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Thread: Nerve Cells Successfully Regenerated Following Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Nerve Cells Successfully Regenerated Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Nerve Cells Successfully Regenerated Following Spinal Cord Injury
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    CELL GRAFTS AXONS REGENERATION COMBINATIONAL THERAPY
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    Using a combination of therapies and cell grafts, a team of researchers has promoted significant regeneration of nerve cells in rats with spinal cord injury.


    Journal of Neuroscience Embargo:
    5:00 p.m. ET, Tuesday, July 13, 2004

    Nerve Cells Successfully Regenerated
    Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Newswise - Using a combination of therapies and cell grafts, a team of University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine researchers has promoted significant regeneration of nerve cells in rats with spinal cord injury.

    The therapeutic approach successfully stimulated new nerve fibers called axons to grow and extend well beyond the site of the injury into surrounding tissue, following surgically induced spinal cord damage.

    These results prove that combinational therapy can promote the vigorous growth of new axons even after a complete lesion of the spinal cord cells, with the new growth extending through implanted tissue grafts, and into the spinal cord and healthy tissue surrounding the injury site, according to Mark Tuszynski, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurosciences at UCSD and senior author of the study. The paper is published in the July 14 issue of the Journal of Neurosciences.

    "Previous studies have demonstrated reduced lesion and scarring, tissue sparing and functional recovery after acute spinal cord injury," said Tuszynski, who also has an appointment with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego. "This study shows unequivocally that axons can be stimulated to regenerate into a cell graft placed in a lesion site, and out again, into the spinal cord -- the potential basis for putting together a practical therapy."

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/505973/

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    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Nerve cells can successfully regenerate

    Nerve cells can successfully regenerate



    SAN DIEGO, CA, Jul. 13 (UPI) -- Using therapies and cell grafts, San Diego researchers say they've promoted significant regeneration of nerve cells in rats with spinal cord injury.

    The therapy stimulated new nerve fibers called axons to grow and extend well beyond the site of the injury and into surrounding tissue.

    "Previous studies have demonstrated reduced lesion and scarring, tissue sparing and functional recovery after acute spinal cord injury," said study leader Dr. Mark Tuszynski. "This study shows unequivocally that axons can be stimulated to regenerate into a cell graft placed in a lesion site, and out again, into the spinal cord -- the potential basis for putting together a practical therapy."

    The findings appear in th
    http://washingtontimes.com/upi-break...3337-6654r.htm

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    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    they are replicating research and confirming results. the era of paralysis by sci is almost over.

  4. #4
    And then you woke up DA I sure do hope you are right, but I have a funny feeling you are not. I have the feeling it might be ten or more years, hope I am wrong.

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    Senior Member kngtreeman's Avatar
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    why only acutes...????

    scott r

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    Senior Member KIM's Avatar
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    In the Care Cure for Rats they must be very happy. How about humans? . So far this year NOTHING!

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    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Originally posted by scott r:

    why only acutes...????

    scott r
    Pre-treatment with cAMP could be a practical approach for treating patients with established, chronic spinal cord injuries, a possibility that is the subject of current study by the UCSD group.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Possible new hope for people with spinal-cord injuries

    Possible new hope for people with spinal-cord injuries

    By LEE BOWMAN
    SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

    Researchers using a combination of chemical boosters and grafts have produced significant regeneration of nerve cells in rats with spinal-cord injury, according to a new study.

    The new therapy successfully stimulated nerve fibers called axons to expand and extend well beyond the site of an injury into surrounding tissue. Scientists said the findings could offer a new approach to treating patients with established, chronic spinal-cord injury. The team is now experimenting with treating such older injuries in rats.

    While most damaged nerve cells regenerate quickly after an injury, spinal-cord nerves behave differently, sustaining secondary injuries from the body's immune response and in some cases destroying themselves. So these nerve cells have to be coaxed into growing despite these barriers.

    A number of researchers have had some success in getting bundles of nerve cells in paralyzed rats to regrow. They used injections or genetically modified cells to deliver growth factors to a spot where the spinal cord was surgically cut. Many of those experiments showed that injury size and scarring could be reduced, and even some function restored.

    The strong growth stimulation of nerve fibers with the new treatment approach described in the study shows," this is a potential basis for putting together a practical therapy," said Dr. Mark Tuszynski, a professor of neuroscience at the University of California-San Diego and senior author of the study, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience.

    The study focused on axons that carry sensory information, and did not attempt to test any functional improvement in the rats.

    New nerve cells not only must grow to work again, they also must make connections to neighboring target cells across a small gap, using special signaling chemicals.

    When the spine is severely damaged, that connection is lost, and gaps formed in the healed spine fill with fluid, creating an environment that makes it difficult for axons to grow across the void.

    Tuszynski's team reported that the most dramatic growth in their study came in rats that had been pretreated with a chemical messenger that regulates various energy-related functions inside cells.

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/nation...14_medi14.html

  9. #9
    It seems like this is the study Christopher Reeve is talking about here. Below, there is an excerpt taken from that article.
    "For spinal cord injuries, recent research indicates that using olfactory cells that are adult stem cells taken from a victim's own nasal passage seems more promising.

    Mixed with other cells and growth factors and reinjected into a person, olfactory cells may help spur regeneration of nerve tissue, tests indicate. Similar results are being found using bone marrow cells, he said.

    Research along these lines in San Diego, he said, is aimed at restoring function in patients who have normal spinal cord tissue below their break.

    "I fit that description," he said. "My injury is right below the brain stem. Below it, my cord is normal. We're talking about a distance that's less than the width of your little finger."

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    Impossible!! It will never work. Nerve cells cannot and will not be regenerated to reverse SCI. Research should be spent on improving quality of life with chronic SCI's. These people need real, valid hope. Those people need to accept the finality of their injuries. We need to teach these invalids like we would teach a 1st grader. Thes people need our help.

    sherman brayton

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