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Thread: Now Walking! - Muscle Stiffness Query.

  1. #11
    I did not, in any way, pick up the idea from Dale's original post that he meant a slap in the face to anyone. His was a grateful message and I think he has a right to feel this way without being scolded.
    I think we are quite aware that luck has a lot to do with recovery. However, when it is possible to work towards recovery, those that do so stand a much better chance and Dale's son has worked hard. I enjoy hearing success stories. They are motivational and they make me happy...for the people who have done well. Dale, I hope your son continues to improve and can walk away from every remnant of his injury someday. Best wishes for a happy future!

  2. #12

    Wink Possibly his youth Just a question ...

    It is great news
    Although rare from what I've seen maybe his youth played a important factor ,
    I do not know how or why things occur but only wish the best for everyone

    Care Cure is Family to me very dear to my heart for ever .
    Love ya all
    Sincerely ;
    GL

  3. #13
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    While not unheard of, AIS E injuries (where the person was initially paralyzed, and then gets full motor and sensory return) is rare. The person may still have spasticity and abnormal deep tendon reflexes and be considered an AIS E.

    Just be clear though, he was lucky. That much return does not come from hard work, a good or positive attitude, and/or wishing hard enough to get return. It does not come from being a better person, or praying harder, or a stronger belief in God. To say so is a slap in the face to those on these forums who are not lucky enough to get that much (or any) return. They did not get return because they were not good people, or because they did not work hard, or did not deserve it, or did not want it badly enough. They were not as lucky.

    Is your son taking any medications for his spasticity? Baclofen or similar drugs may be helpful, but have to be very carefully titrated as they can also make strong voluntary muscles weak, and can interfere with ambulation if he is depending upon some of that "stiffness" (hypertonicity) to maintain his stance or gait. It will be important to work closely on proper dosing and medication selection with input from both his SCI physician and physical therapist.

    (KLD)

    Hi there, thanks for your advise in para 3, as always it is gratefully received.
    I've read many of your well informed replies, and are in no doubt that you are a caring and experienced professional who continues to give time for those who seek advise and answers to their various conditions. However, with regard to your 2nd para, I am a realist, and have absolutley no illusions about the luck factor that played its part in the recovery of my son, what you say is indeed true and I certainly had no intention to cause offence to others on this forum. I do feel however that you have to be very mindful of what you say here with regard to things of this nature. Pure fluke/luck it may well have been, but I say, with respect, that you should be careful not to undermine whatever belief or faith people have or whatever other endeavors they're engaged in to improve their condition. Faith/belief is a common and basic human trait and it's what many hold onto to drive them forward to whatever outcome awaits them. Without that, many would loose whatever motivation they possess or belief that their condition will improve, and some, like Ian, do make it and others reading such outcomes need to believe that they too can make it. If those suffering just looked in the mirror and said "well, am I going to be the lucky one?" then I think there would exist a lot more despair, and enough of that exists as it is.

    Dale.
    Last edited by DaleMinton; 10-04-2012 at 08:27 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by truly View Post
    I did not, in any way, pick up the idea from Dale's original post that he meant a slap in the face to anyone. His was a grateful message and I think he has a right to feel this way without being scolded.
    I think we are quite aware that luck has a lot to do with recovery. However, when it is possible to work towards recovery, those that do so stand a much better chance and Dale's son has worked hard. I enjoy hearing success stories. They are motivational and they make me happy...for the people who have done well. Dale, I hope your son continues to improve and can walk away from every remnant of his injury someday. Best wishes for a happy future!

    Oh dear, it seems like we're ganging up against our dear friend, believe it or not I'd just read your kind reply after I replied to KLD so I hope you all believe me when I say that wasn't the case. Anyhow, I'm delighted that his particular journey has put a smile on your face ... that's also put a smile on mine! It demonstrates that these things can happen. Although Ian's recovery was remarkable it certainly wasn't a walk in the park (excuse the pun ). There was the paralysis, the usual pain, bouts of despair and anxiety, bowel and bladder issues etc etc and he still had to work very hard, and he did, very! We went out for a meal together tonight, and until his accident it had been something we had done together every now and again (father and son thing). It had been one of many things I had been quite emotional about thinking that we may not be able to share quite the same experience again had he not recovered. To walk into our favourite Burger Bar again and once again have a beer and a munch was a little overwhelming. Besides the stiffness in his legs he has limited temperature sensation also (although his response to touch is normal - nerves are weird aren't they), anyway, he's hoping that that will improve also ... we all know it's a waiting game and plenty of excercise. Take care my lovely.
    Last edited by DaleMinton; 10-04-2012 at 08:30 PM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    While not unheard of, AIS E injuries (where the person was initially paralyzed, and then gets full motor and sensory return) is rare. The person may still have spasticity and abnormal deep tendon reflexes and be considered an AIS E.

    Just be clear though, he was lucky. That much return does not come from hard work, a good or positive attitude, and/or wishing hard enough to get return. It does not come from being a better person, or praying harder, or a stronger belief in God. To say so is a slap in the face to those on these forums who are not lucky enough to get that much (or any) return. They did not get return because they were not good people, or because they did not work hard, or did not deserve it, or did not want it badly enough. They were not as lucky.

    Is your son taking any medications for his spasticity? Baclofen or similar drugs may be helpful, but have to be very carefully titrated as they can also make strong voluntary muscles weak, and can interfere with ambulation if he is depending upon some of that "stiffness" (hypertonicity) to maintain his stance or gait. It will be important to work closely on proper dosing and medication selection with input from both his SCI physician and physical therapist.

    (KLD)

    ....... Hello again, bearing in mind that this whole thread started with me asking the question about Ian's stiff legs I really should have given you a response to your last paragraph, apologies. He is off all meds and currently isn't suffering any neuropathic discomfort or odd sensations. His ambulation (and to look at) is pretty normal and he isn't relying on the stiffness to maintain his stance/gait, it's just that his thigh and calf muscles feel tight .. and his hands (clenching and release) but to a lesser extent. He does have full range of movement, he can squat down, use a tread mill and stepper in the gym, it's just the reason for the tightness that was of interest. He's pretty much resolved to the fact that he'll just have to live with it for the time being, keep doing the gym and physio work and hope that it will improve with the work and time.

    Thanks
    Dale.

  6. #16
    Agreed! We do not want to gang up on our friend, KLD!

  7. #17
    I'm 11 years post and still deal with this stiffness, especially in colder weather. I also still get spasms when standing after sitting for longer periods. These generally go away after a second or two...

    Congrats on Ian's recovery! Very fortunate!

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