developed chronic eczema (where the outer adhesive ring is) on approximately day 1,500 which oozes and creates a faint odor of its own and have lived with it ever since.

    My response...
    I'm not sure I would say I have an odor problem. I have a faint odor sometimes when I have drained a bag (on say day 2) and where you can't get the sleeve back to its pristine condition. It's barely noticeable to me but all you need is to run into one of those bloodhound type folks that yells out "hey what is that smell?" and won't let it go until they track down the source (YOU!).

    I work in a fairly high end math/finance type environment (we tee up decision frameworks for the C suite folks) and HR doesn’t really apply (oh you could pull HR in and make a fuss but you’d be looking for a job shortly thereafter).

    Ostomy nurses are helpful initially but you ultimately have to live with the colostomy and figure out your own approach. Ostomy nurses can also be helpful later if you need to get a different perspective but other than that I think you’ll find their knowledge is quite thin compared to your experience as a long term colostomate.

    Disclaimer: I’m not saying all this for the sake of arguing. I actually think sharing my experiences and thought processes might assist others in determining whether this is something for them or not.
    Last edited by Patton57; 02-24-2013 at 10:06 AM.

  7. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post

    Thanks for your thoughts... Before I respond here are a couple of things to keep in mind.

    I've had a colostomy for about 7,000 days {that's a lot of data points - spanning university, my early 20s to early 40s, extensive travel, climb up the corporate ladder in several different companies, several different parts of the country, ... - in other words I've received broad feedback IMO and not just mastered one environment with one set of people}. I also developed chronic eczema (where the outer adhesive ring is) on approximately day 1,500 which oozes and creates a faint odor of its own and have lived with it ever since.

    My response...
    I'm not sure I would say I have an odor problem. I have a faint odor sometimes when I have drained a bag (on say day 2) and where you can't get the sleeve back to its pristine condition. It's barely noticeable to me but all you need is to run into one of those bloodhound type folks that yells out "hey what is that smell?" and won't let it go until they track down the source (YOU!).

    I work in a fairly high end math/finance type environment (we tee up decision frameworks for the C suite folks) and HR doesn’t really apply (oh you could pull HR in and make a fuss but you’d be looking for a job shortly thereafter).

    Ostomy nurses are helpful initially but you ultimately have to live with the colostomy and figure out your own approach. Ostomy nurses can also be helpful later if you need to get a different perspective but other than that I think you’ll find their knowledge is quite thin compared to your experience as a long term colostomate.

    Disclaimer: I’m not saying all this for the sake of arguing. I actually think sharing my experiences and thought processes might assist others in determining whether this is something for them or not.
    I think with a colostomy you need to change the bag dailey and clean the stoma with hand wipes. Otherwise I could see someone having odor issues. Plus it would be better on the skin. I know i'm new at this but with my program I have had no issues with odor or skin.

  8. #108
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRainman View Post
    I think with a colostomy you need to change the bag dailey and clean the stoma with hand wipes. Otherwise I could see someone having odor issues. Plus it would be better on the skin. I know i'm new at this but with my program I have had no issues with odor or skin.
    I'm glad yours is working well for you. It sure beats a bp IMO. I've never regreted getting mine.

    I don't mean to throw the colostomy experience card in your face either. I'm just saying that I've had a lot of different looks at it over the years. A lot of lessons learned if you will.

    You know, you really have your $hit together with this colostomy thing. Now if we can just get you cleaned up in the political forum we'll have you firing on all cylinders.

  9. #109
    Quote Originally Posted by Patton57 View Post
    I'm glad yours is working well for you. It sure beats a bp IMO. I've never regreted getting mine.

    I don't mean to throw the colostomy experience card in your face either. I'm just saying that I've had a lot of different looks at it over the years. A lot of lessons learned if you will.

    You know, you really have your $hit together with this colostomy thing. Now if we can just get you cleaned up in the political forum we'll have you firing on all cylinders.

    My main concerned with this post was to let people know if you get a coostomy it can be easily taken care of without odors. A foley to me is a lot more difficult to take care of with all the sediments and infection issues. With a colostomy it changes your whole dailey schedule on your bm's. No more sitting on a commode for over an hour. Don't have to worry about accidents. You have a lot more free time and less worries.

    As far as my politics. Once the media starts holding obama upto his acountabilities. I think we will see a different president.

  10. #110
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Bad odor is not just a part of having a SCI, or a colostomy. It is more a reflection of your diet, or medication side effects. Your ostomy nurse can help you explore dietary measures to take, or medications, or bag deodorizers that can help with this.
    Shit smells like shit, no matter how you look at it.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeadEye View Post
    I agree that farts are the biggest problem for me too, and is difficult to deal with in a quiet setting like you describe. We can't feel the gas coming like a normal fart so there's no way to prepare. As Scott has said, irrigation will most likely remove most of this problem but it's just not feasible for me to irrigate.
    I hear ya on farts. I've actually gotten pretty relaxed on irrigation, and broken away from doing it on a schedule. I'll do it every 2 or 3 days just to get a good cleanse. Sometimes it's an AM thing, sometimes a PM thing. This probably isn't "ideal," but it allows for flexibility.

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