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Thread: Question about handcycles

  1. #31
    Senior Member DaleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foolish Old View Post
    What did you not like about the XLT? What did it lack that you seek? Do you currently ride? If yes, What bike?

    The XLT was just fine. Having put tens of thousands of miles on my trusty GS scoots on the open road, motorbike camping, etc, in the years prior to my injury I'd had enough wind in my face to last me.

    It was kind of boring, kind of painful, and a bit of an emotional obstacle to put myself onto the road, on a bike, again.

    Hopefully, YMWV!
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  2. #32
    been handcycling for 36 yrs now. Had at least ten XLT's and XLT Pros. They were the fastest bike in the world at one time. THe design is at least 20 years old.

    The turning aspect of the XLT lifts the legs up while the FRH1 and !a doesn't. It seemed I was always trying to adjust the XLT's to perform a little better, with the FRH haven't had to do that and the turning is much more efficient.

    If you can buy a used XLT for cheap, they are a great first bike. If you are a l ower injury, I suggest the Freedom Ryder leansteer. Best bike for working the core and balance. If I were to buy new with not a whole lot of money, I would look at the FRH1A. It's the same frame as the FRH1 without the upgraded components. You can always reward yourself for miles done by upgrading them.

    Whatever bike you end up with will be worth it. It'll get you outdoors without your chair and get you in great shape. If you like riding, this will not be your last bike.
    Last edited by Patrick Madsen; 07-29-2012 at 07:54 PM.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Any thoughts on the Force G?
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

  4. #34
    For myself, the Force G's are okay. They are just a slight remake of the old T/E Gold. If I were just a little lower injury with better lower core muscle; not wanting to race competitively, I'd go with a leansteer without hesitation.

    Being a little higher injury and not wanting to transfer as low as the G is, I went with the FRH1. I feel there are a few other bikes out there that are more efficient than the G. If you could find a used one, that would be great

  5. #35
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    For myself, the Force G's are okay. They are just a slight remake of the old T/E Gold. If I were just a little lower injury with better lower core muscle; not wanting to race competitively, I'd go with a leansteer without hesitation.

    Being a little higher injury and not wanting to transfer as low as the G is, I went with the FRH1. I feel there are a few other bikes out there that are more efficient than the G. If you could find a used one, that would be great
    I have an opportunity to try out a Top End product of my choice next week. I have no clue what to try, but the Force R; Force G and the Force CC? seem like the bikes that are most likely to match my idea of enjoyable riding. I'm sure I'll have an easier time deciding after seeing, touching and riding an actual handcycle. Right now, my frame of reference is pretty virtual and I'm a hands-on guy. Big advantage to Top End is that they are in-state for me.

    Also interested in the Freedom Ryders and the Quickie Shark rS. Eager to find a leansteer to try. I've got one hip that isn't quite wonderful (not pain, just not a perfect joint). I don't know if that's an issue with leansteer? Is this like sailing leaning, or something more subtle?
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

  6. #36
    Sounds like it's all falling ing place FO. Top End make great bikes. The only reason I went FRH was because they didn't have a frame in a higher configuration other than the XLT. Which is one I dumped two models before. Really pissed me off that I had to go to another company.

    Going to the bike rodeo is going to make all the difference in a wise choice. And with T/E in Florida; that's just icing on the cake.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Foolish Old View Post
    Eager to find a leansteer to try. I've got one hip that isn't quite wonderful (not pain, just not a perfect joint). I don't know if that's an issue with leansteer? Is this like sailing leaning, or something more subtle?
    I have a Freedom Ryder LC-1. Lean steering is a very similar motion to slalom skiing -- the harder you lean, the harder it turns. The fun of it comes when you have a long winding road or even a relatively wide road (with no cars) -- lean left, then right and so on, and the LC-1 will go wherever you lean. It is a lot of fun. Also, one advantage of a lean-steer is that you can pedal while turning.

    You do need core strength to ride a lean steer, i.e., low injury.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Thanks guys! I'm wondering if anyone has any thoughts on the tradeoff of the aerodynamics of riding low and flat versus sitting upright enough to enjoy the pleasure of sight-seeing the country through which you are riding? There must be a generalized sweet spot (degree of recline), although I'm sure that place will be somewhat individualized. It can get windy in these islands on occasion. Leg cyclists who use a bike sheerly for transportation often pedal downwind and take a cab upwind (all the cabs have bike racks.) I say this in regard to a need to be reasonably air streamed.

    I do understand that some riders just want maximum performance. I may be wrong, but I don't think that's what I want from handcycling. Of course, I want the mechanics of the bike to be enjoyable to use. I also want the option to move along rapidly. Some of the pictures of the high trikes lead me to believe I want to be lower and flatter. But yes, I want to see where I'm going and enjoy the sights fully.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

  9. #39
    One thing I really like on the Freedom Ryders is the road compensator. With the T/E I seemed to rip the rubber grommet off on really sharp turns.

    I agree Kleon, there's nothing like ripping down a winding road on a leansteer. Always made me feel like I was in a jet cockpit. It was the best fun bike I ever owned. Just a little too high in the injury or I'd still have one. Frh was the second best then the T/E's. I didn't like the way the leg lifted on a turn with the T/E. May have changed with the new Force' models.

    For me, on the roads I ride, I want to be seen and not have to worry about if the frame is going to drag if I go on a trail or over a speed bump.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Dado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kleonin View Post
    Also, one advantage of a lean-steer is that you can pedal while turning.
    It is possible to pedal while turning with a headset steering bike. It´s just a matter of practice. Lots of practice.

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