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Thread: Please help improve my seating!

  1. #11
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    SCI_OTR could you talk more about why a solid back shouldn't exceed 10 inches?
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Lin View Post
    SCI_OTR could you talk more about why a solid back shouldn't exceed 10 inches?
    They can exceed 10" and often do. Just not in her case. I am basing that assessment on the pic and my knowledge about her level of injury. By 10", I am referring to the physical dimensions of the back itself and not the effective back height (when mounted on the back posts). That can actually be higher. The key is to get support toward the top of the pelvis and the lower ribs. That is assuming there are no unknowns like pain due to any hardware/surgery.


  3. #13
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    Ok thanks, I thought you meant in general it was best not to exceed 10 inches for a hard back. My Jay3 is definitely taller than 10 inches (physical height, not just placement) so I was wondering. I need a lot of back support though and mine starts pretty low and goes up to my shoulderblades.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  4. #14
    Senior Member wtf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Lin View Post
    Ditto from my inexperienced opinion. Only thing I see is the COG is awfully far back like jschism noted.
    How can you guys (jschism and sci-ot) see that, I want to know. To my eyes, she looks great, but what do I know.

  5. #15
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    I'm a very visual person and pick up on things like that quickly. I also think my background in conformation (mostly horses and dogs) helps lol, allows me to see angles and such that work together or against each other physiologically.

    For this specific issue... One rule of thumb I've read here is with the arms hanging down relaxed the center of the hub should be about where the tip of your middle finger is. Using that, you can see the wheel is a bit behind. (and I'll add in here her arm isn't in the same position as the arm of someone without her elbow issue hanging down completely relaxed) With more stable chairs, hospital chairs etc the cog is around the very back of the frame, in line with where the frame stops. I believe with adjustable cog this position is around 0. So if you look for that point first and then see how far forward of that position the hub is at it will help. Theoretically, the further forward of that position the tippier the cog will be. But at exactly which point its too tippy is affected by other parts of the frame, this along with preference is why ideal cog varies.

    Hope that helps a little!
    Last edited by ~Lin; 07-30-2012 at 08:30 PM.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  6. #16
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wtf View Post
    How can you guys (jschism and sci-ot) see that, I want to know. To my eyes, she looks great, but what do I know.
    the axle of her chair is almost even with the backside of her body.
    the whole "thumb in center of wheel" is a general location where your body mass is centered(your trunk is the bulk of your body weight). adding extra length to chair and certain options will effect where the balance point actually is.
    I was wondering if she sits like that or just made sure to sit up straight for picture? if that is how she sits all the time, posture looks really good.

  7. #17
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wtf View Post
    How can you guys (jschism and sci-ot) see that, I want to know. To my eyes, she looks great, but what do I know.
    I was taught straight line from centre of head down through hips to wheel hubs.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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