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Thread: Thankful

  1. #1

    Thankful

    I'm posting the following message on the Cure forum, although it's applicable across the sciwire site...


    It has been yet another roller coaster in the quest for freedom from the imposition of SCI imprisionment.

    Through it it all I must thank all those who contribute to this forum. We do not all agree (thankfully) but with each message of insight, vision or anguish we help, heal and provide hope.

    I would like to single out the moderators who do such an outstading job stradling the line of personal bias and freedom of expression...thank you.

    And to you Dr. Wise Young, whose name really says it all. You have wisdom of such complex concepts, yet deliver them and assuage us with the tiresome energy of youth...thank you.

    Finally, a quote of reflection attributed to Budda who said:

    "Let us rise up and be thankful,for if we didn't learn a lot today, at least we learned a little, and if we didn't learn a little, at least we didn't get sick, and if we got sick, at least we didn't die."


    Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

    [This message was edited by quadfather on 11-25-04 at 08:31 AM.]

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    what we've learned this year is that the focus of researching ESC's is revolved around finding a cure for Diabetes and Parkinsons, someone the other day made a good point, those results may trickle down to SCI. We've learned that the closest trials coming to fruition are not suitable for neuronal replacement, putting those with extensive Grey matter damage in the back of the row, a row that looks to be too long for me to hold out. By the time I hit 40, it's suitable to just drop the charade and sliver on with life as a aging SCI. Wow! Losing your prime years between one week into 28 years old, through late middle age. Whoever came up with the slogan, " life is good", didn't have people like me in mind. What life is and will continue to be is intractable neurogenic burning pain, UTI's, cuts that don't heal, swollen ankles and feet with drop foot, pissing blood once and awhile, having uncontrollable leg spasms in a crowded movie theatre or restaurant, or passing gass with a intimate group of friends, or strangers, due to dysfunctional bowels, manually taking your waste from your bowels, trashcans filled to the rim with empty catheter packages ( wait for the raccoons to get in there ), losing all interest in sexual relations, since you are impotent, but moreso, have the valid appearence of a man aging way too fast, struggling to go on. That's what I have to be thankful for, since it was Dr. Falci at Craig who told me, " this is as good as it is going to get" regarding my chronic SCI function.

    sherman brayton

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Brayton,

    I couldn't agree with you more. I thought we were much closer to some therapies to restore decent function, possibly within 10 years. However, after spending the last month speaking with various leading researchers in the field, it seems we are no where close to getting out of these chairs or getting back some useful function. It seems the old hopeless "SCI can't be cured" dogma is still fully entrenched. I share your frustration. My 15 year anniversary is coming up.

  4. #4
    quadfather, happy thanksgiving to you also. While we may all feel sometimes like the turkey that has been reprieved, it is truly a time to give thanks for the progress and friendships, being able to share and work on something together that we know is right and good, and the love. Wise.

  5. #5
    OMG- Sherman Brayton, you are funnnnny. I am thankful for the laughter you have brought to me, if only for this moment in time...whew Raccoons lol

    Gods speed~
    Susan

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
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    118
    It seems the old hopeless "SCI can't be cured" dogma is still fully entrenched.
    Perhaps the dogma is still fully entrenched, but I will never succumb to it, I refuse to give up hope. I consider my self a bit of a realist; I don't create an imaginary outlook filled with fun and joy, just to trick myself in order to get through another day. I try to put as much logical thought into every decision I that I make in my life, especially when in involves the shape and outlook of my future. I do not look at life through rose colored glasses; still the reality that I see looks promising and full of potential.

    The amounts of promising discoveries are nothing short of astonishing, especially when the amount of funding is taken in to consideration. The good people working out the details of future therapies have covered a lot of ground in a very short time, and all with inadequate funding. With everyday that passes, science shows us small glimpse of what is to come. Some of you may see them as to small or insignificant, some of you may not even see them at all, yet I would argue that every little glimpse looks promising.

    By the time I hit 40, it's suitable to just drop the charade and sliver on with life as an aging SCI.
    If I hit 40 and I am still suffering from SCI like I do today, I will look at it as: "I am now 21 years closer to being cured than I was at the time of my initial injury." I am confident that there will be huge gains made in that time, just as history shows me now.

    What life is and will continue to be is intractable neurogenic burning pain, UTI's, cuts that don't heal, swollen ankles and feet with drop foot, pissing blood once and awhile, having uncontrollable leg spasms in a crowded movie theatre or restaurant, or passing gass with a intimate group of friends, or strangers, due to dysfunctional bowels, manually taking your waste from your bowels, trashcans filled to the rim with empty catheter packages ( wait for the raccoons to get in there ), losing all interest in sexual relations, since you are impotent, but moreso, have the valid appearence of a man aging way too fast, struggling to go on. That's what I have to be thankful for, since it was Dr. Falci at Craig who told me, " this is as good as it is going to get" regarding my chronic SCI function.
    Chronic SCI is nothing to be thankful for, all of the pain, the suffering and the lost opportunity it brings into our lives - It sucks. Living with SCI is not the life I would have chose for myself, but unfortunately it is the life I get to live. When it's all over, (if you're lucky) all that you are left with are your thoughts and your memories, that's it. Don't let life with SCI make you so bitter that all of your memories are bad, and all of your thoughts filled with despair, be great full for the experience and be thankful that you lived at all. It could always have been worse.

  7. #7
    quadfather - thank you. Hope your Thanksgiving was a good one.

    CarThief - well said.

    Life is 10% what happens to us and 90% how we react to it. It's all about attitude - something that we are in charge of everyday.

    Peace all. Onward and upward.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Duran's Avatar
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    Jul 2001
    Location
    Maximum security prison, Death row
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    441
    Bye!

    [This message was edited by Duran on 11-29-04 at 03:13 PM.]

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