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Thread: Assited transfer floor to wheelchair advice

  1. #1
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Assited transfer floor to wheelchair advice

    My husband has recently had a few falls from his wheelchair and in the middle of transfers. I´m looking for some advice for assisted transfers from the floor to a wheelchair. My husband has hemipareisis (very weak on one side of his body).

    Usually these happen later in the evening when we are both tired and I need to be able to help him on my own. I´m fairly strong, but smaller than he is, and it really does my back in.

    We have a triangle mounted low that we can use if I can get him to it by dragging him on a cusion, but if it happens further away, it´s harder.


    The last time it happened I was able to raise him to a bean bag foot stool, and that made it easier so we could do it in 2 steps to the wheelchair:


    We also have a hemi-walker that may help, so that he has something to grab onto that is in a good position. It´s a long reach for him from the floor to the wheelchair armrest that he usually uses for transfers:


    Note: We are also looking into ways to prevent the falls in the first place, but the advice I am seeking is more about what to do if they should happen. Some falls are also due to epilepsy, which we really can´t do a lot about.

    He really want´s his independence and is working hard on his transfers, but in his stubbornness does not always tell me he is doing the difficult transfers beforehand (we, especially me are working on that also).

    It´s a fine balance between overcoming fear of transfers or not attempting them at all. I think eventually he will be able to make them all safely, but I want to make it less traumatic and safe as possible when there are falls. Some transfers he does consistently well, but then just has an occasional accident.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  2. #2
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    Are you looking for something for you to use or him? If its you, then you could consider a hoyer type patient lift.
    Hoyer is just a name brand there are several other names.

  3. #3
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSWIFE1 View Post
    Are you looking for something for you to use or him? If its you, then you could consider a hoyer type patient lift.
    Hoyer is just a name brand there are several other names.
    I'm looking for tips, methods, links to videos, etc. that we both can use. It does not happen so often that we need a patient lift, and we really don't want any more big equipment than absolutely needed.

    Having said that, your idea of a patient lift got me thinking that we could use the electric standing frame that we have if he has a fall in the living area of the house. This is usually where he has falls if they are due to seizures.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  4. #4
    I would recommend a power invacare or hoyer lift. It will be better for you both in the long term.

    pbr

  5. #5
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Yes he has had rehab, and I have asked 3-4 PT's to go through fall training and floor transfers with us, to no avail. After 2+ years of fighting and getting no where, I was hoping someone might have some video links or tips that I have not been able to find. I don't think a lift is an option for us for many reasons, and I'm sure we will figure out something.

    Quote Originally Posted by smashms View Post
    has he gotten any type of rehab? if so why was this not taught to you both while he was there? my suggestion is to get to a good physical therapist and ask them to show you and have you both practice while they are watching you. i would not use the walker as it can collapse and hurt him and you in the process.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  6. #6
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    I found some transfer vests that might help:

    - Smart Lift System


    - SDS Transfer Vest


    - ErgoTrans Transfer Harness



    I've also seen rock climbing/rescue harness' that might work, and are way cheaper.

    - Rock-N-Rescue Chest Harness


    I may also see if we can rig up something similar, possibly using an old backpack.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  7. #7
    I would also recommend a power mobile floor-based lift. These are invaluable for floor to wheelchair or bed transfers after a fall, as well as for other types of transfers. Since you are in Europe, there are a number of excellent brands available to you (Hoyer is made in the USA, and is not a very good lift in general). They are covered by insurances in most European countries.

    There are devices which some people can use independently, but they do take some arm strength, and are also pricy. Here some examples:

    http://www.paraladder.com/

    http://www.enablinginc.com/products

    Here is an inflatable "rescue" system that is battery powered, called the "Elk". Also expensive, but it does work, and is used by a number of fire and police departments for falls in the home. We own two of the larger sized Camel systems at the hospital where I work:

    http://www.oakpointemedical.com/mangar-elk.html

    (I am moving this to the Equipment Forum)

    (KLD)

  8. #8
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    If your goal is to just find an easy way back into the chair and you have a manual chair around, the absolute easiest way is this.

    1. He lies on back.
    2. Flip wheelchair over onto its back (footrests pointing upward).
    3. While lifting legs, roll wheelchair back under his legs (top of backrest pointing to him until it touches his behind). At this point his legs can probably rest on front of wheelchair seat.
    4. Go around to footrest side of chair. While pulling up on legs, push the chair toward him so backrest slides under his rear end.
    5. Once he has been slid onto the backrest as far as possible, lock the brakes on chair. Then go around to the other side and lift the backrest (and his back) until the chair and him are sitting back upright. (He can help greatly at this stage if he can grab part of the chair pull his butt into the chair and pull his chest into his knees during the pivoting process) Since his weight is mostly just pivoting around the wheels, this takes much less effort than one would think.
    6. If you can't do it by lifting the back, and he can pull his butt into the chair and hold on himself, the other way to pivot is to go to the footrest end and pull down on the footrests (while possibly holding his leg to keep him from sliding back) using your body weight to assist with the pivot.

    This doesn't teach him how to do transfers, but it gets it done. I have seen very small people transfer very large people with this technique. Oh, and this technique really only works with regular manual wheelchairs. You can't use a dining room chair nor a transport wheelchair.
    Last edited by Kulea; 07-16-2012 at 03:07 PM.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  9. #9
    My wife has used the technique Kulea described with me after falling out in the back yard. It works well and is relatively easy if the person is not spastic. A few times I have gone over backwards in my wheelchair without falling out. I was pre-positioned and someone just had to pull the chair upright. I am surprised that someone has not invented an inflatable plastic chair that a person could move onto when it was deflated. Then when inflating it would raise up like an elevator to wheelchair seat level.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Kulea View Post
    This doesn't teach him how to do transfers, but it gets it done. I have seen very small people transfer very large people with this technique. Oh, and this technique really only works with regular manual wheelchairs. You can't use a dining room chair nor a transport wheelchair.
    ...or a power chair or scooter!

    It is easier with two people, and if he can grasp his lower legs or the leg rest down post when you are lifting, it will make it easier. Be sure to hold on to him as you come upright...it is easy to flip someone right out of the chair this way again! Be sure to watch his involved foot (feet) as you can also bring the front casters right down on top of them if you aren't careful.

    I teach this for emergency use. Tried to find a YouTube video of this technique without success. Someone should make one!

    (KLD)

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