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Thread: $6.34 million gift helps spinal cord injury research

  1. #1

    Exclamation $6.34 million gift helps spinal cord injury research


    The gift from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust will support researchers as they develop the next generation of technology to help paralyzed people regain movement in their limbs and enhance their quality of life.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post

    The gift from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust will support researchers as they develop the next generation of technology to help paralyzed people regain movement in their limbs and enhance their quality of life.
    Wow, what a great trust and source of funding to have on the side of the SCI community. The trust also supports type 1 diabetes causes to the tune of millions each year......everything from pure cure research to scholarships for kids to go to special summer camps for type 1 diabetics. This is really important news!
    2012 SCINetUSA Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
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  3. #3
    In addition to the announcement of support through the Charitable Trust, you may enjoy reading this article. There is information about the intent to move forward with a clinical trial for spinal cord injury.

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-06-23/parkinsons-cure-human-nose/55787500/1

    Roisen said he's excited about the research on nasal stem cells, and is stepping down as chairman of university's Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology at the end of the month to devote more time to it.
    He and his team are also studying the use of nasal stem cells to treat spinal cord injury; they announced results of that research in 2006.
    If everything goes well, Roisen said human clinical trials involving people with spinal cord injuries could begin next year, and human clinical trials involving Parkinson's patients could begin in 2014. Roisen said the treatment could become widely available by 2019 or even before.
    Steve Gailar, acting chief executive officer of RhinoCyte, said Roisen's research has been funded since 2006 with about $4.5 million from investors, including venture firms and the University of Louisville Foundation.
    He said the company is now trying to raise $10 million to take it through early stage clinical trials for spinal cord injury and to enter into the first early-stage human trials for Parkinson's.
    Joy Cavagnaro, a consultant to RhinoCyte on regulatory matters, said she's not aware of any other scientists working on using nasal stem cells in this way.
    She said it may be easier for Roisen to gain popular support than scientists working with embryonic stem cells, since the nasal cells don't have the same potential for creating tumors and don't raise the ethical and religious issues embryonic cells do.
    Whittemore agreed that nasal stem cells have benefits but he said cell therapies in general "are still not the first option for Parkinson's." Symptomatic treatments such as medicines or surgical deep brain stimulation remain higher on the list.
    And while the recent study shows potential for nasal stem cells, Whittemore said, "that's still a ways off from being a therapy."
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 06-27-2012 at 11:54 AM.

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    Wasn't Leona Helmsley the nasty owner of the plaza hotel who left everything to her dog?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nrf View Post
    Wasn't Leona Helmsley the nasty owner of the plaza hotel who left everything to her dog?
    Yes, that would be Leona.

    http://helmsleytrust.org/

    http://helmsleytrust.org/grants/489
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 06-27-2012 at 11:34 AM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    It's amazing what our news media chooses to focus on, isn't it?

  8. #8
    Perhaps I should publish weak anecdotal studies on a single patient (who was ASIA B from the outset) to get money from wealthy individuals. It seemed to work here.

  9. #9
    That is great. I hope that the trials go forward. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    In addition to the announcement of support through the Charitable Trust, you may enjoy reading this article. There is information about the intent to move forward with a clinical trial for spinal cord injury.

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-06-23/parkinsons-cure-human-nose/55787500/1

    Roisen said he's excited about the research on nasal stem cells, and is stepping down as chairman of university's Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology at the end of the month to devote more time to it.
    He and his team are also studying the use of nasal stem cells to treat spinal cord injury; they announced results of that research in 2006.
    If everything goes well, Roisen said human clinical trials involving people with spinal cord injuries could begin next year, and human clinical trials involving Parkinson's patients could begin in 2014. Roisen said the treatment could become widely available by 2019 or even before.
    Steve Gailar, acting chief executive officer of RhinoCyte, said Roisen's research has been funded since 2006 with about $4.5 million from investors, including venture firms and the University of Louisville Foundation.
    He said the company is now trying to raise $10 million to take it through early stage clinical trials for spinal cord injury and to enter into the first early-stage human trials for Parkinson's.
    Joy Cavagnaro, a consultant to RhinoCyte on regulatory matters, said she's not aware of any other scientists working on using nasal stem cells in this way.
    She said it may be easier for Roisen to gain popular support than scientists working with embryonic stem cells, since the nasal cells don't have the same potential for creating tumors and don't raise the ethical and religious issues embryonic cells do.
    Whittemore agreed that nasal stem cells have benefits but he said cell therapies in general "are still not the first option for Parkinson's." Symptomatic treatments such as medicines or surgical deep brain stimulation remain higher on the list.
    And while the recent study shows potential for nasal stem cells, Whittemore said, "that's still a ways off from being a therapy."

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