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Thread: Illinois comptroller to unveil stem cell proposal

  1. #1

    Illinois comptroller to unveil stem cell proposal

    09:22 Illinois comptroller to unveil stem cell proposal - Crain's

    Crain's Chicago Business reported on Nov 22 that Illinois Comptroller Dan Hynes is preparing to wade into the deep and contention-filled waters of stem-cell research. The comptroller, one of the state's top two fiscal officers, has scheduled a press conference for midday Tuesday at which he will "announce a major proposal to create a state-funded stem cell research program," according to a statement put out by his office.

    * * this statement came across briefing.com this morning.

  2. #2
    Senior Member jefftwalker80's Avatar
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    The trend continues.... Thanks Arnold

  3. #3
    sounds like since Bush won't fund stem cells each state is going to start investing in stem cell research. California, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinios.... who's next??

  4. #4
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    Rich - Many government departments are facing cutbacks. The NIH is still pending $25M on human ESC and nearly $200M on human ASC. Plus millions more on stem cell research using animal cells. I wouldn't call that no funding during this budget-reducing time we live in. The federal government is trillions of dollars in debt. State governments are solvent. It makes great sense for state governments to help out. I hope many more do, too.

    BTW, here are the first 50 of the nearly 300 clinical trials under way today using adult stem cells...

    Recruiting Tandem Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Maintenance Therapy After the Second Transplantation Compared With Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation Followed By Matched Sibling Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Stage II or Stage III Multiple Myeloma
    Conditions: stage II multiple myeloma; stage III multiple myeloma; refractory plasma cell neoplasm
    2. Recruiting High-Dose Chemotherapy Plus Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation Compared With Intermediate-Dose Chemotherapy Plus Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Gliomas
    Conditions: high-grade childhood cerebral astrocytoma; recurrent childhood cerebellar astrocytoma; recurrent childhood cerebral astrocytoma
    3. Recruiting Filgrastim-Mobilized Stem Cells for Transplantation Using Unrelated Donors
    Condition: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
    4. Recruiting Tandem cycles of high dose chemotherapy followed by stem cell support for ovarian cancer
    Condition: Ovarian Neoplasms
    5. Recruiting Donor Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Relapsed Hematologic Cancer
    Conditions: childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma; childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; Leukemia; Lymphoma; myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative diseases; ...
    6. Recruiting Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes for the Prophylaxis of Cytomegalovirus after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant
    Conditions: Stem Cell Transplantation; Cytomegalovirus Infections
    7. Recruiting Stem Cell Transplantation to Treat Systemic Mastocytosis
    Condition: Mastocytosis
    8. Recruiting Stem Cell Transplant for Advanced Renal Cell Cancer
    Conditions: Neoplasm Metastasis; Renal Cell Carcinoma
    9. Recruiting Stem Cell Transplantation for Metastatic Solid Tumors
    Conditions: Cholangiocarcinoma; Colon/Rectal Ca; Bladder Ca; Breast Ca; Basal Cell Ca; Adrenal Ca; Esophageal/Gastric Ca; Hepatocellular Ca; Ovarian Ca; ...
    10. Recruiting Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation Plus Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Cancer, Refractory Breast or Kidney Cancer, or Melanoma
    Conditions: Breast Cancer; hematopoietic and lymphoid cancer; kidney and urinary cancer; skin tumor
    11. Recruiting Stem Cell Transplantation Compared With Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission
    Condition: adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission
    12. Recruiting Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Progressive B-Cell Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma
    Condition: recurrent adult diffuse large cell lymphoma
    13. Recruiting Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma
    Conditions: refractory plasma cell neoplasm; stage I multiple myeloma; stage II multiple myeloma; stage III multiple myeloma
    14. Recruiting Filgrastim-Mobilized Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation Compared With Bone Marrow Transplantation From Unrelated Donors in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies
    Conditions: acute leukemia; chronic leukemia; chronic myeloproliferative disorders; myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disease
    15. Recruiting Immunotherapy Using Cyclosporine, Interferon gamma, and Interleukin-2 After High-Dose Myeloablative Chemotherapy With Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: recurrent adult Hodgkin's lymphoma; recurrent/refractory childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma
    16. Recruiting Comparison of Two Salvage Chemotherapy Regimens Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Maintenance Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: anaplastic large cell lymphoma; recurrent adult Burkitt's lymphoma; recurrent adult diffuse large cell lymphoma; angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma
    17. Recruiting Autologous or Donor Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: recurrent grade 1 follicular lymphoma; recurrent grade 2 follicular lymphoma
    18. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Neuroblastoma
    Conditions: localized resectable neuroblastoma; regional neuroblastoma; disseminated neuroblastoma; stage 4S neuroblastoma; localized unresectable neuroblastoma
    19. Recruiting Study of Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation After Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Kidney Cancer
    Condition: Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer
    20. Recruiting Cyclophosphamide With or Without Rituximab and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Condition: adult non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
    21. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: adult diffuse large cell lymphoma; adult diffuse mixed cell lymphoma; adult immunoblastic large cell lymphoma; anaplastic large cell lymphoma
    22. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Men With Previously Untreated Germ Cell Cancer
    Conditions: bone metastases; brain metastases; liver metastases; Mediastinal Cancer; Testicular Cancer
    23. Recruiting Chemoradiotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation Compared With Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: adult Burkitt's lymphoma; adult diffuse large cell lymphoma; adult diffuse mixed cell lymphoma; adult diffuse small cleaved cell lymphoma; ...
    24. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: recurrent grade 1 follicular lymphoma; recurrent grade 2 follicular lymphoma; recurrent grade 3 follicular lymphoma
    25. Recruiting Alemtuzumab Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
    Conditions: stage III chronic lymphocytic leukemia; stage IV chronic lymphocytic leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; ...
    26. Recruiting Chemotherapy Followed by Peripheral Stem Cell or Bone Marrow Transplantation Compared With Chemotherapy Alone in Treating Patients With Small Cell Lung Cancer
    Conditions: limited stage small cell lung cancer; extensive stage small cell lung cancer
    27. Recruiting Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Conditions: recurrent grade 3 follicular lymphoma; recurrent adult diffuse large cell lymphoma
    28. Recruiting Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation Compared With Chemotherapy Plus Interferon Alfa in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma
    Conditions: stage III mantle cell lymphoma; stage IV mantle cell lymphoma
    29. Recruiting Chemotherapy, Biological Therapy, and/or Bone Marrow or Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
    Conditions: chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia; Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia; ...
    30. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Relapsed Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Condition: recurrent adult Hodgkin's lymphoma
    31. Recruiting Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma
    Conditions: refractory plasma cell neoplasm; stage I multiple myeloma; stage II multiple myeloma; stage III multiple myeloma
    32. Recruiting Fludarabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate
    Conditions: recurrent childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia; recurrent adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia; blastic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia; ...
    33. Recruiting Thalidomide, Chemotherapy, and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma
    Conditions: stage I multiple myeloma; stage II multiple myeloma; stage III multiple myeloma
    34. Recruiting Donor Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Primary Myelodysplastic Syndrome
    Conditions: atypical chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia; myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disease; ...
    35. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Followed by Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia
    Conditions: adult acute monoblastic and acute monocytic leukemia; adult acute myeloid leukemia
    36. Recruiting Low-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
    Condition: refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia
    37. Recruiting Total-Body Irradiation With Or Without Fludarabine Followed By Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies
    Conditions: childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma; childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; Leukemia; Lymphoma; plasma cell neoplasm
    38. Recruiting Comparison of Two Induction Combination Chemotherapy Regimens Followed By High-Dose Consolidation Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation With or Without Rituximab as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
    Condition: recurrent adult diffuse large cell lymphoma
    39. Recruiting Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Medulloblastoma, Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor
    Conditions: childhood brain tumor; childhood rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system; Neuroblastoma
    40. Recruiting Infusion of Specially Treated Umbilical Cord Stem Cells After Chemoradiation Treatment for Blood Cancers
    Conditions: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome
    41. Recruiting Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Previously-Treated Multiple Myeloma
    Conditions: stage I multiple myeloma; stage II multiple myeloma; stage III multiple myeloma; refractory plasma cell neoplasm
    42. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Germ Cell Tumors
    Conditions: recurrent testicular cancer; recurrent ovarian germ cell tumor; extragonadal germ cell tumor
    43. Recruiting High-Dose Melphalan Followed by Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Amyloidosis
    Conditions: refractory plasma cell neoplasm; stage I multiple myeloma; stage II multiple myeloma; stage III multiple myeloma; primary systemic amyloidosis
    44. Recruiting High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer
    Conditions: Breast Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Musculoskeletal Cancer; Reproductive Cancer; Skin Cancer
    45. Recruiting Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB Breast Cancer
    Conditions: stage IIIB breast cancer; inflammatory breast cancer
    46. Recruiting Chemotherapy Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Infants With Malignant Brain or Spinal Cord Tumors
    Conditions: childhood brain tumor; childhood rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system; childhood rhabdomyosarcoma; childhood spinal cord tumors; ...
    47. Recruiting Chemotherapy, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation Followed By Chemotherapy and Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Older Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
    Conditions: chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia; accelerated phase chronic myelogenous leukemia; ...
    48. Recruiting Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation Followed by Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
    Conditions: relapsing chronic myelogenous leukemia; chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia; Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia; ...
    49. Recruiting Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody, Cyclophosphamide, and Total Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia
    Conditions: adult acute myeloid leukemia; childhood acute myeloid leukemia; secondary acute myeloid leukemia
    50. Recruiting Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation and Low-Dose Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia
    Conditions: adult acute myeloid leukemia; childhood acute myeloid leukemia


    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

  5. #5
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Illinois looks at $1 billion plan for stem cell research

    By PAUL GORES
    pgores@journalsentinel.com
    Posted: Nov. 24, 2004

    A state official in Illinois is proposing a 6% tax on face lifts and other cosmetic procedures to finance $1 billion in stem cell research over 10 years.

    Illinois Comptroller Dan Hynes wants the so-called "nip-tuck tax" proposal put on the ballot as a referendum in 2006. If approved by voters, it could undermine Wisconsin's position in the Midwest and nation in a potentially promising new scientific field.

    Already wary of how California's approval of $3 billion for research might rearrange the national landscape for stem cell work and the jobs expected to come with it, Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle last week announced plans for a $375 million biotechnology research institute on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.

    Human embryonic stem cells were first isolated in 1998 by UW-Madison researcher James Thomson. Proponents of the research say it will add jobs and possibly millions of dollars in private-sector investment in the biotech industry.

    Hynes said he wants Illinois "to be on the front lines of that revolution," and he thinks voters would approve the research funding.

    "In the end, we're all in this together. We're trying to cure diseases that impact people from Wisconsin, Illinois and all over America. I don't think we can take an overly possessive approach to this," Hynes said Wednesday. "At the same time, we are trying to market this as not only an opportunity to cure disease, but to establish Illinois as a major center of this research."

    Hynes' proposal comes less than a week after the Illinois Senate failed by two votes to pass...

    http://www.jsonline.com/bym/news/nov04/278364.asp

    ~It's troubling that exit polls and vote totals were so far out of whack. "I've spent my whole life in marketing. The difference is clearly beyond any sampling variability. ... The community of statisticians and media experts need to not let this be dropped"~ Bill Hawkes, a retired A.C. Nielsen Co. statistician.

  6. #6
    Jeff, unfortunately, the fears concerning the Republican antipathy towards science and scientists may be coming true. The Omnimus appropriations bill passed for FY05 increased NIH by 2% to $28.4 billion, giving most of the institutes 1.6% to 2.4%, failing to keep pace with the biomedical reseaerch and devleopment index projected at 3.5%. This is a cutback from $28.5 billion that was approved by the House and $28.9 billion that was approved by the Senate in October. See topic that I posted concerning the NIH budget. At the present, many institutes at NIH are funding less than 15% of grant applications. The only institute that is funding at a higher percentage level is NIAID because it has more bioterrorism funding. In other words, it doesn't look like there will be any increase of funding for spinal cord injury research in the coming four years.

    It is sad. Please contrast the just approved NIH budget to the $6.8 billion that Congress allocated for anthrax and smallpox vaccine development in May 2004. It is not clear that the vaccines are safe or effective (because they have never been adequately tested) and, if we don't get a terrorist attack involving either of these diseases in the next 2-3 years, all these expenditures will be wasted.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    It is sad. Please contrast the just approved NIH budget to the $6.8 billion that Congress allocated for anthrax and smallpox vaccine development in May 2004. It is not clear that the vaccines are safe or effective (because they have never been adequately tested) and, if we don't get a terrorist attack involving either of these diseases in the next 2-3 years, all these expenditures will be wasted.

    Wise.
    Sounds a little reckless, yah think

    I have always been supportive of cure research, but, Roulette should be played in Vegas. I don't think people would like to put off a vaccine for anthrax gambling on if, or if not, a terrorist attack might occur, and if it doesn't the money would be wasted. I hope what doesn't follow is why waste money on chronic research cause it will be money wasted because the chronics will be dead by the time we find a cure for them.

    [This message was edited by BigB on 11-25-04 at 12:53 AM.]

    [This message was edited by BigB on 11-25-04 at 07:24 AM.]

  8. #8
    BigB, you have expressed precisely the kind of thinking that is the reason why we do not have a cure today. There are many people with chronic spinal cord injury today and there will be many more if we don't commit ourselves to curing them. The progress that we have made to date is about what one might expect with an investment of less than $100 million per year. If we had started a serious investment of several hundred million per year in the early 1990's, I think that we would have a lot more therapeutic options than we have today. If we don't invest now, it will be another ten years or more. Wise.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Wise Young:


    ...if we don't get a terrorist attack involving either of these diseases in the next 2-3 years, all these expenditures will be wasted.
    I'm really surprised by this statement. I think developing these vaccines means we are a lot safer. Terrorists have to be less motivated to use the diseases against us if we have vaccines. That statement is also like saying that insurance is a waste of money unless we get sick.

    Imagine if President Bush had to explain to America that we're not developing important vaccines because we're curing spinal cord injury. He would be crucified.

    I think times are changing and funding increases have to come from outside the box. SCI research is worthy of any funding increase it can get. But so are hundreds of other programs. Some people want more money for after school programs. Others... the environment. Others something else. There's no end to the competition for the limited dollars.

    This is why I love having the China SCI Clinical Trial Network around the corner. If a therapy can restore significant function then that should open up all kinds of creative financing options. Take Will Ambler's community funded project and multiply by 1000. Or by 10,000. That has to be the kind of worldwide investment the SCI Community could raise privately.

    The parents who work until 6PM don't have time to worry about curing SCI or MS or Parkinsons or ALS or TBI or Spina Bifida or Transverse Myelitis or Cystic Fibrosis or birth defects or anything else. An after school program that not only keeps their kids off the street but also gives them role models for a positive influence... not to mention a healthy snack... is what will help those parents the most. The problem is that our uncaring Republican President simply will not provide these after school programs.


    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

    [This message was edited by Jeff on 11-25-04 at 11:43 AM.]

  10. #10
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    Jeff, why not increase funding for NIH even if this means further increasing the defecit? The benefit of a decrease in future health care costs and helping disabled Americans, surely outweighs concern over a larger defecit. Why not continue borrowing? Why stop now?

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