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Thread: Are T12-L1 injuries and lower motoneuronal injuries more difficult to treat?

  1. #1

    Are T12-L1 injuries and lower motoneuronal injuries more difficult to treat?

    jimbo23 posted
    Dr Young,

    I'm a new injury and was wondering for T12-L1 lower motor neuron injuries what breakthroughs need to occur for their to be functional return. Are these injuries more difficult to treat with the potential therapies being worked on currently? your response would be greatly appreciated. thanks
    Jimbo,

    I am starting a new topic to discuss your question. I am heartened by recent research showing that embryonic stem cells can replace motoneurons, when combined with dibutyryl cAMP or rho kinase inhibitors. This is the first real evidence that I have seen that motoneurons can be replaced. For a long time, I was quite pessimistic about progress in this area because there was really very little evidence supporting this possibility. This evidence is beginning to emerge and I am quite optimistic. I will post more on this topic when I have a bit more time.

    Wise.

  2. #2
    Senior Member MikeC's Avatar
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    Dr Young, in another post you answered this question:
    brayton
    Member
    posted 10-07-04 02:31 PM
    Is there anything other than esc that can help restore function in lumbosacral paraplegia?
    I am no scientist, in fact I almost failed chemistry, but I would assume that low level paraplegia would theoretically be the easist type of sci to fix. The insult to the spinal cord is soo low that the distance to get to the nerves that control walking is soo small as opposed to a cervical sci.
    Am I right????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????

    sherman brayton
    with the following answer:
    posted 10-07-04 05:55 PM

    Sherman, yes, the distance for axons to grow to reach the motoneurons is shorter. However, the distance for sensory axons to grow (to the brainstem) is longer.

    Wise.
    I had never thought of the distance to the brain as a problem before. I'm anxiously awaiting your response to the question that jimbo23 asked and certainly appreciate your time and effort in answering these type of questions. Mike

    T12 Incomplete - Walking with Crutches, Oct 2003

  3. #3
    Jimbo,
    you and I are in the same boat.
    There is a lot of good info in this thread:

    http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=18333

    Jan

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Not to underscore quad sci but low para's are completely stripped irreversibly with no sexual

    sherman brayton

  5. #5
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    Brayton,

    Millions of quads worldwide would swap with you in a heartbeat.

    Spend the day with one.

  6. #6
    Senior Member MikeC's Avatar
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    Bump. I know the Dr Young has been busy but wanted to keep this topic alive . . . waiting to hear what Dr Young has to say about T12-L1.
    Mike

    T12 Incomplete - Walking with Crutches, Injured in Oct 2003

  7. #7
    Senior Member Kaprikorn1's Avatar
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    Mike...likewise...

    Kap

    "It's not easy being green"

  8. #8
    Dr Young,

    for flaccid denervated muscles are there any powerful muscle stims available in the US or any researchers working on this problem in the US? i know there is a thread on the research being done in Vienna. i was wondering if there was anything going on closer to home.

    thanks.

  9. #9
    jimbo,

    I have not heard of any study involving the high current stimulation used in Switzerland. However, there may be other approaches. For example,
    • we have been injecting stem cells into muscles to build new muscles.
    • Others have transplanted neurons into the denervated muscles and showed that these neurons will innervate muscles and prevent atrophy.
    • peripheral nerve bridges can route axons from ventral roots above the injury site to atrophied muscles.

    These techniques can potentially be used to prepare atrophied muscles when stem cells are transplanted into the spinal cord to rebuild motoneurons. So, for example, when stem cells are injected into the spinal cord, why not inject some of the stem cells into the muscles?

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Dr Young,

    Thanks for the reply. when you get the time can you explain to us (conus/cauda injuries) what needs to be done to restore function. is it neuron replacement and then these neurons have to sprout axons that grow to various muscles in the legs or are the nerves below the injury site intact so that neuron replacement is sufficient. i know every injury is different but was just wondering for an injury to this part of the cord. for example wouldn't the neuron that control legs be in the upper part of the lumber sacral enlargement like around T10/T11 (L1-L5) and sacral neurons at the L1 vertebrae level. or am i totally wrong here.

    also in regards to Schwabs nogo antibody that has shown 80% recovery on primates and should be ready for human trials soon. i know its a regenerative therapy but could this work on chronic lower motor neuron injuries especially for motoneurons that have survived the injury but are dormant.

    sorry for all the questions. i am just trying to learn as much as i can about these injuries. thanks for taking the time to help us out.

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