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Thread: Ten frequently asked questions concerning cure of spinal cord injury

  1. #61
    ps Wise I hope "erection and ejaculation" means feeling an earth shattering orgasm as well. Or, did you omit to say so because this is a public (pubic?) forum?

  2. #62
    Originally posted by Chris2:

    "quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I believe that there will be effective therapies that will restore function to people with spinal cord injury, including touch and pain sensations, bladder and bowel function, erection and ejaculation, and motor control including long-distance walking.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    this is the best definition of cure of SCI.
    i haven´t more funtions in my body .
    i don´t understand what´s the problem of misunderstanding.
    excuse my english."

    I think I know what Wise means. If you had all this then, yes, you would fool a third party and could lead a much more 'normal' life. BUT, if you can recall exactly what your functions were like pre injury then there would still be deficits by comparison. Being able to do long distance walking and feel sex then in a way we're being greedy asking for more!! But able bodied people, especially in their twenties, take for granted that they can sprint a 100 metres in under 12 seconds if you train, run a marathon if you train, climb sheer rock faces if you train etc etc

    Long distance walking and sex sound pretty good from where I'm sitting!
    chris, in all cases exercice will be the key of recovery. My objetive is FULL RECOVERY, i´m still young and i believe that i can do it. step to step, with hard training i will do.

  3. #63
    Walk, I just posted a topic entitled Regeneration vs. Cell Replacement Therapies in a partial attempt to answer your earlier question. By the way, it is a truism that expectations change. While people may be happy with a treatment that restores some function, they will want therapies that restore more function. A tetraplegic who becomes a paraplegic will want more. A paraplegic who becomes a household ambulator will want more. That is human nature.

    Chris2, orgasms occur in the brain and require more than an intact spinal cord. I don't know if the following is true but, in theory, people should be able to have orgasms in their dreams, even after spinal cord injury. But, in answer to your question, I certainly hope so but "earthshattering" is a state of mind, not a physiological phenomenon.

    Jessecj7, from the viewpoint of clinical trials, if you have had another therapy, some clinical trials may exclude you as a candidate because the investigators may not want to have the prior therapy interfere with interpretation of the current trial. However, in general, having had one therapy should not exclude further therapies. A clear example of this are some people who have had experimental surgery with Dr. Carl Kao who are now going to Dr. Hongyun Huang for OEG transplants.

    Wise.

  4. #64
    So Isildur, I won't fully recover because I'm old, right? Don't be offended by me - I'm in an argumentative mood - I've been preparing for 21 years to return back to full recovery and I know how you feel - I hope you don't need to wait that long

    Wise, I think orgasm is a mixture of state of mind and neural response and I think a spinal cord is an essential part - but I'm probably wrong - it can't just be a state of mind that I've not had an orgasm for 21 years - yes everybody I DON'T MIND "WASHING MY DIRTY LINEN" IN PUBLIC LOL

  5. #65
    Originally posted by Chris2:

    So Isildur, I won't fully recover because I'm old, right? Don't be offended by me - I'm in an argumentative mood - I've been preparing for 21 years to return back to full recovery and I know how you feel - I hope you don't need to wait that long
    sorry chris, if you be offended with my post,no my intention.
    cure for everybody in everywhere.
    excuse my english.

  6. #66
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    Columbus, Georgia, USA
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    My Question is for the child who was injured 2 years ago, C-2, C-3 incomplete Quad.

    He has developed a little scoleosis (18 degree). This concerns me. We have not had an MRI since his accident. I ask his Physiatrist and he says "what could that tell me. We know he's getting better because of his movement below the injury site".

    Could there be scare tissue needing to be removed. Could there be a cyst on his spine.

    I read about adults wanting to walk again, and my heart goes out to them, yet they have experienced things in life up to a point.

    What about our children around the tween age who have not experienced things. Is their hope for kids having this surgery in China?

  7. #67
    mom#1,

    I am sorry to hear about your son. Scoliosis is a very common complication of spinal cord injury in children and this is something that needs to be carefully followed by experienced orthopedic surgeons to make sure that it does not progress too far. Regarding MRI's, if it were my son, I would try to get an MRI at one year and then every two years after that for the following reasons:
    1. It is important to get a baseline on the appearance of the MRI so that if anything happened, i.e. a neurological deterioration, you would have something to compare with.
    2. Certain complications can happen after spinal cord injury, including the development of syringomyelic cysts and tethering of the cord.

    Yes, I know what you are saying about children. I have been participating in discussions at the National Institutes of Health to establish a new specialty of pediatric rehabilitation. The way that one treats children with spinal cord injury, for example, is different from the way that one would treat any adult. A developing child has very different problems, requirements, demands, and therapeutic approaches. How old is he? Was he walking before the accident?

    Wise.

  8. #68
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Columbus, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    45
    My son is 11 years old. Accident happened 2 years ago. Prior to the accident, Guthrie was very active. Rode quarter horses, 4 wheelers, had his own motor-cross dirt bike, played baseball since he was 4, loved the outdoors and still does. Even in the chair, I can't keep him inside. Very determined young man. This morning I was doing a work out with him and he wanted to pull his arm down 20 times versus 10 times. He is moving his toes a little on both feet. He can move his thumb and index finger on his right hand. Moving his right arm inward but not outward. Left arm, he can't physically move, but when I lift the arm, he can pull downward.

    What does all this mean Dr. Wise. Could the swelling be going down? Would the MRI show that? The Doctors here do not see the need for an MRI.

  9. #69
    mom#1, I am glad that he was injured after he was already walking. It always worries me when very young children are injured and then never learn or develop the muscles to walk. Restoration of function even after regeneration may be very difficult in such situtions. Regarding the MRI, he should have no more swelling of the spinal cord at 2 years after injury. That would not be the reason to get the MRI, however. Wise.

  10. #70
    Hi Mom#1, those are all good signs. I'm glad he's experiencing some recovery, sounds like he could benefit from intensive rehab. You're right about pediatric onset SCI, its affect on a child's psycho-social development can devastating if not handled appropriately.

    Please take a look at this article if you haven't already: Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury

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