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Thread: Ten frequently asked questions concerning cure of spinal cord injury

  1. #41
    Senior Member poonsuzanne's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Wise Young:

    We transplanted motoneuron-committed ES cells into the spinal cords of adult rats with motoneuron injury and found that approximately 3,000 ES cell-derived motoneurons (25% of input) survived for >1 month in the spinal cord of each animal. ES cell-derived axonal growth was inhibited by myelin, and this inhibition was overcome by administration of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or a Rho kinase inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. In transplanted rats infused with dbcAMP, approximately 80 ES cell-derived motor axons were observed within the ventral roots of each animal, whereas none were observed in transplanted rats not treated with dbcAMP.
    Dr. Young,

    Under the above description, as a rough estimation, how many motoneuron-committed ES cells are needed to regenerate 10% of the axons of the spinal cord in order to regain ambulation and most bodily functions as well?

    Suzanne

    [This message was edited by Suzanne Poon on 07-24-04 at 06:39 AM.]

  2. #42
    Suzanne, mouse and human numbers are obviously different. A more relevant figure is the 25% number. They found that the transplanted cells replaced as much as a quarter of the motoneurons. If true, this is quite a significant number.

    The 10% number that I referred to was the number of axons in the spinal cord necessary and sufficient to support functions such as walking. The paper refers to the number of motoneurons that control the muscles.

    Wise.

  3. #43
    Originally posted by Wise Young:

    Suzanne, mouse and human numbers are obviously different. A more relevant figure is the 25% number. They found that the transplanted cells replaced as much as a quarter of the motoneurons. If true, this is quite a significant number.

    The 10% number that I referred to was the number of axons in the spinal cord necessary and sufficient to support functions such as walking. The paper refers to the number of motoneurons that control the muscles.

    Wise.
    Dr. Young if this procedure would be done on a c5 quad complete what kind of results do you think we would see? At least in levels of function.

  4. #44
    quadpro, I don't know. This study at least shows the potential of embryonic stem cells to replace lost motoneurons in the spinal cord. Wise.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Jessecj7's Avatar
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    posted by Wise Young
    People should avoid procedures that cause irreversible loss of peripheral nerve and other functions.
    Dr. Wise, what type of procedures are you talking about??

  6. #46
    Peripheral nerve bridging therapies where the peripheral nerve is cut such as what was done in Italy, the stimulator system for bladder function where the sensory roots are cut, transection of the spinal cord to treat pain (this is ineffective for most cases), etc. Wise.

  7. #47
    Wise, thank you so much for this information. This gives me great anticipation for the future to come. Every day I am reading about new findings and procedures and It makes me so glad that we have such great people like you to help make our dreams come true. Keep on keeping on for you are a saint in my book.

    Josh Stevens
    T6 para as of 7/17/03




  8. #48
    "Chris2, you sound like you are feeling better. I am so glad. Wise."

    Thanks so much Wise. I AM feeling much better - I am so glad too!

  9. #49
    Josh, thanks. Things are moving very fast and there is so much information coming in that it is hard for even the moderators to keep up. There are a lot of unverified claims and hype. What people need to do is to evaluate the evidence. When even scientists are not able to agree, it means that we are in the "fog of cure". It is hard for people to get their bearings in this situation. We are trying very hard to make sure that all the evidence is presented. Wise.

  10. #50
    "Keep on keeping on for you are a saint in my book."

    I agree with you 100% Josh S.

    I kinda like the thought of a "fog of cure" - it's a whole lot better to have too much information than no hope at all. It must be hard though to sort out which claims are false and which are genuinely useful. It could be a bit like the boy that cried wolf - if the 'money men' hear of too many cured rats they may get sick of it and not finance the genuinely hopeful procedures. On the other hand if a combination of therapies is required then all useful therapies should be persued even if on their own they produce little recovery.

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