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Thread: new chair, cant get up some ramps.

  1. #31
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    SCI_OTR....I agree a million times with you about these people understanding the dynamic changes in the "environment." These people look at you in an "office" environement and that is what they suggest. They have zero idea what your body is doing inside of yourself. Truthfully IO could write an awful lot of bad things about all of that. I need to keep my mouth shut, or I will be here writing a book. I just hope I am selling a message that people are smart and agressive and intelligent if faced with this.

  2. #32
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    I am not intentionally saying anything negative. If it appears that way, I am sorry. That is not my intention. I like reading messages from people who do understand these things that are really never told to the user.

  3. #33
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
    1 other critical thing. Keep in mind you and have a coninual changing COG. The wheelchair is a fixed COG. On a flat surface, it is relatively easy to maintain the same COG for you body. Once you introduce the ramp, the COG becomes continually changing as the wheelchair moves. Your body may be able to adjust to that. The wheelchair cannot. The wheelchair, unfortunaltely, is not like your body. It is a static device you are using to navigate. The wheelchair is NOT changing COG for you. You need to do that. Even modifying the wheelchair, itself, is still only a stasic change.
    No way? Thanks for pointing out the obvious

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
    1 other critical thing. Keep in mind you and have a coninual changing COG. The wheelchair is a fixed COG. On a flat surface, it is relatively easy to maintain the same COG for you body. Once you introduce the ramp, the COG becomes continually changing as the wheelchair moves. Your body may be able to adjust to that. The wheelchair cannot. The wheelchair, unfortunaltely, is not like your body. It is a static device you are using to navigate. The wheelchair is NOT changing COG for you. You need to do that. Even modifying the wheelchair, itself, is still only a stasic change.
    The whole reason I coined the phrase "Dynamic Wheeled Mobility" is to get users, clinicians, researchers, and manufacturers thinking of ultralight wheelchairs as more than simply a device that should provide the 3 "P"'s (Propulsion, posture, and pressure distribution).

    Many of the features already appearing on existing products with only minor design changes have the potential to transform the ultralight wheelchair into something that could be easily reconfigured to provide maximum efficiency when performing a variety of activities in a number of different environments.

    Currently, this is mostly done by using one's body to alter COG, swapping wheels, or having specific wheelchairs for specific tasks.

    Nearly every regular contributor to this forum realizes that having just one wheelchair in only one configuration may work well most of the time, but will limit their ability to participate in some activities some of the time.

    There are a few among us who have decided to do something about it and have developed their own products...


    patd...........................FreeWheel
    JeffAdams.......... ...........Icon A1
    pattherat......................ZX1
    maestro........................The Elevation
    Todd, ADI......................LWDAC Backrest (See Page 3)


    It is possible to develop an ultralight manual wheelchair that could be easily reconfigured so that it would be suitable for multiple activities in multiple environments of use. The powers that be need to realize that this is indeed possible, that such designs can increase participation, reduce the incidence of tips and falls, and minimize problems associated with upper extremity overuse. Weight should not be the only design criteria.

    It may not be as light as a TiLite TR, Pathera X or Lasher-BT Mg, but there is a law of diminishing returns when it comes to weight. The lightest chair in the universe is unlikely to be the most usable chair in all expected environments. The lightest wheelchair in the universe may not even be the most efficient to self-propel. The lightest wheelchair in the universe will do nothing to make a chair easier to propel over carpet, curbs, or ramps. The lightest wheelchair does nothing to minimize transfer gaps.

    The ideal weight for a wheelchair should be defined in terms of how easily the chair can be loaded into a vehicle. Provided that the user can load the chair into a vehicle easily, the wheelchair has an acceptable weight. A well-designed, soundly engineered product that can easily adapt to the environment could provide benefits for the user that more than justify a few ounces of "extra" weight.

    Designing an ultralight wheelchair that provides optimal dynamic wheeled mobility is possible. The full benefits are difficult to describe in words. Hopefully, in time, I will be able to demonstrate a more-tangible proof of concept.


  5. #35
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    I am not arguing, so please do not take this that way. I am not sure what kind of tone was on your message. What I was attempting to say, and I think you have said it here, is that COG can be altered dynamically simply by body movement. I do that all the time. But my doing that, is me changing, not the wheelchair. This is what i was trying to say. Going up short, steep incline move upper body so far forwsrd I won't fall back. The wheelchair itself is a fixed device except for the wheels. and a couple other insignificant parts for what we are talking here. Swapping wheels or specific chairs for specific activities is still fixed, not dynamic like an uninjured body. If I am incorrect on this, feel free to beat me. This is not a joke. I am fairly new to this site and learning how to use it.

  6. #36
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    Also, suspension on any device, wheelchair or other, definately makes things totally different.

  7. #37
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    I will even admit, my typing sucks and has a million typos all the time. I feel like an idiot.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
    I am not arguing, so please do not take this that way. I am not sure what kind of tone was on your message.
    I'm not interpreting it that way at all. If anything, I am challenging conventional wisdom in regard to the direction that wheelchairs should take in the future.


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