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Thread: new chair, cant get up some ramps.

  1. #21
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    YEP! ALL these technical things these folks saying 110% correct. Your body before the wheelchair was continually "of the fly". I actually like that description here. I always do "on the fly." So much I can tip the chair in any direction I want. The pictucture moving your but forward is a great example. With all of these though you better be prepared to und up on the floor/ground until you master them. These things can change the COB so quick you have no chance to recover. I lift weights from my wheelchair. That took a while to learn control of the COB. I fell. But that also gave me the opportunity to learn/improve how to get up. I need to post a picture of my driveway.

  2. #22
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    Truthfully, playing/adjusting any of these things on the fly, you better know what you are doing and what could or could not happen. It is nearly impossible to write in words what your body does under all circunstances. Everything written here is correct, but does not work for every circumstance all the time.

  3. #23
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    You are right about all of this. I think that I will just leave things as they are for now and go for the longer curb cuts or go up backwards or keep asking for help. I've never been turned down and there are a lot of good people in this town I live in and I've never felt bad about asking for helpsince it just is what it is.

    I will go back to the DME and ask her for adjustment if it becomes an issue I cannot duck. I only have a 10% co-pay on DME and services. I'm a little reluctant to try it myself.

    @Lynnifer...I thought the same thing as you did..Just getting older and wimpier! Ha!
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  4. #24
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Thanks again for asking this question!

    I hope you don't mind SCI-OTR .. I borrowed your diagrams for my facebook.

    Still begs the question though, does this mean curb cuts, etc are obsolete from what chairs used to need? Some are 'generous' with their angle ... others are downright dangerous.
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  5. #25
    Great discussion!!
    Chas
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    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
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  6. #26
    Senior Member DaleB's Avatar
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    I have to lean forward quite a bit to navigate ramps and curb cuts without going ass over elbows. If I put my casters up on a curb, scooch forward in the seat, and lean forward, the rear wheels lift up. I use this to get up curbs way too high to jump up with momentum and a last minute wheelie. I like this, personally.
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  7. #27
    Here is a completely different answer and one that many people won't like. In order to explain it, I'm running new Spinergies and new casters on an old Quikie2. I love this chair, It's fast enough and light enough on the casters that I can slip over low curbs, ah very low curbs. I'm curious to know if you've tried those new Ti wheels on your old Kushall, of course your old casters may be an issue also as much of this wheelchair business is in the bearings and alignment.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
    Truthfully, playing/adjusting any of these things on the fly, you better know what you are doing and what could or could not happen. It is nearly impossible to write in words what your body does under all circunstances. Everything written here is correct, but does not work for every circumstance all the time.
    Agreed. But at the same time, nothing I have suggested here would be considered to be extreme. The Icon back uses a Varilite style back pad and self-inflates by opening the valve. It would shift the individual a 1/2" forward at most.

    My point is that today's wheelchairs are so much better than the dinosaurs of the past, but like you said "you better know what you are doing and what could or could not happen". Very few DME's know any thing about using an ultralight wheelchair. Many seating therapists do not understand how the dynamics of a wheelchair can change from environment to environment. I think I am qualified to make that statement because I was a seating therapist before I became a wheelchair user.

    What we are discussing here is not really new. Here are a couple examples of research performed 20 years ago that are still relevant today...

    http://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jou...f/brubaker.pdf


    http://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jou.../pdf/kirby.pdf

    Today's chairs are much lighter and efficient than models available 15-20 years ago, but the same characteristics that make them more efficient also make them more susceptible to external forces in the environment. Anyone who uses a custom ultralight should have their wheelchair configured for their specific skills and abilities and receive wheelchair skills training as part of the service delivery process. Unfortunately that is rarely the case.
    Last edited by SCI_OTR; 10-06-2012 at 10:52 PM.


  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Thanks again for asking this question!

    I hope you don't mind SCI-OTR .. I borrowed your diagrams for my facebook.

    Still begs the question though, does this mean curb cuts, etc are obsolete from what chairs used to need? Some are 'generous' with their angle ... others are downright dangerous.
    No problem. People in "the industry" have used some of them as well.

    There are a number of organizations currently asking the same thing.


  10. #30
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    1 other critical thing. Keep in mind you and have a coninual changing COG. The wheelchair is a fixed COG. On a flat surface, it is relatively easy to maintain the same COG for you body. Once you introduce the ramp, the COG becomes continually changing as the wheelchair moves. Your body may be able to adjust to that. The wheelchair cannot. The wheelchair, unfortunaltely, is not like your body. It is a static device you are using to navigate. The wheelchair is NOT changing COG for you. You need to do that. Even modifying the wheelchair, itself, is still only a stasic change.

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