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Thread: Paralyzed dog

  1. #1

    Paralyzed dog

    I have Dachsunds and since there backs are so long they are always subject to paralysis.This is an interesting article

    http://now.msn.com/jasper-the-paraly...into-its-spine

  2. #2
    Funny you should post this, I just watched this video on CNN about the same thing. OEG was a big thing a few years back and tried a lot on humans but did not really do much. It does appear to work better on dogs. The bad news is the Dr. says at the end of the video that there more than likely will never be any quick fixes for humans. http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=hp_t2#...foster-pkg.cnn
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  3. #3
    Rats, and dogs - but not humans.. - and I don't care about a 'quick fix' - I care about a fix and doctors saying: 'we're working on it, and making progress' ...
    "It's not the despair, I can handle the despair! It's the hope!" - John Cleese

    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials. (Ox)
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by topperf View Post
    Rats, and dogs - but not humans.. - and I don't care about a 'quick fix' - I care about a fix and doctors saying: 'we're working on it, and making progress' ...
    Like!
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  5. #5
    I watched this on BBC, the connection with the brain is NOT restored, the dog can walk because the backlimbs are reconnected with the forelimbs, this is by the human maybe not possible.

  6. #6
    Senior Member muskie's Avatar
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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...treatment.html

    This is great news because these are chronic injuries, also some regained bowel and bladder function. Another plus is that is not a rat but a larger animal. If this treatment can stimulate the Central Pattern Generator then maybe it will help humans.
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  7. #7
    Senior Member KIM's Avatar
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    Just a question . Can paralized dogs wag their tail?

  8. #8

    Jasper the weiner dog re-walk..,

    Six months after an experimental treatment, a dog named Jasper can walk again.

    This "utterly magic" — according to the dog's owner — treatment is thanks to researchers from the University of Cambridge. They've restored the ability for dogs with spinal injuries to walk again by injecting them with special cells taken from their own noses.
    Robin Franklin, a co-author of the study on the dogs, which was published in the November issue of the journal Brain, said in a statement from the University:
    "Our findings are extremely exciting because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement. We’re confident that the technique might be able to restore at least a small amount of movement in human patients with spinal cord injuries but that’s a long way from saying they might be able to regain all lost function. It’s more likely that this procedure might one day be used as part of a combination of treatments, alongside drug and physical therapies, for example."
    The scientists used 34 pet dogs that had suffered spontaneous and accidental injuries to their spinal cords, which left them unable to use their hind legs. They took a special type of cell from the dogs' noses, called the olfactory ensheathing cells, and grew them up in the lab. These cells maintain the nerve pathways between the nose and the brain, and have special properties that support nerve fiber growth.
    After enough cells were grown in the lab, they were injected into the spine and were able to regenerate the damaged nerves and help the dogs regain the ability to walk. Check the video below to see Jasper before and after six months of treatment:


    Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-par...#ixzz2CoH3iSL1

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DupeNet View Post
    Six months after an experimental treatment, a dog named Jasper can walk again.

    This "utterly magic" — according to the dog's owner — treatment is thanks to researchers from the University of Cambridge. They've restored the ability for dogs with spinal injuries to walk again by injecting them with special cells taken from their own noses.
    Robin Franklin, a co-author of the study on the dogs, which was published in the November issue of the journal Brain, said in a statement from the University:
    "Our findings are extremely exciting because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement. We’re confident that the technique might be able to restore at least a small amount of movement in human patients with spinal cord injuries but that’s a long way from saying they might be able to regain all lost function. It’s more likely that this procedure might one day be used as part of a combination of treatments, alongside drug and physical therapies, for example."
    The scientists used 34 pet dogs that had suffered spontaneous and accidental injuries to their spinal cords, which left them unable to use their hind legs. They took a special type of cell from the dogs' noses, called the olfactory ensheathing cells, and grew them up in the lab. These cells maintain the nerve pathways between the nose and the brain, and have special properties that support nerve fiber growth.
    After enough cells were grown in the lab, they were injected into the spine and were able to regenerate the damaged nerves and help the dogs regain the ability to walk. Check the video below to see Jasper before and after six months of treatment:


    Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-par...#ixzz2CoH3iSL1
    heres and article of Dr C Lims http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1864811/
    that you may find interesting on the above subject

  10. #10
    It's a shame it does not work with humans, I think that how the trials got going with humans because years ago researcher saw encouraging results with animals. Anyhow, it's good for the dogs, it must be misery for a dog to be paralyzed and go through life that way. Hopefully someday something will be found to work with humans.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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