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Thread: article on opioids, chronic pain, addiction

  1. #1

    article on opioids, chronic pain, addiction

    http://www.everydayhealth.com/pain-m...6pLid%3D205845

    as i stare at the oxycodone and vicodin pills prescribed for my pelvic pain (which i haven't taken), i read this article. not too encouraging.

  2. #2
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    I took a lot of oxy (well for me) after the hysterectomy surgery ... from November until April-ish.

    I never became addicted to it.

    Just take it Cass. Get some sleep. I didn't read the article ... don't punish yourself.

    Take just half an oxy if you're worried ... that was enough to put me out at first. I made it up to two at once and a sleeping pill .. but never went beyond that. Don't need them at all now, though I still have some.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  3. #3
    Cass, I'm at the high dose end for the morphine mst, and peracet everyday. I take it exactly as I'm suppose to take it. No cheating. No matter if it's a bad day/night, you have to take it correctly. I see here in the pain forum once in awhile someone will talk about how they have run out of meds before the end of the month and are in so much pain.......well, what they have done is wrong. Speaking to your doctor about higher doses, or taking it more often needs to be done before you do that.

    Any side affects need to be discussed with the doctor. I feel they are safe as long as you use your head, and communicate with your doctor. I could'nt function at all without them. The pain would be too great.....as it is, it does'nt come close to ridding me of the pain. They just make it possible to function. Most of the time. Also, I would get no sleep without them. The meds are'nt knocking me out, I still have no sleep nights if the pain is intense, but at least they are helping some of the time.

    For me, I'm glad I finally gave in and went to the pain clinic.

  4. #4
    I've been trying for the last hour to find something to say to this, and I just can't. It's all been said before — you find articles that reinforce your paranoia about taking narcotic pain medication, others reply and try to reassure you with facts, personal stories, heartfelt pleas, the thread dies and nothing's changed.

    It's your choice, cass. You can choose to fight to get your life back by confronting your fears and trying the pain medication. Or you can continue to let the pain and fear control you. No one can do this for you.

    At this point, it's all you.
    It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.

    ~Julius Caesar


  5. #5
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    Addiction is not as scary as not having quality of life IMHO.

    As the video said, there is a need for these medications to treat chronic pain.

    A guide to safe use of pain medication:

    http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForCons.../ucm095742.pdf
    Last edited by darkeyed_daisy; 09-17-2012 at 05:10 PM.
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

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  6. #6
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    Narcotics. Opioid treatment for nonmalignant chronic SCI pain should be considered as part of a multidisciplinary pain treatment program in those patients who have not obtained satisfactory relief from either conservative or surgical treatment. Traditionally, opioid use for chronic nonmalignant pain was felt to be unacceptable and many physicians and patients alike remain reluctant to use such drugs for nonterminal conditions.32,33 This reluctance stems from fear of side effects that include impaired function and motivation, the potential for accelerated tolerance, dependency and addiction, peer criticism, and DEA scrutiny. Consequently, when an opioid is finally utilized to treat chronic SCI pain, it is usually too little, too late. Thus, it is important to keep in mind that although these concerns are legitimate and do warrant a healthy respect for narcotics, an unquestioning fear of their usage is not justified.

    The under utilization of long-term narcotic use for chronic, nonmalignant pain has been referred to as the “tragedy of needless pain” by Melzack.35 Unfortunately, as with the non-narcotic pharmacologic treatments, a review of the literature gives no evidence of scientifically designed, controlled, double blind studies with follow-up demonstrating narcotic medication as being consistently reliable in providing relief of chronic SCI pain. Generally, both proponents and opponents of long term opioid use in central neuropathic pain have submitted anecdotal data in support of their respective viewpoints. Proponents research has suggested that the use of low dose narcotics can provide pain relief without causing serious side effects and without needing to continually escalate the dosage.35, 36 Opponents1 research questions the utilization of long term opioids in treating pain without demonstrable organic pathology, such as neuropathic central pain.37-39 As the controversy awaits declaration based on future controlled, prospective, double blind studies, the use of opioid therapy should not be abandoned.

    If a patient experiences enough physical and psychological pain relief from narcotics, he or she is more likely to increase physical activity and participation in other treatments. As general health, function, and behavior improve, narcotics may be tapered.


    http://www.thecni.org/reviews/09-1-p20-balazy.htm

    As Hipcrip said, it is your choice Cass. Otherwise, I don't know what other advice to give. My quality of life has hugely improved recently with an increase of 5mg of pain medication.
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by thehipcrip View Post
    I've been trying for the last hour to find something to say to this, and I just can't. It's all been said before — you find articles that reinforce your paranoia about taking narcotic pain medication, others reply and try to reassure you with facts, personal stories, heartfelt pleas, the thread dies and nothing's changed.

    It's your choice, cass. You can choose to fight to get your life back by confronting your fears and trying the pain medication. Or you can continue to let the pain and fear control you. No one can do this for you.

    At this point, it's all you.
    i guess i shouldn't have posted my comment. i actually thought this article might be of interest to all of us in pain. i wasn't interested in reassurances on my behalf. sorry.

    eta: yes, i know some who accidentally od'd trying to end the pain for a night. this article was on yahoo news. i wasn't searching for it or anything like it.
    Last edited by cass; 09-18-2012 at 02:01 AM.

  8. #8
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    addiction is a real possibility. I have only raised my pain meds recently, and Ive been on the same dose since 2000. with some types of pain meds, like fentanyl, you expect to have a time where you might have some withdrawal. it is not great fun, but better than no pain control at all.

    I recommend oxycodone. one pill every 48 hours has made a big difference in my pain levels and suffering. I am prescribed on a day, but dont feel I need that so dont fill the script as often. i also use a calender and mark all doses on it. easy to take that to the dr and show your schedule and habits with pain med needs. Dr loves that.

    Iv never run out, except once with theft. never have filled my break through meds as fast as Im allowed, because I put up with pain take break through pain meds sparingly.
    it has worked for me, and though I am physically dependent, I am not about to rob a pharmacy or start buying or selling pain meds or anything like that.

    I do hope you find an answer soon, and some relief, what ever that is.
    Last edited by jody; 09-17-2012 at 11:16 PM. Reason: added something

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by cass View Post
    i
    eta: yes, i know some who accidentally od'd trying to end the pain for a night. this article was on yahoo news. i wasn't searching for it or anything like it.
    ya stupid people do that. I have always had a natural resistance to the effects of opioids and whenI was an AB took enough to kill a normal person several times. The withdrawals aren't bad unless you abuse it, not if you only take what you need to manage the pain. Others on here will possibly disagree with me, but my theory is that unless you are taking enough to release seratonin and are experiencing pleasure from taking them then the withdrawals are nothing compared to the pain that returns.

  10. #10
    I take anything and everything until the pain goea away or I go to sleep. Not good time to post as I am in alot of pain now and have been for the last week. Piched nerve in the neck they say, had shots to the neck, increased meds, bedrest, still spasming in the shoulders so bad I felt that my brain was going to explode. Almost had my wife video an episode so I could take it to the Doctor. He just sits there trying to look like he understands. He could only understand if I stabbed him in the skull with a fucking icepick. Disclaimer, I like my Doc and would not stab him.

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